Tag Archives: Textiles

Call for Applications: 9th Bern Research Camp for the Applied Arts (Bern, 16–18 May 2019)

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9th Bern Research Camp for the Applied Arts
16 May–18 May 2019, University of Bern, Institute of Art History, Department History of Textile Arts

From the 18th century onwards, the concept of the genius and a preference for the “autonomous” art work led to a separation of the so-called fine arts (painting, sculpture, and architecture) from the applied, decorative or minor arts (gold- and silversmiths’ work, ivories, ceramics, furniture, textiles). The distinction gravely affected the choice of subjects and themes for art-historical research, and crafted objects continue to receive only marginal attention in academic art history, although they were held in high esteem by contemporary patrons, often commanded extremely high prices and played important roles in the representation of both the nobility and wealthy citizens.

The term “treasure art” not only reflects the material value and the extraordinary skills, even virtuosity, manifest in these objects; they often were of particular importance in situations that recent historical research has addressed with a view to symbolical communication and to aspects of performance/performativity. Studies that take the situative and performative contexts into account for which these objects were intended and in which they took effect, have therefore achieved more differentiated evaluations. In recent years, aspects of material culture and materiality have been considered or reconsidered in many disciplines of the humanities; art history in particular has re-established its competence in the study of objects. Analyses of the material qualities of art works, their effects and functions, of specific techniques, the organization of processes and workshop practices substantiate this renewed interest.

Founded in 2009, the Abegg-Stiftung’s Chair for the History of Textile Arts (Prof. Dr. Birgitt Borkopp-Restle) aims at establishing and encouraging an academic discourse on the applied arts from the early middle ages to the present. Material and technical aspects of the applied arts as well as their specific uses, functions and meanings in artistic, historical and political contexts are at the core of the department’s research and teaching. We explicitly seek to contribute to current interdisciplinary discourses on material culture and cultural transfer in the humanities, to studies on the history and practice of collecting and presenting art works, on concepts of space and performativity.

The Bern Research Camp for the Applied Arts, held annually since 2010, invites young scholars whose MA and PhD projects focus on object-based research in the applied arts. The workshop offers them a unique opportunity to present current projects to an audience of young scholars, academics and curators. We propose intensive discussions both of individual projects and of overarching questions and methodological approaches relevant for our themes, and actively encourage networking among the participants and with experienced scholars in the field. The program of presentations and discussions will be complemented by a visit to the Abegg-Stiftung, Riggisberg.

Please send us your proposal for a 30-minute presentation containing a description of your project and your methodological approach (not exceeding 300 words) and a short CV as a pdf-file until 28 February 2019.

Funding will be provided for the participants’ accommodation in Bern; if possible, we will also contribute to your travelling costs.

Please address proposals and questions to:
nora.rudolf@ikg.unibe.ch

New Book: The Power of Textiles: Tapestries of the Burgundian Dominions

The Power of Textiles: Tapestries of the Burgundian Dominions (1363-1477)

By Katherine Anne Wilson

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ISBN 978-2-503-53393-3

More Info: http://bit.ly/2qCFz0a

Textiles were used as markers of distinction throughout the Middle Ages and their production was of great economic importance to emerging and established polities. This book explores tapestry in one of the greatest textile producing regions, the Burgundian Dominions, c.1363-1477. It uses documentary evidence to reconstruct and analyse the production, manufacture, and use of tapestry. It begins by identifying the suppliers of tapestry to the dukes of Burgundy and their ability to spin webs between city and court. It proceeds by considering the forms of tapestry and their functions for urban and courtly consumers. It then observes the ways in which tapestry constructed social relations as part of gift-giving strategies. It concludes by exploring what the re-use, repair, and remaking of tapestry reveals about its value to urban and courtly consumers. By taking an object-centred approach through documentary sources, this book emphasises that the particular characteristics of tapestry shaped the strategies of those who supplied it and the ways it performed and constructed social relations. Thus, the book offers a contribution to the historical understanding of textiles as objects that contributed to the projection of social status and the cultural construction of political authority in the Burgundian polity.

Katherine Anne Wilson is Senior Lecturer in Medieval History at the University of Chester. Her research interests lie in understanding the relationship between social and cultural change, and shifting patterns in the use of material culture in the later Middle Ages. She has worked and published on the circulation of tapestry and luxury goods of the Burgundian Netherlands as well as the biographies of their producers and consumers.

#MetGala In All Its Glory

We’ve now had a week to digest the photos, the fashion, and the inevitable memes of Met Gala 2018. Hopefully a week has been enough time to take in the weird, wonderful, and worshipful experience that was this year’s annual fundraiser for the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute. Each year the gala’s theme is based on the Institute’s summer exhibition, and on 10 May Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination opened at both the Met’s 5th Avenue and Cloisters locations. Kim Kardashian was compared to a Eucharist chalice, haloes abounded, and ‘Rihanna going full pope’ is now a phrase.

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10 Must-See Temporary Exhibitions this Summer

The end of term is in sight and the days are getting longer. And that means we’re all daydreaming of summer. Whether your summer plans call for research or relaxation, take advantage of some stellar temporary exhibitions happening around the globe that are highlighting the production, context, and craftsmanship of medieval art. These exhibitions are pushing boundaries, considering new contexts, and boasting bold feats—several of these exhibitions present artworks on view in North America and Europe for the first time. Let us know your favourites by sharing your thoughts in the comments below. Happy Summer!

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CONF: Il Pallio di San Lorenzo (Florence, 1-2 Feb 18)

Florence, Opificio delle Pietre Dure / Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, February 1 – 02, 2018

Il Pallio di San Lorenzo: Dopo il restauro e prima del suo ritorno a Genova
Workshop

pallio.jpgThis workshop focuses on the so-called ‘Pallio di San Lorenzo’, a thirteenth-century Byzantine textile given to the Cathedral of San Lorenzo in Genoa within the framework of diplomatic relations between Genoa and the Byzantine court. The bright red samite embroidered with various coloured silk threads, as well threads in silver and gold, represents the Lives of St. Lawrence, St. Sixtus, and St. Hippolytus, accompanied by Latin inscriptions, and a depiction of Michael VIII Palaiologos visiting the cathedral of Genoa. The textile’s actual state of preservation after many years of meticulous restoration and the results of the recent analyses of the dye, the stitching technique, and the precious metal threads provides insight into  its unique materiality. Furthermore, its specific iconography, Latin paleography, and possible functions offer various points of departure for a comprehensive reconsideration of the Pallio. This work epitomizes the transcultural encounters in the Mediterranean. This interdisciplinary workshop, organized in collaboration with the textile restoration experts of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure and the Museo Sant’Agostino, Genoa, is an extraordinary occasion to discuss the results of the restoration of the ‘Pallio di San Lorenzo’ before its return to Genoa.

A collaboration between the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, Firenze, the Museo di Sant’Agostino, Genova and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut
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Call for papers “Arte y producción textil en el Mediterráneo Medieval”

Arte y produccion textilInternational conference “Arte y producción textil en el Mediterráneo Medieval”

Madrid, Museo del Traje. CIPE, 25-27 September 2018

Deadline: 15 March 2018

This conference aims to analyse medieval textile production from a cross-sectoral approach, focusing on the Mediterranean as an area of confluences that gave rise to varied manufactures with common links. This meeting, which will be attended by international specialists on textile research, proposes to re-examine assumptions on the production, functionality and circulation of these luxury objects. The collecting of these works, with regard to their archaeological and artistic value, as well as textile conservation, will also be under consideration.
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Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018

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Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS, London: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018
All lectures begin at 7.00 p.m. in the Khalili Lecture Theatre (Main School Lecture Theatre) –  unless indicated otherwise – Philips Building, SOAS, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

 

  • 11 October 2017: The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings,’ Dr Tom Nickson, Lecturer in Medieval Art and Architecture, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
  • 15 November 2017: Reviving Islamic Architecture in Khedivial Cairo, and Beyond: a Collector’s Passion, Dr Mercedes Volait, CRNS Research Professor at INHA, Paris
  • 6 December 2017: Takht-e Soleyman/Iran – From Sasanian Fire Temple to Ilkhanid Summer Palace. New Evidence from Old Excavations, Dr Ute Franke,                                       Deputy Director, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Berlin
  • 10 January 2018: The Hadassah and Daniel Khalili Memorial Lecture in Islamic Art and Culture: The Calligrapher, the Painter, and the Patron: A New Perspective on the Freer Khusraw u Shirin, Dr Simon Rettig, Assistant Curator of Islamic Art, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • 21 February 2018: In the service of religion? The display of ‘science from the Islamic world’ in the museum, Dr Silke Ackermann, Director, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford
  • 14 March 2018: The Seventh Bahari Foundation Lecture in Iranian Art and Culture: Decagonal and Quasicrystalline Geometry in the Architecture of Medieval Persia and Its Influence in the Greater Islamic World, Dr Peter J. Lu, Department of Physics and SEAS, Harvard University, USA
  • 25 April 2018: Islamic Textiles from Iberia: Re-evaluating Their Role in the Mediterranean Context, Dr Ana Cabrera-Lafuente, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  • 9 May 2018: Ilse Sturkenboom
  • 13 June 2018: Ahmet Ersoy

For further information please contact Rosalind Wade Haddon: 07714087480 or                 rosalindhaddon@gmail.com