Tag Archives: London

Lecture: ‘The Seal Makes the Man – or Woman: London in the Thirteenth Century ’ 23rd May 2016

SealLondon Record Society

‘The Seal Makes the Man – or Woman: London in the Thirteenth Century ’

a talk by Dr John McEwan, Centre for Digital Humanities, Saint Louis University, Missouri

Monday 23 May 2016 at 6.30pm at

The Priory Church of St Bartholomew the Great

West Smithfield London EC1A 9DS

Free lecture   All welcome

IHR Medieval and Tudor London Seminars, Summer Term 2016

Map-London-Visscher-1616-s

Medieval and Tudor London
Sponsored in memory of Dr Elspeth Veale
Convenors: Professor Caroline M.Barron (RHUL), Professor Vanessa Harding (Birkbeck), Dr Julia Merritt (University of Nottingham).

For enquiries relating to this seminar, or you would like to be added to the mailing list, please contact Vanessa Harding: V.Harding@bbk.ac.uk

The Medieval and Tudor London Seminar runs in the summer term only (April-June). We welcome enquiries and offers of papers at any time

Time: Thursday, 5.15pm (except 23 April: 17:30)

Venue: Wolfson Room NB01, Basement, IHR, North block, Senate House unless otherwise stated

  • 28 April: Working together apart. Maynard Buckwith, William Whittell and the network of London-based wardrobe suppliers to Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester
    (Tracey Wedge)
  • 5 May: Medieval London almshouses (Sarah Lennard-Brown, Birkbeck) Meeting the Monks: visitors to the London Charterhouse 1405 (David Harrap, QMUL)
  • 12 May: Henry Yevele and the Building of London Bridge Chapel (Christopher Wilson, UCL)
  • 19 May: Gogmagog and Corineus: from the West Country to the New Troy, Trojans and Giants on the sea-coast of Totnes (John Clark, Museum of London)
    Gogmagog come(s) to London (Alixe Bovey, Courtauld Institute of Art)
  • 26 May: The pre-Fire church of St Botolph Billingsgate (Stephen Freeth, venue for this lecture is Bedford Room G37, South Block, Senate House)
  • 2 June: Westminster’s wanton wives: whore and their communal ties in early modern England (Olivia Benowitz, Berkeley)
    The lesser-known resident aliens of fifteenth century London and its hinterland (Jessica Lutkin, York)
  • 9 June: Building Henry VII’s Savoy Hospital, 1505-1520 (Charlotte A Stanford, Brigham Young University)
  • 16 June: Murder in St. Paul’s Churchyard, Crime, Sanctuary, and Politics in 1539 (Shannon McSheffrey, Concordia University)
  • 23 June: Gadding and Girding in the early modern Blackfriars (Christopher Highley, Ohio State University)
  • 30 June: Medieval London viewed from the waterfront (Maryanne Kowaleski, Fordham University)

http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminars/133

Myths of Medieval Spain. Symposium, Courtauld Institute, 11 March

Detail of the Portico de la Gloria, Santiago de Compostela, late twelfth century

LAST MINUTE SPACES NOW AVAILABLE!

Myths of Medieval Spain. Symposium, Research Forum, Courtauld Institute of Art, 2-6.30, Weds 11 March 2015.

Four papers offer new ideas on a group of well-known sculptures and manuscripts from twelfth- and thirteenth-century Spain, exploring tensions between local and international concerns.

2: Introductory remarks, Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

2.10: Rose Walker (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Beatus manuscripts during the reign of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonor of England: a response to the fall of Jerusalem?

2.40: Rosa Rodríguez Porto (University of York)

Tvrpinus Domini gratia archiepiscopus: Notes on the Codex Calixtinus

3.10: James D’Emilio (University of South Florida)

The West Portals at Compostela and the Book of St. James: Artistic Eclecticism at a Cosmopolitan Shrine

3.40: discussion

4.15-5.15: tea

5.30-6.30:

Javier Martínez de Aguirre (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

The voices and the echoes: Saint James, Gregory the Great and Diego Gelmírez in Santiago de Compostela’s Puerta de Platerías

6.30: drinks reception

ARTES

Detail of the Portico de la Gloria, Santiago de Compostela, late twelfth centuryMyths of Medieval Spain. Symposium, Research Forum, Courtauld Institute of Art, 2-6.30, Weds 11 March 2015.

Attendance is free, but spaces are limited so you must register

Four papers offer new ideas on a group of well-known sculptures and manuscripts from twelfth- and thirteenth-century Spain, exploring tensions between local and international concerns.

2: Introductory remarks, Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

2.10: Rose Walker (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Beatus manuscripts during the reign of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonor of England: a response to the fall of Jerusalem?

2.40: Rosa Rodríguez Porto (University of York)

Tvrpinus Domini gratia archiepiscopus: Notes on the Codex Calixtinus

3.10: James D’Emilio (University of South Florida)

The West Portals at Compostela and the Book of St. James: Artistic Eclecticism at a Cosmopolitan Shrine

3.40: discussion

4.15-5.15: tea

5.30-6.30:

Javier Martínez de Aguirre (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

The voices and the echoes:…

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Postdoctoral Fellowship: Andrew W Mellon Foundation/Research Forum Postdoctoral Fellowship (Mellon MA) (London, The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Postdoctoral Fellowship:
Andrew W Mellon Foundation/Research Forum Postdoctoral Fellowship (Mellon MA)
London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2016
Deadline: 2 October 2014

courtauld-institute1

The Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is offering a fellowship to an early career researcher in the art of the Italian Renaissance. An interest in the relationship between art and literature is desirable.  This fellowship will give the Fellow the opportunity to pursue a research project while gaining teaching experience in a research environment and participating in the launch of an interdisciplinary M.A. course.  In addition to undertaking research and playing an active role in the Research Forum, the Fellow is expected to teach one B.A. course and to act as an affiliate to the Research Forum/Mellon Foundation M.A. course being offered for the first time in 2015-2016 (From Dante to Michelangelo: Rhetoric, Representation and Identity in Italian Art and Literature, c. 1300-1550) by Dr Scott Nethersole in collaboration with the Mellon Visiting Professor, Dr Frederica Pich (Lecturer in Italian, University of Leeds), a specialist in Italian literature, especially the relationship between poetry and portraiture.

Applicants must be at an early stage of their career, not currently holding or having held a permanent university post and having received a doctorate within the three years prior to the start date of the post (and no later than December 2014).

For more information and to apply, see here.

Forthcoming exhibition: Vikings: life and legend

Vikings_500Forthcoming Exhibition: Vikings: life and legend
London, 6 March – 22 June 2014

British Museum, the Sainsbury Exhibitions Gallery

In March 2014 the British Museum will open the Sainsbury Exhibitions Gallery with a major new exhibition on the Vikings, supported by BP. The exhibition, developed in cooperation with the National Museum of Denmark and the Berlin State Museum, is the first major exhibition in England on this subject for over 30 years, and presents a number of new archaeological discoveries and objects never before seen in the UK alongside important Viking Age artefacts from the British Museum’s own collection and elsewhere in Britain and Ireland. The star of the show will be the remains of a 37-metre-long Viking longship, the longest ever found, and the Vale of York hoard, whose size and quality make it one of the most important finds of its type.

Call for Papers: Fifty years after Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture (London 2014)

Call for Papers:
Fifty years after Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture: New Approaches, New Perspectives, New Material
London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 21 June 2014
Deadline: 16 February 2014

‘Tomb Sculpture will remain….among the basic works which determine turning points in the history of our discipline’. (Review in Art Bulletin, 1967)

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The Courtauld Institute will be holding a one-day conference in 2014 to mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Erwin Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture: Four Lectures on its Changing Aspects from Ancient Egypt to Bernini, comprising the lectures delivered originally in the fall of 1956 at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York. Panofsky’s lectures represented a new attempt to consider funerary monuments as artistic objects, charting developments in their iconography, style, form and function within the broader chronology of art history.  Panofsky also emphasised the importance of tombs as evidence for changing (and sometimes contradictory) attitudes towards the deceased.

The aim of this conference is to showcase the developments in research techniques and approaches that have led to new insights into tomb sculpture. The core period covered by the conference will be Medieval to Early Modern, but papers up to the current day will be considered. The core geographic focus will be Europe.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Panofsky’s approach to funerary sculpture and the legacy of his work
  • Iconography of tombs
  • Materials and their symbolic importance
  • Audience and reception
  • Monuments and the liturgy
  • Function of tombs- prospective/retrospective, devotional, legal, etc.
  • Inscriptions, epitaphs, heraldry
  • Technical investigation
  • Components of monuments with a low survival rate, e.g. covers, testers, railings
  • Brasses

Logistics:

  • Length of paper: 20 minutes
  • Expenses: funds are not available to cover participants’ expenses

This is an opportunity for doctoral and early career scholars to share their research. We plan to publish a collection of edited essays arising from the conference. Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and a brief biography to tombsculpture@gmail.com no later than Sunday 16 February 2014.

Organised by Professor Susie Nash, Ann Adams and Jessica Barker (The Courtauld Institute of Art).

Memberships & Societies: The Monumental Brass Society

mbs_gaynesfordThe Monumental Brass Society was founded in 1887 to preserve and record monumental brasses. Initially it was known as the Cambridge University Association of Brass Collectors. Later it was renamed the Monumental Brass Society. From a membership of 60 in 1887, the Society has grown to around 500 today.
Early research into brasses focused chiefly on English brasses of the medieval and early modern periods. Today, however, the field is much wider. Chronologically, it extends to brasses of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and geographically to those of Continental Europe. Incised slabs are also the subject of growing interest. Areas of current research include the artistic context of brasses, workshop organisation, and the self-image of the commemorated. 

The society’s main aims are as follows:
 

  • To encourage the appreciation of brasses, indents of lost brasses and incised slabs by publications, lectures and meetings
  • To preserve brasses by assisting with grant funding conservation and providing advice on their care
  • To promote the study of brasses, indents of lost brasses and incised slabs, and to encourage and disseminate original research
  • To record lost and stolen brasses and those remaining in private hands

Membership will benefit those with an interest in local history, genealogy, armour, the study of costume, and heraldry. If students join now, they receive 2013 and 2014 membership. For further information, see the Monumental Brass Society’s website and this membership leaflet.

On Saturday, 22 February 2014, the Monumental Brass Society will hold a study day at Temple Church, London. Proceedings start at 2pm. Entry is free and MBS members may invite non-member visitors to attend. This General Meeting will include the following lectures:

  • Reverend Robin Griffith-Jones, Master of the Temple: The Temple Church of London in the Middle Ages
  • Philip Lankester, The Medieval Military Effigies and Cross Slabs: some new evidence 
  • David Harte, The Men of the Inner Temple and their Brasses

Tea will be available at the end of the meeting and admission is free. For further information on the society’s events, see here.

Image: Carshalton, Surrey, Margaret, wife of Nicholas Gaynesford, d. 1503