Tag Archives: place

CFP: Medieval and Early Modern Spaces and Places: Experiencing the Court,Trinity Laban Conservatoire, London, April 3 – 04, 2019

mem20poster_experiencing20the20courtDeadline: Nov 15, 2018

Medieval and Early Modern Spaces and Places: Experiencing the Court, 2019

The early modern court adopted and developed exemplary cultural practices where objects and spaces became central to propagating power as well as places for exchange with other powers. This combination of images, objects, and sounds confronted the senses, making a powerful and distinctive impression of the resident family and the region they represented: flickering candlelight on glass and gold vessels adorned credenze (sideboards); musical instruments announced royal entries or provided entertainment; brightly coloured tapestries covered the palace walls along with paintings of biblical or mythological stories; cabinets displayed antiquities or rarities; perfume burners permeated the air; while the smells and tastes of rare delicacies at the centre of dining tables made for a multi-sensory spectacle.

This year the Open University’s Spaces & Places conference will address the theme of ‘Experiencing the Court’ by exploring the senses and the lived experiences of courtly life, whether based in a particular residence or defined by the travels of an itinerant ruler. This annual conference is fundamentally interdisciplinary: literary, musical, architectural, artistic and religious spaces will be the subjects of enquiry, not as discrete or separate entities, but ones which overlapped, came into contact with one another, and at times were in conflict.

The conference will examine life at court and will consider the following questions:

–    How can approaching the court in terms of the senses provide new methodologies for understanding each institution?
–    How were medieval and early modern courtly spaces adapted and transformed through the movement of material and immaterial things?
–    Which particular aspects of political, social and economic infrastructures enabled the exchange of objects and ideas?

Papers that address new methodologies, the digital humanities, object-centred enquiries, cross-cultural comparisons, or new theoretical perspectives are particularly welcome.

Please send a 150 word abstract along with a short biography to Leah Clark (leah.clark@open.ac.uk) and Helen Coffey (Helen.coffey@open.ac.uk) by 15 November 2018.

The conference will take place at the Open University’s partner institution Trinity Laban Conservatoire on 3 and 4 April 2019.  As Trinity Laban’s King Charles Court was once the site of Greenwich Palace, it is a fitting venue for a conference exploring court life.

For updated information visit our website: http://www.open.ac.uk/arts/research/medieval-and-early-modern-research/spaces-places

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CFP: Imago & Mirabilia (Barcelona, 18-20 Oct 2018)

Extended deadline!

The Ways of Wonder in the Medieval Mediterranean

18-20 October 2018 | Museu Nacional d’Art de Cataluyna

The ways of wonder in the middle Ages were shaped by a variety of places, stories and beliefs with ancient sources reworked by the Christian tradition. Activated by the opening of the Mediterranean, religious, commercial and military travels spread Christian worship, accounts and prized objects throughout Christianity. The real and the imaginary adventures confronted their protagonists with fabulous characters and places. The cult of Eastern saints found anchor points in the Western world where they sometimes developed as strongly or even more, proving, therefore, their polycentric nature.

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CFP: International Graduate Students Colloquium, “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries)”, Amiens (France) 29-30 May 2018

afficheCall For Papers: International Graduate Students Colloquium, “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries),” Amiens (France), 29-30 May 2018
Deadline: 15 January 2018

The research laboratory Trame (Texts, Representations, Archaeology and Memory from Antiquity to the Renaissance) of the University of Picardie Jules Verne associated with the research unit Transitions. Middle Ages and First Modernity (University of Liège) and with the Center for Advanced Studies in the Renaissance of the University François Rabelais (Tours) is organising three international meetings implemented by PhD students of these three institutions. the aim of the meetings is to enable exchanges and discussions between PhD students, junior researchers and experimented colleagues.

The first meeting will be held in Liège on Tuesday the 30th of January and Wednesday the 31st of January 2018 on the theme “Transition(s): concept, methods and case studies (14th-17th centuries)”.

The second meeting will be held in Amiens on Tuesday the 29 th of May and Wednesday the 30rd of May 2018 on the theme : “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries)”

This colloquium will be divided into two parts: first, the choice of the place of the building, and then the choice of the place of the object.
The construction of a new building usually start with an important thinking concerning the localization. The choice is strategic or symbolic, sometimes both, and depend on its function, its sponsor and its geographical context. For example, a monastery will set up on a secluded place or, in the contrary, on an urban center; a military fortress must occupy a strategic place to dominate a territory etc. In this way, it’s interesting to study all these factors, actors and issues regarding the establishment process in a rural, urban or suburban context. In the same way, objects (such as paintings, sculptures, precious objects, reliquaries, pieces of jewellery, funerary monuments, pieces of furniture, symbols of power etc.) are interesting to study. A lot of them need to be placed on a specific location, whether it’s in a real place or in the composition of a bidimensional work. The place where the object is arranged can be modified in consequence as there
are interactions between them. The goal of this meeting is to gauge the notion of place in all its forms in order to understand its meaning and its importance during the Middle Ages and First Modernity.

Day 1: The place of the Building
This first day will be focused on the buildings. The statements have to match the three
following approaches:
– The location choices of the edifice: how the place was chosen? Who were the actors of this choice? What were the effects of this implantation on a local and global historical context? Studies could focus on a specific place, a religious community, an edifice or an archaeological site. It’s a matter of showing the location strategies and the territorial transformations after the creation of a new “place of power” or a place of production in a historical and geographical context.
– The place‘s portrayal is the second theme: why did they choose this place? How is it
represented and why? Are they accurate the original place? How fictive places are show? The statements have to consider the different means used to point out peculiar location and the underlying goals.
– The place’s references in the sources: how literature and manuscripts mention those places whether real or fictive? What is the purpose in those texts? In an illuminated book, how is introduced the description of the place and what are the connections between the picture and the text? The statements could cover the evolution of the terms used to qualify a place. For example, the Latin word “prioratus” is barely used to qualify a priory between the 11th and the 13th centuries in manuscripts but we find lot of others words like house, farm, church etc.

Day 2: The place of the object
Concerning the place of the object we propose the three following themes:
– The position of the object:  usually, special objects are put in specific places: a building, a public space or a private one, or even a tomb. It would be interesting to attempt to understand why those objects have been placed in well-chosen areas, which were the factors and the issues according to which this decision has been made and by who. The history of the different places in which an object dating back to the 11th to the 17th century has been settled from his creation up to the present time can be made through a historiographical perspective. Reflections focusing on the methods used by historians, historians of arts or archaeologists to identify the original place of an object are
welcomed.
– Interaction between the object and the place: the goal is to think about the conjoint and
disjointed evolution of the building and the object: which are the impacts of the mutations and the intern reconstructions of the building on the object? How a building can specifically be built to accommodate one or several objects? This theme concerns both religious and public spaces, but also private places and the first experiences in museum architecture linked to a collection. Once again, all reflections about the methodology used to understand those interactions are welcomed.
– Representation of the object in paintings, illuminated manuscripts and sculptures: this
third theme invite to wonder about the methods used to represent the object on pieces of art. How is it put on the spot when it plays a central role in the pieces of art? How an object can be used to build up the composition of a picture?

Contribution Modalities
Lectures should relate to history, archaeology, history of arts and literature, from the 11th to the 17th century. The purpose is to have a brand new and interdisciplinary view on the notion of “place” which finally concern several research subjects. Communications should try to introduce historiographical elements enabling to develop comparisons between the different interventions and to think about the notion of “place” nd its evolution through time.

The proposals are expected for the 15th of January 2018 at the latest. They should be fifteen-line summary of the proposed lecture addressed to the Organising Committee, send together with a CV, the title of the thesis et the name of the research director(s). Candidate will be informed of the approval or the rejection of their proposal by the 15 th of February 2018.
Lectures should last 20 minutes maximum, with the possibility to project a Powerpoint. They can be made in French or in English.
We will unfortunately not be able to provide you financial help for the accommodation or the transport.
If you need an attestation to valorise your participation, we will be able to provide it.
Please do not hesitate to contact us if you need further information.
Organising Committee:
– Julie Colaye, PhD student in medieval history : juliecolaye@gmail.com
– Marie Quillent, PhD student in history of medieval art : marie.quillent@wanadoo.fr

CFP: Walking with saints, Ronse, Belgium, 24-16 May 18

fiertelCall for Papers: Walking with saints, Ronse, Belgium, May 24 – 26, 2018
Deadline: Dec 10, 2017

Walking with saints: protection, devotion and civic identity. The role of the landscape.

Since the adoption of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2003, the issue of cultural practices has increasingly gained the attention of heritage professionals, academics, decision makers and practitioners alike. Many practices, rituals, performances, social traditions, craftsmanship and more have since been put on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage. However, despite the growing interest in the social dimensions of cultural heritage and the recognition of the importance of the intangible aspects of heritage, many issues still need further reflection.  A crucial aspect is the interaction and relationship between intangible cultural heritage and its spatial contexts. This is part of a broader “spatial turn” in historiography and research.
For centuries people in Europa and elsewhere have walked the landscape carrying the relics of martyrs and saints. By doing so they gave meaning to and altered the significance of the land, be it urban or natural, in more ways than we imagine. One of these aspects is the way in which the landscape is transformed by walking it, thus setting paths, reinforcing boundaries, strengthening a community’s identity in relation to a certain landscape or setting the pace of life according to the repetition of the traditional acts in time.
“Walking with saints: protection, devotion and civic identity” focusses on the origin and evolution of procession rites with a strong link with the landscape. This conference, therefore, aims at studying the religious landscape, be it a specific spot or a larger territory, not as the mere spatial background for spiritual activities, but as an active agent in the shaping, transmission and transformation of the spiritual activity of human beings throughout time. Hence, we invite also reflections on developments in the 19th and 20th centuries when a rediscovering of the past, both within and outside the Christian churches, was en vogue and when new ways of looking at the natural landscape were moulded in the aftermath of the industrialisation of the economy.

Though the starting point is an activity that is typical for Europe, we are interested in broadening the perspective to non-Christian and non-Western traditions that have an important connection with the landscape in which they are performed.  It is generally known, for example, that the landscape and natural phenomena play an important role in the traditions of indigenous cultures in Australia, the Americas and Africa. In Asia walking with the statues of gods is a common, though little understood, phenomenon. It is to be expected that these traditions can broaden our understanding of the role of the landscape in the development and sustainability of immaterial heritage.

Papers are invited that deal with the following themes of the conference:
•    Sacralisation of the landscape: alteration, destruction and resistance
•    Immaterial heritage: religion and landscape
•    Perennial aspect of immaterial heritage
•    Immaterial heritage and community building: identity, assimilation, integration
•    Healing saints in their territorial context
•    The influence of processions on the landscape and on the drawing of parochial and city boundaries
•    Processions, pilgrimages and the senses
•    Healing saints, magic and assimilation

The starting point for the conference and the reason why it is held in Ronse is the Fiertel Ommegang. This procession originates from around 1090 A.D. and is yearly held on Trinity Sunday. During a walk of 32, 6 km the inhabitants of Ronse circumscribe the territorial boundaries of the city carrying Saint Hermes’s relics for protection and cure. For ages, the Fiertel has been one of the most important religious activities in the region and it has to date remained a strong symbol of the inhabitant’s civic identity even in times of secularization.
This 3 day conference will be hosted by the city of Ronse and is part of an assessment of the local Fiertel procession as a possible candidate for recognition as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Please submit papers for individual sessions no later than December 10 2017.
Proposals should include
– A paper title of max. 10 words
– A paper abstract of max. 350 words
– A short C.V. of max. 1000 words including current current affiliation and full contact details
All documents should be merged into 1 single PDF file.
Proposals should be sent to papers@wws2018.com

Call for complete session proposals

While the sessions proposed by the conference organisers focus on the western European and Christian traditions we welcome complete session proposals on related themes covering non-Western and non-Christian traditions.
The aim of the conference is not only to study the Fiertel in its local context, but also to trace traditions and rituals which are cross-confessional and transcultural. We hope that this reflection and dialogue will help us to understand the origins of the Fiertel, as a ritual and spiritual quest outdating Christianity.

Full session proposal are to be submitted by December 10 2017.

Proposal should include:
– A session title of max. 10 words
– A session proposal of max. 350 words
– 3 individual paper proposals consisting out of a title of max. 10 words and an abstract of max. 350 words each.
– A CV of max. 1000 words for each: the session organizer and the session participants. The CV should include information on the current affiliation and full contact details.

All documents have to be merged into 1 PDF file.

Proposals should be sent to papers@wws2018.com