Tag Archives: christianity

Conference: Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era, London, November 8–9, 2018

slid-charlatanesVenue: Senate House, Bedford Room 37 (8th Nov); Bush House, KCL S2.01 and Instituto Cervantes (9th Nov)

Keynote speakers: Prof Trevor Dadson and Dr Alexander Samson

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.

Click here for a full programme and here to book tickets

Organisers: Roser López Cruz (King’s College London) and Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Conference website: https://iberianintolerance.com

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Call for Papers: ‘Wounds Visible and Invisible in Late Medieval Christianity’, ICMS 2019 (Deadline: 15 September 2018)

31333806172_4c82f814f2_b54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 9 – 12, 2019
Deadline: 15 September 2018

This session examines the many valences of wounds in late medieval Christianity, focusing on themes surrounding wounds and wounding both visible (corporeal and/or material) and invisible (rhetorical and allegorical). The image of the wounded body held a central place in late medieval Christian practice and material culture; the wounds of the crucified Christ were tangible reminders of his Passion and served as foci of veneration, while stigmatic saints and maimed martyrs were marked as holy by means of bodily trauma. Papers may also consider the Christian response to physical injury, in the form of saintly intervention through healing miracles and medical intervention through the establishment of hospitals and provision of care by religious orders.

Moving beyond the ample possibilities for discussion stemming from the theme of “visible” wounds in medieval Christianity, this session also encourages a broad examination of “invisible” wounds within the late medieval Christian context. Examples might range from the accusations of metaphorical violence levied against the mendicant orders by antifraternal critics, to the conceptualization of the Western Schism as a wound to the Church. By exploring wounds both “visible” and “invisible,” this session elicits the perspectives of scholars of history, art history, literature, and theology and seeks to expand conceptions of wounds and injury within a late medieval Christian framework.

Please send a brief proposal (300 words max) and a participant information form (currently available at https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to Hannah Wood at Hannah.wood@mail.utoronto.ca and Johanna Pollick at j.pollick.1@research.gla.ac.uk by 15th September 2018.

As per ICMS rules, any abstracts not accepted for our session will be forwarded for consideration for General Sessions.

#MetGala In All Its Glory

We’ve now had a week to digest the photos, the fashion, and the inevitable memes of Met Gala 2018. Hopefully a week has been enough time to take in the weird, wonderful, and worshipful experience that was this year’s annual fundraiser for the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute. Each year the gala’s theme is based on the Institute’s summer exhibition, and on 10 May Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination opened at both the Met’s 5th Avenue and Cloisters locations. Kim Kardashian was compared to a Eucharist chalice, haloes abounded, and ‘Rihanna going full pope’ is now a phrase.

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10 Must-See Temporary Exhibitions this Summer

The end of term is in sight and the days are getting longer. And that means we’re all daydreaming of summer. Whether your summer plans call for research or relaxation, take advantage of some stellar temporary exhibitions happening around the globe that are highlighting the production, context, and craftsmanship of medieval art. These exhibitions are pushing boundaries, considering new contexts, and boasting bold feats—several of these exhibitions present artworks on view in North America and Europe for the first time. Let us know your favourites by sharing your thoughts in the comments below. Happy Summer!

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Conference: The Body Politics of Mary Magdalen, November 23 – 24, 2017, The Warburg Institute, London

carlo_crivelli_-_maria_magdalena_001Conference: The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London, WC1H 0AB, November 23 – 24, 2017

The Warburg Institute is holding a two-day conference on Mary Magdalen, a figure of great historical importance and cultural resonance. Coming together for this free event, the multidisciplinary speakers will present new research on the representation of her body and its discourses across time and space.
Registration: bit.ly/Mary-Mag

PROGRAMME
Thursday 23 November 2017
5.30pm Welcome and Introduction

Conference keynote:
Penny Jolly (Skidmore College)
“Addressing and Undressing the Female Body in the Magdalene Chapel at San Francesco, Assisi”
Supported by the Coffin Trust, University of London

Reception

Friday 24 November 2017
10am Registration and Coffee
10.30am Welcome and Introduction

Session 1: Chair – Zoe Opacic (Birkbeck)
10.45am
Paper 1: Joan Taylor (KCL)
What did Mary Magdalen look like?
11.30am
Paper 2: Joanne Anderson (WI)
Materialising the Body of the Saint: Pilgrimage Politics and Art

12.15-1.30pm Lunch (for speakers and chairs only)

Session 2: Chair – Rose Marie San Juan (UCL)

1.30pm
Paper 3: Diane Apostolos-Cappadona (Georgetown)
“An ‘athlete of God’ or simply naked?: The Magdalene in the Wilderness from Isenbrandt to Etty”

2.15pm
Paper 4: Francesco Ventrella (Sussex)
Morelli’s Magdalen and the Sexual Politics of Reading

Tea/Coffee – all delegates

Session 3: Chair – Rose Marie San Juan (UCL)

3.30pm
Paper 5: Lucy Bolton (QMUL)
Beautiful repentant whore: Mary Magdalen, Movie Star

4.15pm
Paper 6: Henrietta Simpson (Slade School of Art, UCL)
The Implications of Absence: Mary Magdalen and the Wilderness Landscape

5pm Roundtable chaired by Michelle O’Malley (WI)

6.15-7.30pm
Magdalena. A Portrait in Song of One of Christianity’s Most Beloved Sinners
Joglaresa. Director: Belinda Sykes
Supported by the Coffin Trust, University of London
The Warburg Institute Lecture Room. Refreshments provided

CFP: Walking with saints, Ronse, Belgium, 24-16 May 18

fiertelCall for Papers: Walking with saints, Ronse, Belgium, May 24 – 26, 2018
Deadline: Dec 10, 2017

Walking with saints: protection, devotion and civic identity. The role of the landscape.

Since the adoption of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2003, the issue of cultural practices has increasingly gained the attention of heritage professionals, academics, decision makers and practitioners alike. Many practices, rituals, performances, social traditions, craftsmanship and more have since been put on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage. However, despite the growing interest in the social dimensions of cultural heritage and the recognition of the importance of the intangible aspects of heritage, many issues still need further reflection.  A crucial aspect is the interaction and relationship between intangible cultural heritage and its spatial contexts. This is part of a broader “spatial turn” in historiography and research.
For centuries people in Europa and elsewhere have walked the landscape carrying the relics of martyrs and saints. By doing so they gave meaning to and altered the significance of the land, be it urban or natural, in more ways than we imagine. One of these aspects is the way in which the landscape is transformed by walking it, thus setting paths, reinforcing boundaries, strengthening a community’s identity in relation to a certain landscape or setting the pace of life according to the repetition of the traditional acts in time.
“Walking with saints: protection, devotion and civic identity” focusses on the origin and evolution of procession rites with a strong link with the landscape. This conference, therefore, aims at studying the religious landscape, be it a specific spot or a larger territory, not as the mere spatial background for spiritual activities, but as an active agent in the shaping, transmission and transformation of the spiritual activity of human beings throughout time. Hence, we invite also reflections on developments in the 19th and 20th centuries when a rediscovering of the past, both within and outside the Christian churches, was en vogue and when new ways of looking at the natural landscape were moulded in the aftermath of the industrialisation of the economy.

Though the starting point is an activity that is typical for Europe, we are interested in broadening the perspective to non-Christian and non-Western traditions that have an important connection with the landscape in which they are performed.  It is generally known, for example, that the landscape and natural phenomena play an important role in the traditions of indigenous cultures in Australia, the Americas and Africa. In Asia walking with the statues of gods is a common, though little understood, phenomenon. It is to be expected that these traditions can broaden our understanding of the role of the landscape in the development and sustainability of immaterial heritage.

Papers are invited that deal with the following themes of the conference:
•    Sacralisation of the landscape: alteration, destruction and resistance
•    Immaterial heritage: religion and landscape
•    Perennial aspect of immaterial heritage
•    Immaterial heritage and community building: identity, assimilation, integration
•    Healing saints in their territorial context
•    The influence of processions on the landscape and on the drawing of parochial and city boundaries
•    Processions, pilgrimages and the senses
•    Healing saints, magic and assimilation

The starting point for the conference and the reason why it is held in Ronse is the Fiertel Ommegang. This procession originates from around 1090 A.D. and is yearly held on Trinity Sunday. During a walk of 32, 6 km the inhabitants of Ronse circumscribe the territorial boundaries of the city carrying Saint Hermes’s relics for protection and cure. For ages, the Fiertel has been one of the most important religious activities in the region and it has to date remained a strong symbol of the inhabitant’s civic identity even in times of secularization.
This 3 day conference will be hosted by the city of Ronse and is part of an assessment of the local Fiertel procession as a possible candidate for recognition as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Please submit papers for individual sessions no later than December 10 2017.
Proposals should include
– A paper title of max. 10 words
– A paper abstract of max. 350 words
– A short C.V. of max. 1000 words including current current affiliation and full contact details
All documents should be merged into 1 single PDF file.
Proposals should be sent to papers@wws2018.com

Call for complete session proposals

While the sessions proposed by the conference organisers focus on the western European and Christian traditions we welcome complete session proposals on related themes covering non-Western and non-Christian traditions.
The aim of the conference is not only to study the Fiertel in its local context, but also to trace traditions and rituals which are cross-confessional and transcultural. We hope that this reflection and dialogue will help us to understand the origins of the Fiertel, as a ritual and spiritual quest outdating Christianity.

Full session proposal are to be submitted by December 10 2017.

Proposal should include:
– A session title of max. 10 words
– A session proposal of max. 350 words
– 3 individual paper proposals consisting out of a title of max. 10 words and an abstract of max. 350 words each.
– A CV of max. 1000 words for each: the session organizer and the session participants. The CV should include information on the current affiliation and full contact details.

All documents have to be merged into 1 PDF file.

Proposals should be sent to papers@wws2018.com

Post-Doc: Post-doctoral researcher for the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide study of its origins, spread and development (Latin evidence), University of Warsaw

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Post-Doc: Post-doctoral researcher for the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide
study of its origins, spread and development (Latin evidence), University of Warsaw
Deadline: 31 September 2017
The Institute of History, University of Warsaw, is seeking to recruit a post-doctoral
researcher for a position in the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide study of
its origins, spread and development. The Project is supported by an Advanced Grant
from the European Research Council under Grant Agreement Number 340540 and is
based at the University of Oxford with a partnership at the University of Warsaw. The successful candidate will work as part of a team of seven post-doctoral researchers reporting to the Principal Investigator, Prof. Bryan Ward-Perkins (University of Oxford), but under direct supervision of Dr. hab. Robert Wiśniewski (University of Warsaw). The postholder will have responsibility for collecting Latin evidence consisting mostly of literary texts, within an electronic searchable database. The postholder is also expected to produce sole-authored articles on aspects of the cult of saints in the West.
This is a full-time time position for 12 months, starting on 1 November 2017 or soon
thereafter. The postholder will be offered the salary of about 2 700 Euros per month.
For more information about the Project see: http://cultofsaints.history.ox.ac.uk
If you have any questions about the project or the recruitment procedure, please
address them to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl)