Tag Archives: digital humanities

CFP: Rutgers Art Review Volume 36

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Deadline: Sep 15, 2018
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Call for Papers and Digital Projects

Rutgers Art Review, a journal of graduate research in art history, hereby invites all current graduate students, as well as professionals who have completed their doctoral degree within the past year, to submit papers for its 36th edition.

Papers may address all topics and historical periods within the history of art and architecture, visual and material culture, art theory and criticism, aesthetics, film, and photography. Interdisciplinary studies concerning art and architecture written by students in other fields are also welcome. To be considered for publication, submissions must present original contributions to existing scholarship and conform to our submission guidelines. We encourage authors to ask a faculty member to review their paper before submission.
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JOB: Postdoctoral Fellowship in Medieval Art and Digital Humanities, Toronto

University of Toronto Mississauga, September 17, 2018 – September 1, 2020

Application deadline: Jul 15, 2018

The Department of Visual Studies at the University of Toronto Mississauga offers a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in medieval art, with a focus on Digital Humanities and web-based technologies. The Fellow will have an established track record in his/her/their own discipline and/or Digital Humanities. Qualifications for the position include excellent writing and communication skills, expertise in an area of medieval visual culture (broadly defined as European, Byzantine, Islamic art and architecture or related fields), and experience working with Drupal and information architecture.
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Conference: Roads, Routes and Networks: Visualizing Art Historical Information, Cambridge, MA (30 April 2018)

Roads, Routes and Networks: Visualizing Art Historical Information
Digital Humanities Colloquium

Cambridge (MA), Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University, RCC Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge St., April 30, 2018

Space and movement have always been fundamental for art history, through concepts such as center and periphery, roads for global exchange, or the experience of travel, among others. Geographical Information Systems are transforming the traditional ways to visualize these disciplinary discourses about dissemination, innovation and evolution. Network analysis is bringing to light people and places that had been very relevant in their own time as nodes for exchange or partnership, but have been usually overlooked by the focus on a few big names. Vast and quickly increasing amounts of digital data invite experimentation about their uses for teaching and research in the humanities. New challenges are appearing, such as ensuring the sustainability of digital resources and their interoperability, while guaranteeing open access to cultural information. The three case studies represented in the colloquium will provide an update on new and ongoing projects in this area, and introduce a shared reflection about the possibilities of digital information within art history.
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CFP: Digital Humanities for Academic and Curatorial Practice (Rome, 23 – 24 May 18)

Biblioteca Angelica di Roma and American Academy in Rome, Italy, May 23 – 24, 2018
Deadline: Mar 1, 2018
DIGITAL HUMANITIES FOR ACADEMIC AND CURATORIAL PRACTICE

The Digital Humanities have challenged all disciplines of Art History to engage with new interdisciplinary methodologies, learn new tools, and re-evaluate their role within academia. In consequence, art historians occupy a new position in relation to the object of study. Museums have been equally transformed. The possibilities of creating virtual realities for lost/inaccessible monuments poses a new relationship between viewer and object in gallery spaces. Digital Humanities interventions in museums even allow us to preserve the memory of endangered global heritage sites which cease to exist or are inaccessible (celebrated examples including the lost Great Arch of Palmyra reconstructed with a 3D printer). Curatorial practices are now trending towards a sensorial and experiential approach.

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Fellowships at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies

220px-villa_i_tatti2c_ext-2c_giardino_05Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy is now accepting fellowship applications for the 2018–2019 academic year.
Deadline: November 15

Wallace Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore the historiography and impact of the Italian Renaissance in the Modern Era (19th–21st centuries).

Berenson Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore “Italy in the World”. Projects should address the transnational dialogues between Italy and other cultures (e.g. Latin American, Mediterranean, African, Asian, etc.) during the Renaissance, broadly understood historically to include the period from the 14th to the 17th century.

Digital Humanities Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for projects that cut across traditional disciplinary boundaries and actively employ digital technology. Applicants can be scholars in the humanities or social sciences, librarians, archivists, and data science professionals. Projects should apply digital technologies such as mapping, textual analysis, visualization, or the semantic web to topics on any aspect of the Italian Renaissance.

Villa I Tatti – Boğaziçi University Joint Fellowship (one year; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral research focusing on the interaction between Italy and the Byzantine Empire (ca. 1300 to ca. 1700). Scholars will spend a semester at Villa I Tatti and a semester at the Byzantine Studies Research Center of Boğaziçi University.

Craig Hugh Smyth Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for curators and conservators. Projects can address any aspect of the Italian Renaissance art or architecture, including landscape architecture.

David and Julie Tobey Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for research on drawings, prints, and illustrated manuscripts from the Italian Renaissance, and especially the role that these works played in the creative process, the history of taste and collecting, and questions of connoisseurship.

For more information on all fellowships at Villa I Tatti please visit http://itatti.harvard.edu/fellowships

Conference: Intertwined Worlds: 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age

Conference: Intertwined Worlds: 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age, Free Library of Philadelphia/University of Pennsylvania Libraries, November 2-4, 2017

In partnership with the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Schoenberg Institute of Manuscript Studies (SIMS) at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries is pleased to announce the 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age.

Despite the linguistic and cultural complexity of many regions of the premodern world, religion supplies the basis of a strong material and textual cohesion that both crosses and intertwines boundaries between communities. This symposium will highlight the confluence of expressions of belief, ritual, and social engagement emerging in technologies and traditions of the world’s manuscript cultures, often beyond a single religious context. It will consider common themes and practices of textual, artistic, literary, and iconographic production in religious life across time and geography, from ancient precedents to modern reception and dissemination in the digital age.

The program will begin Thursday evening at 5:00 pm on November 2nd, 2017, at the Free Library of Philadelphia, Parkway Central Library, with a keynote lecture by Phyllis Granoff, Yale University. The symposium will continue November 3rd-4th at the Kislak Center of Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries.

Speakers include:

  • Iqbal Akhtar, Florida International University
  • Paul Dilley, University of Iowa
  • Ellen Gough, Emory University
  • Thibaud d’Hubert, University of Chicago
  • Zsuzsanna Gulácsi, Northern Arizona University
  • Ayesha Irani, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • Shazia Jagot, University of Surrey
  • Samantha Kelly, Rutgers University
  • Jinah Kim, Harvard University
  • Gila Prebor, Bar-Ilan University
  • Michael Pregill, Boston University
  • Michael Stanley-Baker, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
  • Columba Stewart, Hill Museum & Monastic Library and Saint John’s University
  • Justine Walden, University of Toronto
  • Tyler Williams, University of Chicago
  • Saymon Zakaria, Bangla Academy, Dhaka
  • Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet, Bar-Ilan University

Click here for program and abstracts.


Registration fee will be $35 ($10 for students with valid student ID). Registration open now until Nov 3, 2017. Click here to register. Walk-in registrations will be accepted for a fee of $45 ($15 for students with valid student ID) to be paid in cash.

The symposium is made possible with the generous support of the Center for Ancient Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

For more information on the Schoenberg Symposium Series, click here.

New Illuminated Manuscript Digitisation Project with British Library & BnF: Polonsky Foundation

The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700-1200

A new project is underway to open up further the unparalleled collections of illuminated manuscripts held by the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France. In a ground-breaking new collaborative project the national libraries of Britain and France will work together to create two innovative new websites that will make 800 manuscripts decorated before the year 1200 available freely. The Bibliothèque nationale de France will create a new bilingual website that will allow side-by-side comparison of 400 manuscripts from each collection, selected for their beauty and interest. The British Library will create a bilingual website intended for a general audience that will feature highlights from the most important of these manuscripts and articles commissioned by leading experts in the field. Both websites will be online by November 2018.

Before the introduction of printing to Europe, all books were written by hand as manuscripts. The most luxurious of these were illuminated, literally ‘lit up’ by decorations and pictures in brightly coloured pigments and burnished gold leaf. All manuscripts — whether they are luxurious biblical or liturgical manuscripts, copies of classical literature or patristic, theological, historical or scientific texts — are valuable historical documents that can deepen and expand our understanding of the political, social and cultural life of the eras in which they were made. Their research value is inestimable.

The British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France have two of the largest collections of medieval manuscripts in the world. As a result of France and England being so closely entwined through periods of war, conquest and alliance and, in the medieval period, both nations claiming territory in France at times, both libraries have particularly strong holdings of French manuscripts produced in France or in Britain (but written in French or Latin).

tours

Decorated initial ‘I’(nitium) from western France, perhaps Brittany or Tours, 9th century (British Library Egerton MS 609, f. 46r).

 

This new project will add to the growing numbers of manuscript material available in full online as part of wider programmes to make these cultural treasures available to everyone around the world. At the British Library, over 8,000 items are currently available on our Digitised Manuscripts website. Similarly, thousands of items are available from the Bibliothèque nationale de France collections on its website, Gallica.

This exciting project is made possible by a generous grant from The Polonsky Foundation. Dr Leonard Polonsky remarks that ‘our Foundation is privileged to be supporting these two leading institutions in preserving the riches of the world’s cultural heritage and making them available in innovative and creative ways, both to scholars and to a wider public’.

The Polonsky Foundation is a UK-registered charity which primarily supports cultural heritage, scholarship in the humanities and social sciences, and innovation in higher education and the arts. Its principal activities include the digitisation of significant collections at leading libraries (the British Library; the Bibliothèque nationale de France; the Bodleian Library, Oxford; Cambridge University Library; the New York Public Library; the Library of Congress; the Vatican Apostolic Library); support for Theatre for a New Audience at the Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn, New York; and post-doctoral fellowships at The Polonsky Academy for the Advanced Study of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. Its founder and chairman, Dr Leonard S. Polonsky, was named a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) for charitable services in 2013.

The focus on the digitisation project will be on manuscripts produced on either side of the English Channel between 700 and 1200. The manuscripts from this period open up a window on a time of close cultural and political exchange during which scribes moved and worked in what is now France, Normandy and England. Decorated manuscripts containing literary, historical, biblical and theological texts will be included, representing the mutual strengths of the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Online access to these manuscripts will support new research into how manuscripts — and people — travelled around Europe in this period. New connections will be made possible by studying the two collections side by side.

For example, the manuscripts selected will include a number of illuminated Gospel-books, providing a witness to the changing tastes, influences and borrowings reflected in the books’ design and script. So a 9th-century, a 10th-century and a late 12th-century Gospel-book all have colourful illuminated initials with geometric patterns, floral decoration or animals heads, yet their execution is very different. The script, colours, style and subjects of the illumination all provide clues to the time and place of their composition. With the digitisation of manuscripts all these features may be studied and enjoyed in detail.

As well as making 800 manuscripts freely available online, the project will be part of a wider programme of activities aimed at researchers and the general public. A number of the manuscripts digitised will be displayed in a major international exhibition on Anglo-Saxon England to be held at the British Library from October 2018 to February 2019, which will highlight connections between Anglo-Saxon England and the Continent.

A conference at the British Library will coincide with the Anglo-Saxon exhibition (December 2018), and a project conference will be held at the Bibliothèque nationale de France. An illustrated book showcasing beautiful and significant manuscripts from the collections will also be produced. Another output will be a film on the digitisation project that, together with the other aspects of the public programme, will open up new paths into collections for a variety of audiences.

The original version of this blog post in the British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog can be found here.

Adapted for Medieval Art Research blog by Amy Jeffs

Original text by Tuija Ainonen

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