Tag Archives: BAA

CFP: BAA, International Romanesque Conference (14-16 April 2020) Deadline: 15 May, 2019

The British Archaeological Association will hold the sixth in its series of biennial International Romanesque conferences in association with the Dommuseum in Hildesheim on 14-16 April, 2020. The theme is Romanesque and the Year 1000, and the aim is to examine transformation in art and architecture in the years to either side of the millennium.

Despite the complex political situation in late-10th-century Europe, a period marked by chaos in some areas and effective authority in others, the last quarter of the century saw an apparent upsurge in artistic production in the Empire, southern Britain, Lombardy and the Mediterranean. The decades after the millennium have left a larger residue of work, notably in France, but were the 1020s artistically more dynamic than the 980s? How might we describe the cultural climate of the Latin West between c.970 and c.1030? Proposals for papers concerned with the above are welcome, as are those that review individual patrons, particularly in establishing workshops and developing expertise. The period sees remarkable developments in iconography and stylistic expression. It sees portable monumental and devotional statues come into being, along with the application of novel, or at least re-understood, architectural forms. Does the interest in architectural ‘articulation’ initiate a new understanding of the expressive potential of architecture? How good is the evidence for monumental wall painting, what is the state of knowledge on scriptoria as centres of artistic production c.1000, what conditions gave rise to the proliferation of ‘First Romanesque’ architecture, how important was Rome, what was the impact of objects from the Carolingian past or Byzantine present, and what are we to make of the apparent disparities between artistically ‘active’ areas and artistically ‘inactive’ areas? The period also sees a boom in the production of three-dimensional objects, with the revival of bronze-casting, the re-emergence of architectural relief sculpture and he production of monumental sculpture. The conference is geographically international, though the date brackets of c.970-c.1030 will be strictly applied.

The Conference will take place at the Dommuseum in Hildesheim from 14-16 April. There will also be an opportunity to stay on for two days of visits to buildings in the surrounding area on the 17 and 18 April.

Proposals for papers of up to 30 minutes in length should be sent to the convenors, John McNeill and Gerhard Lutz, on romanesque2020@thebaa.org by 15 May, 2019.

Papers should be in English.

Decisions on acceptance will be made by 31 May.

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Scholarship: British Archeological Association Shrewsbury Conference 2019

Student Scholarships available for the British Archeological Association’s Shrewsbury Conference, 15-19 July, 2019

BAAThe 2019 BAA Conference will explore the art, architecture and archaeology of medieval Shrewsbury and north Shropshire. Lectures will include papers on subjects as varied as late Roman Shropshire, Shrewsbury’s medieval topography, the patronage, art, architecture and archaeology of medieval churches in and around Shrewsbury, stone sculpture, alabasters, roof bosses, seals, and nineteenth-century antiquarianism.

Site visits will include St Mary’s, St Alkmund, Bear Steps, the Town Walls and Shrewsbury Abbey, while there will be two coach excursions (one full & one half-day) outside Shrewsbury. These will encompass Acton Burnell (church and castle), Wenlock Priory, Buildwas Abbey, Haughmond Abbey, Atcham, Shifnal, and Tong.

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BAA Lectures: 2016-2017 Programme

logomaneyBAA Lectures, 2016-2017 Programme : Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE, 4.30 p.m. (tea)/5.00 p.m (lecture)

5 OCTOBER 2016* – ‘Miraculous Ground Plans and the Liturgy of Building Sites in Late Medieval Italy’ by Dr Lucy Donkin, University of Bristol (The lecture will be preceded by the Association’s Annual General Meeting.)

2 NOVEMBER 2016 – ‘Architecture and Landscape at Restormel Castle, Cornwall’ by Dr Jeremy Ashbee, English Heritage

7 DECEMBER 2016* – ‘Monuments in Wax: Form and Function in Medieval Charters’ by Dr Jessica Barenbeim, Magdalen College, Oxford

4 JANUARY 2017 – ‘The Great English Medieval Bridges: Designs and Functions.’ by Dr David Harrison, International Bridges Group (The lecture will be followed by the Association’s Twelfth-Night Party)

1 FEBRUARY 2017* – ‘When is a Cathedral not a Cathedral? Typologies of Secular and Monastic in the English Great Church.’ by Jon Cannon, University of Bristol

1 MARCH 2017, ‘The Medieval Glazing of Westminster Abbey: New Discoveries’ by Professor Richard Marks and Laura Atkinson, University of Cambridge and Canterbury Cathedral Stained Glass Studio

5 APRIL 2017 – “See God Face to Face; Pray for the King’: The Late Medieval Painted Glass of Winchester Cathedral c1495-c1515’ by Anya Heilpern, University of York

3 MAY 2017* – ‘The Late Medieval Master Mason as Manager; a New Assessment based on a Systematic Analysis of the English Cathedral Fabric Rolls’ by Christopher Paterson, University of Oxford (The lecture will be followed by the President’s Reception)

NB: Council meetings will precede the meetings on dates marked with an asterisk (*).
Non-members are welcome to attend occasional lectures, please sign the visitors’ book on arrival.

CFP: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017

logomaneyCall for Papers: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017
Deadline: Friday 23 rd September

After a successful outing to the Leeds IMC this summer where the BAA hosted two sessions, the BAA welcomes proposals for further BAA organised sessions next year (July 3 rd -6 th 2017). The IMC’s research theme for 2017 is “Otherness” which I think could be interpreted very successfully by the BAA’s members and relate well to research incorporating material culture.
“Other” could refer to those who are deemed to be other in society (strangers, foreigners, monsters); objects that are unusual, or out of the norm, and could therefore be considered as ‘other’; case studies that do not conform to type; and even topics concerning what is culturally “other” (such as artistic, architectural, and literature styles).
Approaches to this topic could include how “other” is encountered and responded to, or how ‘other’ can be defined and identified.

Suggested topics from the IMC include:
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
Full details of the IMC and their interpretation of ‘other’ and other topic suggestions can be found here:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/125137/international_medieval_congress

It is hoped that the BAA can organise several sessions once again, with similar papers grouped together (either methodologically or by subject). Therefore if you do have any ideas about colleagues whose research would complement your own paper, please do include such comments along with your paper’s proposal.

How to Submit: Proposals should consist of a title, and short abstract (50-150 words). Please send paper proposals to hpmahood@gmail.com by Friday 23 rd September. If you have any questions, please do get in touch.

BAA Aberdeen Conference Scholarships

 

The British Archaeological Association’s annual conference for 2014 will be held at Old Aberdeen. The conference will be based in the medieval surroundings of Aberdeen University with extended trips throughout Aberdeenshire and Moray. Aberdeen University was founded in 1495 by Bishop Elphinstone and 2014 is the 500th anniversary of his death. Papers and tours will cover aspects of his architectural patronage. Highlights will include visits to Elgin Cathedral (the ‘Lantern of the North’) and Pluscarden Abbey, the only medieval monastery in Britain still inhabited by monks and being used for its original purpose. Secular architecture will feature 13th-century Kildrummy Castle, the innovative tower house at Huntly, and lavish Fyvie Castle. Aberdeen offers the well-preserved St Machar’s Cathedral with its castellated towers and heraldic ceiling, and King’s College Chapel, the only complete medieval church interior surviving in Scotland. Historical overviews will be provided, particularly tackling the moderate Aberdeenshire response to the Reformation which allowed the middle ages to linger into the seventeenth century.

 

 A LIMITED NUMBER OF SCHOLARSHIPS ARE AVAILABLE TO POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS COVERING THE FULL COST OF THE CONFERENCE AND ACCOMMODATION.
Download the application form here.