Tag Archives: call for papers

CfP: Painted on the wall:  the wall as a visual panel in the Middle Ages

The 11th Complutese Congress on Medieval Art aims to think about the visual function of medieval painted walls, taking into account that they were probably the best mass media in their context.

It will pay attention to the following topics: iconography, techniques, forms and expressive resources, socio-cultural context, preservation and the museum exhibition system.

There will be six sessions:

  • Session I: A multidisciplinary approach to medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Fernando Gutiérrez Baños (Univ. Valladolid)
  • Session II: Territory and medieval wall painting: centre and periphery. Invited Conferences of Prof. Jerrilynn Dodds (Sarah Lawrence College) and Dr Carmen Rallo (General Office of Museums of the Nation in Spain)
  • Session III: Function and meaning of the wall painting. Invited Conferences of Prof. Simone Piazza (Univ. Paul Valéry, Montpelier III) and Dr José Miguel Lorenzo Arribas (Scholl of Cultural Heritage in Spain)
  • Session IV: Techniques and colors in the preparations of the wall. Invited Conference of Prof. Rafael Ruiz Alonso (Royal Academy of History and Art of Saint Quirce)
  • Session V: Wall as an occasional support of other artistic techniques. Invited Conference of Prof. Roger Rosewell (Society of Antiquaries of London)
  • Session VI: Heritage: conservation, museums and virtualization of medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Jordi Camps (MNAC)

For more information: https://www.ucm.es/artemedieval/pintadoenlapared

CfP: CITIZEN CATHEDRALS IN THE MIDDLE AGES; Templa Winter School 2017

Please, see the call for papers of the Templa Winter School, “Citizen Cathedrals in the Middle Ages. Image, institutions, networks” (Girona, December 18th-19th 2017), organized by members of our Research Team (V. Debiais, X. Granero, A. Moreno, G. Boto).

It is addressed mainly to young researchers whose studies are focused on medieval Cathedrals related to their cities, and vice versa.

As with the Templa Summer School 2015 and 2016, the Templa Team will cover the expenses of all researchers whose papers have been accepted.

 

CFP: Following the Paper Trail? Complexities, Implications and Problems in Interpreting Primary Sources for Artistic Production, Renaissance Sociey of America, 22 to 24 March 2018, New Orleans

tumblr_oqexa0oz8t1syzcjgo1_500CFP: Following the Paper Trail? Complexities, Implications and Problems in Interpreting Primary Sources for Artistic Production, Renaissance Society of America, 22 to 24 March 2018, New Orleans

Organised by: Maggie Crosland, Saida Bondini and Costanza Beltrami, PhD Candidates, The Courtauld Institute of Art

As (art) historians we often use documents as evidence. Indeed, what could offer us more direct information about an object, artwork or building than the records of the material used to construct it, or the payments for its labour?

And yet, the mechanisms through which uniquely useful documents such as inventories, contracts and payment accounts are produced are not always transparent. In fact, these are formulaic documents written within tight conventions, for specific economic or legal ends. In this session, we aim to investigate how these records came to be, how they relate to the objects they purportedly explain and how they influence our perception, analysis and conclusions on the past and its relics.

In proposing this session, we are interested in uncovering what documents hide. For example, a contract must often be the final product of a long and multiple discussion. As such, this document reduces the interaction of several people — masters, family members, advisors, apprentices etc. to the legal agreement between just two, effacing all the other voices as well as the temporal dimension of reflection, creation, and changes of mind.

A goal of this session is to provide a platform through which scholars of different media and geographic location can discuss the complexities and implications of relying on and using primary documents. As such, we are interested in paper proposals that engage with such documents from a range of standpoints.

Suggested topics include:

– The temporal and plural vision of the past as hidden or revealed through documents

– Establishing patron-artist networks through primary sources

– Implications of agency and patronage

– The bureaucratic nature of artist contracts and payment accounts

– Missing conversations – how to look beyond the one-to-one relationship suggested by contracts and payment accounts

–  Reconstructing the lost/missing archive

– Early modern and modern historiography on the use of primary sources

– What information remains hidden in the archive, and what is published and promoted instead? What does this tell us about our changing perception and efforts to shape the past?

To be considered for our panel, please email costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk with:

-The title of your proposed paper (15-word maximum)
– Abstract (150-word maximum)
– 5 keywords
– A very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum), formatted to the RSA’s standards.
Please note that the deadline for applications is June 4, 2017.

CFP: Tardogótico Conference, 15 de maio de 2017

Westminster Abbey's architectural treasures – in picturesSão aceites propostas de comunicação/póster no âmbito das áreas temáticas definidas para o congresso e sobre matérias correlacionadas com as mesmas. Os interessados deverão enviar um resumo, numa das seguintes línguas: português, espanhol, inglês, italiano ou francês (máximo de 300 palavras), incluindo o título, acompanhado de uma breve nota curricular (máximo de 200 palavras) e de cinco palavras-chave.

As propostas devem ser enviadas para o email:
magister.flul@gmail.com  Continue reading

CFP: Final Conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as Places of Transformation” Bamberg, January 11 – 14, 2018

dp300044CFP: Final Conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as Places of Transformation” Bamberg, January 11 – 14, 2018
Deadline: 15 June 2017.

The medieval church portal is in many respects a place of
transformation. At the threshold of a church, various spheres converge
and meet: secular – ecclesiastic, corporeal – spiritual, earthly –
divine. Iconography and formal design offer ample evidence of this
unique situation. At the same time, church portals themselves are
objects of change: their appearances are constantly shifting due to
modification, chromatic reworking and restorative endeavours. After
all, modernism declared portals works of art, and this change of status
was accompanied by a further metamorphosis: The medieval portal became
an aesthetic object and thereby an exhibit with alternative forms of
presentation.

The international final conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as
Places of Transformation” (University of Bamberg, Chair in Medieval Art
History, Professorship in Building Preservation Sciences, Professorship
in Building History and Building Archaeology) will provide various
conference sections focusing on central issues of continuity and change
as they pertain to medieval portals:

Section 1: Conceptual design of medieval portals. The interplay of
architecture and sculpture (building design, design methods,
proportions, room arrangement)

Section 2: Construction of medieval portals. Structural analyses for
the documentation of transformation processes (footing, interlinking of
constructive units, masonry technique, types of stone, structural
analysis, construction process)

Section 3: Iconographic programmes. The portal as a place of spiritual
transformation in the Middle Ages (Iconography, text and image,
eschatological themes, cosmos/cardinal directions)

Section 4: Medieval bronze and wood doors (doors, hinges, mountings,
closing and latching mechanisms)

Section 5: Changing portals. Secular and liturgical use (medieval
procession liturgies, user hierarchy, liturgical dramas and legal acts)

Section 6: Adaptations, alterations and modifications of portals
(restoration layers, renovation measures, surface treatments,
maintenance, supplementation using copies, copying techniques in stone,
plaster und synthetic materials)

Section 7: The portal as a work of art (museum displays, illuminations,
repurposing, virtual presentations and representations)

The conference languages are German, English and French. Please send
your abstract (max. 1500-2000 characters, including spaces) to
Katja.Schroeck@uni-bamberg.de no later than 15 June 2017.

CFP: Bishops’ Identities, Careers and Networks, University of Aberdeen, 26 May and 27 May 2017

cropped-welwick-crosierCall for Papers: Conference: Bishops’ Identities, Careers and Networks
Centre for Scandinavian Studies, University of Aberdeen
26 May and 27 May 2017

Bishops were powerful individuals who had considerable spiritual, economic and political power. To be a bishop was to be a leader who might crown kings or foment rebellion. So who became bishops? What were their family backgrounds, educational attainment, social networks? What was the impact of international Church events such as the Great Schism or the Council of Basle on the types of bishop appointed in individual dioceses?

The aim of this two-day conference, funded by an AHRC Early Career Research Grant, is to stimulate discussion on how individuals achieved a bishopric in Europe, including Scandinavia and the British Isles. An edited volume is the planned outcome for the conference.

Topics for the conference include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Family origins
  • Education
  • Pre-episcopal careers
  • Social networks
  • Spiritual networks
  • Political networks
  • the centralisation of the Papacy
  • international Church events
  • Diocesan patrons
  • Election of bishops

We invite proposals between 250-300 words for individual 20 minute papers relating to the conference theme. Please send abstracts to bishopscareersnetworks@gmail.com.

Please send abstracts by Friday 27th January 2017.

Please direct any queries to Sarah Thomas and Michael Frost at bishopscareersnetworks@gmail.com.

 

 

CFP: Mobility and Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, University of Oxford, 23 June 2017

Call for Papers: Mobility and Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Oxford University, 23 June 2017

Deadline for submissions: 1 February 2017

The application of spatial paradigms to the study of late medieval and early modern societies is now well underway. In contrast, the so-called ‘mobility turn’ has struggled to find its way from the social sciences to the humanities and particularly to disciplines concerned with the study of the past. This conference proposes to bring the two together by exploring how everyday mobility contributed to the shaping of late medieval and early modern spaces, and how spatial frameworks affected the movement of people in pre-modern Europe.

In focusing on these issues, the conference also intends to relate to current social challenges. The world is now more mobile than ever, yet it is often argued that more spatial boundaries exist today than ever before. The conference hopes to reflect on this contemporary paradox by exploring the long-term history of the tension between the dynamism of communities, groups and individuals, and the human construction of places and boundaries.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit proposals of no more than 300 words for 20-minute papers. Papers may engage with questions of mobility and space at a variety of levels (regional, urban, domestic) and interdisciplinary approaches are particularly encouraged.

Potential sub-topics may include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Performing space through movement (border patrols, civic and religious processions, frontier trespassing)
  • Mobile practices in public spaces (itinerant courts, temporary fairs, diplomatic exchanges, travelling performances, revolts on the move)
  • Narrating movement, imagining space (pilgrimage guides, travel diaries, merchant itineraries, road maps)
  • Digital scholarship in exploring the intersections between mobility and space (network analysis, flow modelling, GIS-based research)


Please send your proposal and a brief bio
 to luca.zenobi@history.ox.ac.uk & pablo.gonzalezmartin@history.ox.ac.uk.