Tag Archives: Late Middle Ages

CFP: The Byzantine tradition of Church embroidery in the Mediterranean and the Slavic World (1200-1800), thematic issue of Cahiers Balkaniques (INALCO)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACall for Submissions: The Byzantine tradition of Church embroidery in the Mediterranean and the Slavic World (1200-1800)
Deadline: 28 February 2018

This thematic issue of Cahiers Balkaniques (INALCO), which appears in 2019, celebrates the Byzantine tradition of Church embroidery and its various afterlives. It aims at investigating its evolution within the sphere of Byzantium’s cultural influence and beyond, with a chronological scope which begins from the Late Middle Ages and stretches until the 19thcentury, when artisanal productions begin to decline.

We welcome proposals on the following subjects:

– The different aspects of Byzantine ecclesiastical embroidery and its artistic and technical evolutions.
– Embroidery techniques and iconographies transmitted from West and/or East.
– The relationship between Byzantine/post-Byzantine productions and the Christian Orient (ex. Armenia, Georgia).
– The management of Byzantine heritage in the Slavic World.
– Italian-Greek borderland productions (ex. the Ionian Islands).
– The circulation of Byzantine embroideries overseas (Italy, Eastern Europe and beyond).
– Christian embroidery in Egypt and the Levant.

Proposals by junior and senior researchers will be equally considered with priority being given to original research, whether based on technical analysis, iconographical interpretation or textual evidence. Subjects which favor interdisciplinarity are particularly welcome. The volume will be bilingual (French and English) and will appear in print in 2019.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to epapastavrou@yahoo.gr; mariellereber@bluewin.ch

Guest editors:
Elena Papastavrou
Marielle Martiniani-Reber

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CFP: Medieval Eurabia: Religious Crosspollinations in Architecture, Art and Material Culture during the High and Late Middle Ages (1000-1600) at Annual Conference of the Association for Art History, UK, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, UK, 5th-7th April, 2018

800px-french_ciborium_with_rim_engraved_with_arabic_script_and_islamic_inspired_diamond_shaped_pattern_limoges_france_1215_1230Call for Papers: Session on Medieval Eurabia: Religious Crosspollinations in Architecture, Art and Material Culture during the High and Late Middle Ages (1000-1600) at Annual Conference of the Association for Art History, UK, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, UK, 5th-7th April, 2018
Deadline:
1st November, 2017

Panel organised by Sami De Giosa, Oxford University and Nikolaos Vryzidis, British
School at Athens
Email: aahchristianmuslimpanel2018@gmail.com
The coexistence of Christianity and Islam in the Medieval Mediterranean led to a
transfer of knowledge in architecture and material culture which went well beyond
religious and geographical boundaries. The use of Islamic objects in Christian
contexts, the conversion of churches into mosques and the mobility of craftsmen are
manifestations of this process. Although studies beginning with Avinoam Shalem’s
Islam Christianized (1996), have dealt extensively with Islamic influence in the West
and European influence in the Islamic Mediterranean, sacred objects, and material
culture more generally, have been relatively neglected. From crosses found in
Mosques, to European-Christian coins with pseudo/-shahada inscriptions, medieval
material culture is rife with visual evidence of the two faiths co-existing in both
individual objects and monuments.
This panel invites papers from scholars working on intercultural exchange in art,
architecture and material culture. We particularly welcome contributions that focus
on sacred objects that have been diverted or ‘converted’ to a new purpose, whether
inside or outside an explicitly religious context.
Papers should present original research, which expands the boundaries of
knowledge and which the scholars would like to be considered for publication.
Abstract should be no more than 250 words long.
 

 

CFP: Topics in the History of Nobility, Knighthood, and Heraldica: A Session in Honor of D’Arcy Jonathan Dacre Boulton, University of Notre Dame, Medieval Institute Sponsored Session at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018

wernigeroder_wappenbuch_022vCall for Papers: “Topics in the History of Nobility, Knighthood, and Heraldica: A Session in Honor of D’Arcy Jonathan Dacre Boulton” University of Notre Dame, Medieval Institute Sponsored Session at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018
Deadline: 15 September 2017

As many may be aware, Professor Jonathan Boulton recently retired from teaching at the University of Notre Dame.  In celebration of his achievements, and to honor his rich service to the community of students and scholars at the University of Notre Dame, the graduate students in the Medieval Institute are sponsoring a session of papers for next year’s ICMS in grateful recognition of Professor Boulton’s deep contributions to the study of heraldry and medieval knighthood as well as of his legacy and passion as a teacher in these fields.

The theme most appropriate to this occasion is “Topics in the History of Nobility, Knighthood, and Heraldica,” which encompasses both the early and later middle ages and allows for inquiry in a diversity of potential subjects, including the development of martial/courtly ethos, the visual and literary rhetoric of heraldry across multiple media, legal practices governing armigery and display of arms, the political and sociological dimensions of knightly orders, and the atavistic or nostalgic appropriation of heraldric symbols and discources in later centuries.

This broad and inclusive theme is especially fitting, given Professor Boulton’s lifetime dedication as a teacher and a scholar to illuminating the critical role played by evolving concepts of knighthood and nobility in a range of historical developments throughout the middle ages.

We welcome submissions from scholars in all disciplines and fields of inquiry.  Please send abstracts for the seession to Christopher Scheirer (cscheire@nd.edu)

Conference: Heraldic Badges: From Miniature to Monumental, 1300–1500, Courtauld Institute of Art, Thursay 29 September, 2016

wilton-d-1-2-600x600Conference: Heraldic Badges: From Miniature to Monumental, 1300–1500, Courtauld Institute of Art, Thursay 29 September, 2016

The question of how to represent a person was of great importance to artists and patrons in the later Middle Ages. While much attention has focused on the development of facial likeness in portraiture, the concurrent fashion for expressing identity through symbolic codes has been comparatively ignored. Heraldic badges – a form of symbolic representation whereby individuals are represented through objects, plants, animals, letters or mythological beings – were extremely popular in the royal and aristocratic courts of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, proliferating across a wide range of artistic media and contexts.

This one-day conference brings together experts from across Europe, and aims to stimulate cross-cultural conversations on the display, function and circulation of heraldic badges in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The theme ‘Miniature to Monumental’ focuses on the size and context of badges, interrogating why these devices were represented in radically different scales, and the shifts in meaning incurred in these transformations.

Programme

10:00 – 10:15 REGISTRATION (Research Forum Seminar Room)

10:15 – 10:40 Jessica Barker (University of East Anglia) and Jana Gajdošová (University of Cambridge), What is a Badge and What are its Meanings?

Session 1: What is a Badge?

10:40 – 11:05 Laurent Hablot (Université de Poitiers), English and French Secular Badges 1350-1450, Interaction and Comparison

11:05 – 11:30 John Goodall (independent), Beasts and Badges in the Lancastrian Court.

11:30 –11:55 Jessica Berenbeim (University of Oxford), Chivalry in the Cloister.

11:55 – 12:10 Discussion

12:10 – 13:20 LUNCH

Session 2: Miniature

13:20 – 13:30 Lloyd de Beer (University of East Anglia/British Museum), The Digital Badge and the Potential of Miniature Things.

13:30 – 13:55 Maria Theisen (Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften), The Badge of the Royal Order of Wenceslas IV and its use in the King’s Willehalm manuscript (Vienna, ÖNB, Cod. Ser. n. 2643).

13:55 – 14:20 Hanneke van Asperen (Radboud University Nijmegen), Secular or Sacred? The Secular Design of Some Religious Badges in the Low Countries.

14:20 – 14:45 Milada Studničková (Institute of Art History, Czech Academy of Sciences), ‘Signum draconis’: Visual sources, Written Documents and Legends behind Sigismund of Luxembourg’s Badge of the Monarchical Order.

14:45 – 15:00 Discussion

15:00 – 15:30 TEA/COFFEE BREAK

Session 3: Monumental

15:30 – 15:55 Michael Carter (English Heritage), Azure, three horseshoes or: The Arms of Fountains Abbey, An Enduring Puzzle.

15:55 – 16:20  Matthew Payne (Westminster Abbey), Richard II’s White Hart Badge at Westminster Abbey.

16:20 – 16:45 Joana Ramôa Melo & Begoña Farré Torras (Universidade Nova, Lisbon), Heraldic Polychromy at the Monastery of Batalha: Presentation of a Work in Progress.

16:45 – 17:10 Miguel Metelo de Seixas (Universidade Nova, Lisbon) and João António Portugal (Instituto Português de Heráldica) Under the Sign of Our Lady and St. George: Dynastic Memory and the Use of Badges in the Portuguese Royal Shrine of Batalha.

17:10 – 17:25 Discussion

17:25 – 17:30 Closing Remarks by Alixe Bovey (Courtauld Institute of Art).

17:30 – 18:30 RECEPTION

Ticket / entry details: £16 (General admission) £11 (Students, Courtauld staff, concessions). Click here to book.

CFP: Topographies of devotion. Visual cultures of pilgrimage in the 14th and 15th century @International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017

20140125-010711CFP: Topographies of devotion. Visual cultures of pilgrimage in the 14th and 15th century @International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017
Organiser: Isabella Augart, University of Hamburg, Department of Art History
Deadline: 10th September 2016.

The medieval pilgrimage routes were spaces of cultural and material exchange upon which diverse travellers set off on a common path. The research focus on the link between geography and religion over the last few years has considerably broadened our understanding of medieval art and architecture. The proposed session seeks to provide perspectives on images, church spaces, sacred topographies and material culture of pilgrimage with a regional concentration on the Holy Roman Empire, focusing in particular on the following areas of interest:

  • accounts of pilgrimage journeys in illuminated manuscripts and prints
  • the relation of pilgrimage churches and routes to the surrounding landscape
  • social dimensions of accessibility and mediation in topographies of pilgrimage
  • visual and tactile practices of veneration related to churches and artworks

How to submit: Please send your abstract (max.150-words) for a twenty-minute paper and a short biography to the session organiser (isabella.augart@uni-hamburg.de) before 10th September 2016.

Forthcoming exhibition: the Council of Constance

Umzug_des_Kaisers_Konzil_kleinForthcoming Exhibition: the Council of Constance
Konstanz, 27 April 2014 – 21 September 2014

2014 marks the 600th anniversary of the start of the Council of Constance. The Council was a major event in church politics which made Constance the center of European politics and a meeting place of European cultures in the years 1414-1418. Baden-Württemberg commemorates the anniversary of the world event of the late Middle Ages with a Great State Exhibition. The organizational responsibility was assigned to the Badische Landesmuseum in Karlsruhe.

The Exhibition can be viewed from 27 April to 21 September 2014 in the actual building in which events took place in Constance. The Conclave moved into the Merchants Guildhall in 1417 with the intention of not leaving until the church could be united by the successful election of a single Pope. We are in the thick of the historical events in the building now called the Council House, which is a landmark of the city.

President Joachim Gauck has consented to act as patron of the Great State Exhibition