Tag Archives: christianity

Conference: The Body Politics of Mary Magdalen, November 23 – 24, 2017, The Warburg Institute, London

carlo_crivelli_-_maria_magdalena_001Conference: The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London, WC1H 0AB, November 23 – 24, 2017

The Warburg Institute is holding a two-day conference on Mary Magdalen, a figure of great historical importance and cultural resonance. Coming together for this free event, the multidisciplinary speakers will present new research on the representation of her body and its discourses across time and space.
Registration: bit.ly/Mary-Mag

PROGRAMME
Thursday 23 November 2017
5.30pm Welcome and Introduction

Conference keynote:
Penny Jolly (Skidmore College)
“Addressing and Undressing the Female Body in the Magdalene Chapel at San Francesco, Assisi”
Supported by the Coffin Trust, University of London

Reception

Friday 24 November 2017
10am Registration and Coffee
10.30am Welcome and Introduction

Session 1: Chair – Zoe Opacic (Birkbeck)
10.45am
Paper 1: Joan Taylor (KCL)
What did Mary Magdalen look like?
11.30am
Paper 2: Joanne Anderson (WI)
Materialising the Body of the Saint: Pilgrimage Politics and Art

12.15-1.30pm Lunch (for speakers and chairs only)

Session 2: Chair – Rose Marie San Juan (UCL)

1.30pm
Paper 3: Diane Apostolos-Cappadona (Georgetown)
“An ‘athlete of God’ or simply naked?: The Magdalene in the Wilderness from Isenbrandt to Etty”

2.15pm
Paper 4: Francesco Ventrella (Sussex)
Morelli’s Magdalen and the Sexual Politics of Reading

Tea/Coffee – all delegates

Session 3: Chair – Rose Marie San Juan (UCL)

3.30pm
Paper 5: Lucy Bolton (QMUL)
Beautiful repentant whore: Mary Magdalen, Movie Star

4.15pm
Paper 6: Henrietta Simpson (Slade School of Art, UCL)
The Implications of Absence: Mary Magdalen and the Wilderness Landscape

5pm Roundtable chaired by Michelle O’Malley (WI)

6.15-7.30pm
Magdalena. A Portrait in Song of One of Christianity’s Most Beloved Sinners
Joglaresa. Director: Belinda Sykes
Supported by the Coffin Trust, University of London
The Warburg Institute Lecture Room. Refreshments provided

Advertisements

CFP: Walking with saints, Ronse, Belgium, 24-16 May 18

fiertelCall for Papers: Walking with saints, Ronse, Belgium, May 24 – 26, 2018
Deadline: Dec 10, 2017

Walking with saints: protection, devotion and civic identity. The role of the landscape.

Since the adoption of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2003, the issue of cultural practices has increasingly gained the attention of heritage professionals, academics, decision makers and practitioners alike. Many practices, rituals, performances, social traditions, craftsmanship and more have since been put on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage. However, despite the growing interest in the social dimensions of cultural heritage and the recognition of the importance of the intangible aspects of heritage, many issues still need further reflection.  A crucial aspect is the interaction and relationship between intangible cultural heritage and its spatial contexts. This is part of a broader “spatial turn” in historiography and research.
For centuries people in Europa and elsewhere have walked the landscape carrying the relics of martyrs and saints. By doing so they gave meaning to and altered the significance of the land, be it urban or natural, in more ways than we imagine. One of these aspects is the way in which the landscape is transformed by walking it, thus setting paths, reinforcing boundaries, strengthening a community’s identity in relation to a certain landscape or setting the pace of life according to the repetition of the traditional acts in time.
“Walking with saints: protection, devotion and civic identity” focusses on the origin and evolution of procession rites with a strong link with the landscape. This conference, therefore, aims at studying the religious landscape, be it a specific spot or a larger territory, not as the mere spatial background for spiritual activities, but as an active agent in the shaping, transmission and transformation of the spiritual activity of human beings throughout time. Hence, we invite also reflections on developments in the 19th and 20th centuries when a rediscovering of the past, both within and outside the Christian churches, was en vogue and when new ways of looking at the natural landscape were moulded in the aftermath of the industrialisation of the economy.

Though the starting point is an activity that is typical for Europe, we are interested in broadening the perspective to non-Christian and non-Western traditions that have an important connection with the landscape in which they are performed.  It is generally known, for example, that the landscape and natural phenomena play an important role in the traditions of indigenous cultures in Australia, the Americas and Africa. In Asia walking with the statues of gods is a common, though little understood, phenomenon. It is to be expected that these traditions can broaden our understanding of the role of the landscape in the development and sustainability of immaterial heritage.

Papers are invited that deal with the following themes of the conference:
•    Sacralisation of the landscape: alteration, destruction and resistance
•    Immaterial heritage: religion and landscape
•    Perennial aspect of immaterial heritage
•    Immaterial heritage and community building: identity, assimilation, integration
•    Healing saints in their territorial context
•    The influence of processions on the landscape and on the drawing of parochial and city boundaries
•    Processions, pilgrimages and the senses
•    Healing saints, magic and assimilation

The starting point for the conference and the reason why it is held in Ronse is the Fiertel Ommegang. This procession originates from around 1090 A.D. and is yearly held on Trinity Sunday. During a walk of 32, 6 km the inhabitants of Ronse circumscribe the territorial boundaries of the city carrying Saint Hermes’s relics for protection and cure. For ages, the Fiertel has been one of the most important religious activities in the region and it has to date remained a strong symbol of the inhabitant’s civic identity even in times of secularization.
This 3 day conference will be hosted by the city of Ronse and is part of an assessment of the local Fiertel procession as a possible candidate for recognition as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Please submit papers for individual sessions no later than December 10 2017.
Proposals should include
– A paper title of max. 10 words
– A paper abstract of max. 350 words
– A short C.V. of max. 1000 words including current current affiliation and full contact details
All documents should be merged into 1 single PDF file.
Proposals should be sent to papers@wws2018.com

Call for complete session proposals

While the sessions proposed by the conference organisers focus on the western European and Christian traditions we welcome complete session proposals on related themes covering non-Western and non-Christian traditions.
The aim of the conference is not only to study the Fiertel in its local context, but also to trace traditions and rituals which are cross-confessional and transcultural. We hope that this reflection and dialogue will help us to understand the origins of the Fiertel, as a ritual and spiritual quest outdating Christianity.

Full session proposal are to be submitted by December 10 2017.

Proposal should include:
– A session title of max. 10 words
– A session proposal of max. 350 words
– 3 individual paper proposals consisting out of a title of max. 10 words and an abstract of max. 350 words each.
– A CV of max. 1000 words for each: the session organizer and the session participants. The CV should include information on the current affiliation and full contact details.

All documents have to be merged into 1 PDF file.

Proposals should be sent to papers@wws2018.com

Post-Doc: Post-doctoral researcher for the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide study of its origins, spread and development (Latin evidence), University of Warsaw

cult-banner5.jpg
Post-Doc: Post-doctoral researcher for the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide
study of its origins, spread and development (Latin evidence), University of Warsaw
Deadline: 31 September 2017
The Institute of History, University of Warsaw, is seeking to recruit a post-doctoral
researcher for a position in the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide study of
its origins, spread and development. The Project is supported by an Advanced Grant
from the European Research Council under Grant Agreement Number 340540 and is
based at the University of Oxford with a partnership at the University of Warsaw. The successful candidate will work as part of a team of seven post-doctoral researchers reporting to the Principal Investigator, Prof. Bryan Ward-Perkins (University of Oxford), but under direct supervision of Dr. hab. Robert Wiśniewski (University of Warsaw). The postholder will have responsibility for collecting Latin evidence consisting mostly of literary texts, within an electronic searchable database. The postholder is also expected to produce sole-authored articles on aspects of the cult of saints in the West.
This is a full-time time position for 12 months, starting on 1 November 2017 or soon
thereafter. The postholder will be offered the salary of about 2 700 Euros per month.
For more information about the Project see: http://cultofsaints.history.ox.ac.uk
If you have any questions about the project or the recruitment procedure, please
address them to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl)

CFP: Medieval Eurabia: Religious Crosspollinations in Architecture, Art and Material Culture during the High and Late Middle Ages (1000-1600) at Annual Conference of the Association for Art History, UK, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, UK, 5th-7th April, 2018

800px-french_ciborium_with_rim_engraved_with_arabic_script_and_islamic_inspired_diamond_shaped_pattern_limoges_france_1215_1230Call for Papers: Session on Medieval Eurabia: Religious Crosspollinations in Architecture, Art and Material Culture during the High and Late Middle Ages (1000-1600) at Annual Conference of the Association for Art History, UK, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, UK, 5th-7th April, 2018
Deadline:
1st November, 2017

Panel organised by Sami De Giosa, Oxford University and Nikolaos Vryzidis, British
School at Athens
Email: aahchristianmuslimpanel2018@gmail.com
The coexistence of Christianity and Islam in the Medieval Mediterranean led to a
transfer of knowledge in architecture and material culture which went well beyond
religious and geographical boundaries. The use of Islamic objects in Christian
contexts, the conversion of churches into mosques and the mobility of craftsmen are
manifestations of this process. Although studies beginning with Avinoam Shalem’s
Islam Christianized (1996), have dealt extensively with Islamic influence in the West
and European influence in the Islamic Mediterranean, sacred objects, and material
culture more generally, have been relatively neglected. From crosses found in
Mosques, to European-Christian coins with pseudo/-shahada inscriptions, medieval
material culture is rife with visual evidence of the two faiths co-existing in both
individual objects and monuments.
This panel invites papers from scholars working on intercultural exchange in art,
architecture and material culture. We particularly welcome contributions that focus
on sacred objects that have been diverted or ‘converted’ to a new purpose, whether
inside or outside an explicitly religious context.
Papers should present original research, which expands the boundaries of
knowledge and which the scholars would like to be considered for publication.
Abstract should be no more than 250 words long.
 

 

New Book Series: Christianities Before Modernity

 

Challenging the perception of Christianity as a unified and European religion before the sixteenth century, this series interrogates the traditional chronological, geographical, social, and institutional boundaries of premodern Christianity. Books in this series seek to rebuild the lived experiences and religious worlds of understudied people as well as landmark disputes and iconic figures by recovering underappreciated vernacular sources, situating localized problems and mundane practices within broader social contexts, and addressing questions framed by contemporary theoretical and methodological conversations.

Christianities Before Modernity embraces an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, publishing on history, literature, music, theater, classics, folklore, art history, archaeology, religious studies, philosophy, gender studies, anthropology, sociology, and other areas.

Grounded in original sources and informed by ongoing disciplinary disputes, this series demonstrates how premodern Christians comprised diverse and conflicted communities embedded in a religiously diverse world.

Series Editors:

Rabia Gregory, University of Missouri

Kathleen E. Kennedy, Pennsylvania State Brandywine

Susanna A. Throop, Ursinus College

Charlene Villaseñor Black, UCLA

Advisory Board:

Adnan A. Husain, Queen’s University

István Perczel, Central European University

Eyal Poleg, Queen Mary University of London

Carl S. Watkins, Magdalene College, Cambridge

Publisher: MIP, The University Press at Kalamazoo

For more information, visit: https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/christianities-before-modernity/. For questions or to submit a proposal, please contact the acquisitions

editor, Erika Gaffney (Erika.Gaffney@arc‐humanities.org).

 

Current Exhibition: Miracles and Martyrs: Saints in the Middle Ages

00371101Current Exhibition: Miracles and Martyrs: Saints in the Middle Ages

Getty Museum of Art,  September 3, 2013–March 2, 2014

 Throughout the Middle Ages, Christians were fascinated by stories about saints, who led extraordinary lives full of mystical events and miraculous occurrences. Saints were depicted in manuscripts experiencing revelatory visions and performing wondrous feats such as healing the sick or raising the dead. Even when their tormentors were performing exceptionally brutal acts—shooting them repeatedly with arrows, for example, or violently beheading them—martyr saints were pictured remaining steadfast in their faith. This exhibition, drawn from the Getty Museum’s permanent collection, presents manuscripts that allowed medieval viewers to witness these dramatic narratives and venerate the saints as models of piety.

For more information visit http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/saints/

BBC Four: Byzantium: A Tale of Three Cities

CIMG3734

BBC 4: Byzantium: A Tale of Three Cities

Series in which historian Simon Sebag Montefiore traces the sacred history of Istanbul. Known as the ‘city of the world’s desire’, it’s a place that has been the focus of passion for believers of three different faiths – Paganism, Christianity and Islam – and for nearly 3,000 years its streets have been the battleground for some of the fiercest political and religious conflicts in history.

In three episodes Montefiore charts the rise of Istanbul from pagan trading post to capital of three empires and two religions, becoming not only holy but the most coveted city in the world.

For more information see http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03l2shc