Tag Archives: call for papers

CFP: Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, University of Leeds, 10 April 2018

avila-753643_1920Call for Papers: Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, University of Leeds, 10 April 2018
Deadline: 1 February 2018

Few topics in medieval studies have as much current relevance and activity as frontiers and borders. Yet approaches to their study in the Middle Ages are often untheorised, and
compare, if at all, only to often outdated studies of the ancient or modern world. Yet
medievalists are well placed, given the richness of their material and the complexity of
medieval politics and society, to challenge such ‘classical’ ideas of The Frontier, whose
weaknesses are now being exposed by current events. A fully comparative approach to the possibilities of what it meant to establish, live in or contest a frontier or border zone shown by the societies of late Antiquity and the Middle Ages can power the development of a new shared understanding of the processes at work where borders are laid down or transgressed.

The project Rethinking the Medieval Frontier has been exploring such ideas since 2015. Its first one-day conference, made possible by a British Academy/Leverhulme Trust Small Research Grant, will take place on 10th April 2018. Scholars at all levels working on frontiers and borders within the period 100-1500 CE, in any geographical area, are invited to offer papers addressing questions such as these:
§ Who defines or defined a frontier, and with what effect?
§ How did the medieval understanding of the world envisage or describe frontiers?
§ How was a frontier physically constituted?
§ Did military frontiers differ from other sorts of border, and if so how?
§ How do archaeologists’ views of medieval frontiers compare to those of historians?
§ What persons or groups crossed medieval borders, and why? Who was prevented from
doing so, and how effectively?
§ What persons or groups lived in border zones, for what reasons?
§ How far did frontiers and borders create or inform medieval identities?
§ How do the insights of other disciplines studying frontiers apply to medieval societies,
and how do medievalist disciplines differ in their study of frontiers?
Papers should be up to 15 minutes long and may be exploratory or experimental.
Comparison of more than one medieval society is encouraged. Titles and abstracts should be received by 1st February 2018. It may not be possible to accept all submissions. Some travel bursaries are available to allow attendance which might otherwise not be possible, including from outside the UK.
Submissions, as well as any other queries, should be sent to Jonathan Jarrett, School of History, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT, j.jarrett@leeds.ac.uk.

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CFP: Enchanted Environs: Architecture, Automata, and the Art of Mechanical Performance, International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 10-13 May, 2018

l27horlogedesapience28theclockofwisdom29fromabout1450Call for Papers: Enchanted Environs: Architecture, Automata, and the Art of Mechanical Performance, International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 10-13 May, 2018.
Deadline: 15 September 2017.

Sponsored by AVISTA (The Association Villard de Honnecourt for the Interdisciplinary Study of Technology, Science, and Art).

Organized by Zachary Stewart (Texas A&M University) and Amy Gillette (The Barnes Foundation).

Medieval spaces were often sites of spectacular performances animated by various kinds of mechanical installations—the most complex of which featured automata or self-operating devices. Some items survive in material form; the most notable examples are the famous mechanical clocks of Central Europe. Other items survive in textual form; examples range from the singing birds in the palace of Caliph al-Muqtadir, the dancing monkeys in the garden of Count Robert II of Artois, and the bowing angel in the coronation pavilion of King Richard II of England to the Throne of Solomon of Middle Byzantine Constantinople, the ritual statues of late medieval Spain, and the liturgical set-pieces of late medieval Italy. This session, enriched by the work of scholars such as Jean Gimpel and, more recently, Scott Lightsey and Elly Truitt, seeks to revisit the issue of mechanical installations as it relates to the history of the built environment—an area of academic research in which studies of human performance are many but studies of non-human performance are few. The working conceit of the session will be that of the Wunderkammer. Participants will deliver a series of shorter papers in order to facilitate a wide-ranging exploration of mechanical invention in the medieval world: Latin, Byzantine, and Islamic. Possible topics of inquiry may include individual case studies, modes of production and/or reception, and larger questions of historical evidence (physical, textual, and visual) and/or historical significance (political, social, and economic). Especially desirable are contributions involving technical reconstructions (analog or digital), theoretical speculations (phenomenological or ontological), and, in keeping with the mission of AVISTA, investigations of famous polymaths such as Ismail al-Jazari, Villard d’Honnecourt, and Leonardo da Vinci.

Please send an abstract (500 words max) and a Participant Information Form to Zachary Stewart (zstewart@arch.tamu.edu) and Amy Gillette (agillette@barnesfoundation.org) by 15 September 2017.

AVISTA is pleased to offer the annual, merit-based Villard de Honnecourt Award for the outstanding paper by a graduate student in an AVISTA session at the ICMS at Kalamazoo. It is based on evaluation of the candidate’s abstract and CV. This award, which comes with a $500 honorarium, is intended to further young talent in the study of medieval technology, science, and art. The Society is also pleased to offer up to two $500 grants-in-aid to graduate students or independent scholars to defray costs of attending the ICMS at Kalamazoo. Application for one of these grants consists of a 300-word statement of need and CV, which should be submitted to the session organizer(s) by September 15, 2017, together with the paper abstract and PIF form.

CFP: Topics in the History of Nobility, Knighthood, and Heraldica: A Session in Honor of D’Arcy Jonathan Dacre Boulton, University of Notre Dame, Medieval Institute Sponsored Session at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018

wernigeroder_wappenbuch_022vCall for Papers: “Topics in the History of Nobility, Knighthood, and Heraldica: A Session in Honor of D’Arcy Jonathan Dacre Boulton” University of Notre Dame, Medieval Institute Sponsored Session at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018
Deadline: 15 September 2017

As many may be aware, Professor Jonathan Boulton recently retired from teaching at the University of Notre Dame.  In celebration of his achievements, and to honor his rich service to the community of students and scholars at the University of Notre Dame, the graduate students in the Medieval Institute are sponsoring a session of papers for next year’s ICMS in grateful recognition of Professor Boulton’s deep contributions to the study of heraldry and medieval knighthood as well as of his legacy and passion as a teacher in these fields.

The theme most appropriate to this occasion is “Topics in the History of Nobility, Knighthood, and Heraldica,” which encompasses both the early and later middle ages and allows for inquiry in a diversity of potential subjects, including the development of martial/courtly ethos, the visual and literary rhetoric of heraldry across multiple media, legal practices governing armigery and display of arms, the political and sociological dimensions of knightly orders, and the atavistic or nostalgic appropriation of heraldric symbols and discources in later centuries.

This broad and inclusive theme is especially fitting, given Professor Boulton’s lifetime dedication as a teacher and a scholar to illuminating the critical role played by evolving concepts of knighthood and nobility in a range of historical developments throughout the middle ages.

We welcome submissions from scholars in all disciplines and fields of inquiry.  Please send abstracts for the seession to Christopher Scheirer (cscheire@nd.edu)

CFP: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan

bean20ms120-20folio2080l20-20liturgy20of20the20deadCall for Papers: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: 15 September 2017
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium at the University of Virginia invites graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars to submit papers for a session entitled “Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance” at the 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Abstracts of up to 250 words for a 15-20-minute paper should be submitted on or before September 15, 2017 via Google Forms (visit http://bit.ly/liturgyform). All entries will undergo blinded peer review. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decisions via email by Friday, September 22.

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

This panel turns on a rather simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? The howls of dissent rise up – Who would ask such a thing? The answer is both, of course! In response, this panel invites graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars to respond to the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide the future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Among other concerns, how are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? In what ways do liturgical texts both organize and find their roots in ritual reenactments that involve procession, genuflection, and acts of proskynesis? What episodes and anecdotes from the Middle Ages reveal how liturgical text is entangled with the environment in which it is read, sung, translated, or performed?

The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions. Since unpacking the meaning of a somatic study of liturgy is the prime goal of the session, participants may use movement, travel, and the kineticism of objects as organizing principles for their work or ask how scholars actually perform or participate in the liturgies they study. Interesting avenues include discussions of the materiality of liturgy, from enduring forms to ephemera, via a close look at manuscripts, printed books, sacred instruments, vestments, relics, urban layouts, decorations for processions, and the architecture of churches, chapels, and tombs. We particularly invite work that pushes the boundary of what is currently considered the purview of “liturgy and ritual studies,” explores some aspect of space and sound, and pertains to the smell, touch, and taste of the liturgy in North Africa, Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Russia, and the Byzantine world.

Session co-chairs:
Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu) and DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)

CfP: Gender & Medieval Studies Conference 2018, University of Oxford

GENDER AND MEDIEVAL STUDIES CONFERENCE 2018GENDER, IDENTITY, ICONOGRAPHY:

CALL FOR PAPERS

Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford

8th-10th January 2018

The glittering beauty of the Alfred Jewel, the rich illustration of the Lindisfarne Gospels, the dominating Great West Window of York Minster, the intricate embroidery of the Bayeux Tapestry, the luminous Maestà of Duccio, the opulent Oseberg ship burial, and the sophisticated imagery of the Ruthwell cross are all testament to the centrality of the visual to our understanding of a range of medieval cultures.

Constructed at and across the intersections of race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, national identity, age, social class, and economic status, gendered medieval identities are multiple, mobile, and multivalent. Iconography – both religious and secular – plays a key role in the representation of such multifaceted identities. But visual symbols do not merely represent personhood. Across the range of medieval media, visual symbolism is used actively to produce, inscribe, and express the gendered identities of both individuals and groups.

The 2018 Gender and Medieval Studies Conference welcomes papers on all aspects of gender, identity and iconography from those working on medieval subjects in any discipline.

Papers may address, but are not limited to:

· Sight and Blindness

· Visible and Invisible Identities

· Visual Languages

· Colour and Shade

· Icons and Iconoclasm

· Light and Darkness

· Collective and Individual Identities

· Orthodox and Heretical imagery

· Aesthetics

· Subject and Motif

· Convention and Innovation

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Please email proposals of approx. 200 words to gmsconference2018@gmail.com by Monday 4 September 2017. We will also consider proposals for alternative kinds of presentation, including full panel proposals, performance and art; please contact the organisers to discuss.

A conference for everyone

Corpus Christi College’s auditorium is fully wheelchair accessible, has accessible toilets, and features a hearing loop for those using hearing aids. Please contact us if you have specific accessibility needs you would like to discuss. We plan to provide a private lactation space.

It is hoped that the Kate Westoby Fund will be able to offer a modest contribution towards (but not the full costs of) as many postgraduate student travel expenses as possible. We are exploring other avenues to make the conference financially feasible for postgraduates and early career scholars to attend.

CfP: Memory and Lineage in Medieval Romance, Leeds IMC 2018

The 25th Leeds International Medieval Congress has a special thematic strand of ‘memory’. Medieval romance lends itself to thinking about memory, in many ways, and not least because of its preoccupation with lineage. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspect of memory and/or lineage in medieval romance. The brief is deliberately broad, so please feel free to interpret according to your interest. Some thematic and theoretical approaches to consider may be: 

– inheritance / heritage / legacy

– remembering and recognition

– family histories and family politics

– textual lineage.

Please email proposals (250 words max.) to Kirsty Bolton (University of Southampton) and Grace Timperley (University of Manchester) at lineageinromance@gmail.com by 25 August 2017. 

CfP, Louvre Study Day: Collecting Medieval Sculpture, 23rd – 24th Nov 2017

Musée du Louvre, Paris, November 23 – 24, 2017
Deadline: Aug 15, 2017

Ards Study Day 2017
Collecting Medieval Sculpture

Ards, M-Museum Leuven (B) is launching a Call for papers for the 4th
annual colloquium ‘Current research in medieval and renaissance
sculpture’, which will be held in the Musée du Louvre in Paris (FR) on
November 24th  2017.

During the colloquium we will be having keynote speakers on the topic
and a selection of submitted papers in plenum. One day before, on
November 23rd, we will have the opportunity to visit the magnificent
collection of medieval sculpture in the Arts décoratifs Muséum in Paris
as well as other suggested excursions.

This year we are inviting all researchers and curators working
specifically on and with specific sculpture collections or collectors
to submit papers. Firstly, we want to take a look at collecting
medieval sculpture. How did or do medieval sculpture collections get
formed? How has medieval sculpture been collected in the past
(including in the middle ages and renaissance period) and how is this
evolving right now?
We know the prices on the art market are slowly rising as medieval
sculpture is becoming increasingly more interesting as an investment.
Can we take a closer look at what’s happening in that area? In december
2014 the Getty Museum acquired a rare medieval alabaster sculpture of
Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece at Sotheby’s for no
less than 542,500 GBP. If a small statuette by an anonymous master can
generate this kind of money at a sale, this must mean the ‘market’ for
medieval sculpture is shifting thoroughly.
Moreover, does the exhibition or publication of medieval sculpture
influence this trend? It is a fact that the more we know about an art
piece or artist, the more interesting it becomes to buy or exhibit
them. What are the motifs or instigating factors for museums and
private collectors to collect this intrinsiquely religiously inspired
and therefore (?) ‘less attractive’ discipline. Links can be drawn to
the abolition of churchly instances at the end of the 19th century and
the gothic revival in the 19th century, the export of mainland
patrimony to the United Kingdom.

Would you like to submit a paper for this conference? Your proposal can
be of an art-historical, historical as well as a technical or
scientific nature. Multidisciplinarity is encouraged.

Priority will be given to speakers presenting new findings and
contributions relevant to the specific conference theme. The conference
committee, consisting of sculpture curators from M – Museum Leuven will
select papers for the conference. Submissions that are not selected for
presentation in plenum, can still be taken into consideration for
(digital) poster presentation.There are no fees, nor retribution of
transport and/or lodging costs for the selected papers. After the
conference, presentations will be shared online with the Ards-network
on the website, so please make sure your pictures are copyright cleared.

How to submit your proposal?
– Write in English or French. Presentations are given in English or
French.
– Include a short CV.
– Max. 500 words for abstracts
(excl. authors name(s) and contact details).
– E-mail to marjan.debaene@leuven.be.
– Deadline: 31.08.17.
Successful applicants will receive a notification by 15.09.17.
For more info, visit www.ards.be