Tag Archives: Courtauld Institute of Art

CFP: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 30 October 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 30 October 2017.

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CFP: Association for Art History Annual Conference 2018 (London, 5-7 Apr 2018)

London, The Courtauld Institute of Art and King’s College London
Deadline: May 1, 2017
The Courtauld Institute of Art
Association for Art History Annual Conference 2018, Call for Sessions

‘LOOK OUT!’ is the theme of the Association for Art History’s Annual Conference , co-hosted by the Courtauld Institute of Art and King’s College London, from April 5 – April 7 2018.

•    Incorporating a whole range of outlooks – of educators, curators and heritage partners, of university and other teachers and researchers in art history and other disciplines, and of artists themselves.
•    Challenging you to think about art history’s global reach and connections with other affiliated subjects in the arts, humanities and sciences.
•    Inviting new perspectives on international collaborations within the field in the context of current political events.
•    Encompassing examination of the histories and futures of art historical practices, and the opportunities and challenges of broader political and public engagement.
•    Other creative and innovative ways of interpreting the theme are enthusiastically encouraged!

We aim to include contributions from those engaged in all aspects of research involving art history and visual culture.

DEADLINE for academic and alternative session proposals: May 1st 2017
to aahsessions2018@gmail.com

Conference: The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, ca. 1400- 1600 (The Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Student Symposium), The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28 April 2017

ghirlandaio20-20calling20of20the20apostles20detail-201481-20fresco-20sistine20chapel20vatican-31-600x600Conference: The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, ca. 1400 – 1600, (The Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Student Symposium) Courtauld Institute of Art, London, April 28, 2017

In recent years, the analysis of social networks has generated a
fruitful field of scholarly enquiry. Research addressing the dynamics
that govern personal relationships within and without communities of
various kinds has permeated through historical, anthropological, and
sociological studies. These investigations have traced the ways in
which societies structured according to gender, family bonds, and
neighbourhood ties as well as political, professional, and religious
associations regulated social interaction. However, the role of art and
architecture in cultivating these interpersonal relationships has not
been explored comprehensively. Even art historical approaches have
frequently given preference to textual rather than visual evidence in
elucidating these social networks.

This conference seeks to shed light on the ways in which social
networks have been represented visually. Such an approach has great
potential to deepen the discussion surrounding the commission,
production, and reception of art and architecture between 1400 and 1600.

This conference is generously sponsored by the Sackler Research Forum,
Courtauld Institute of Art, the CHASE AHRC Doctoral Training
Partnership Cohort Development Fund, and the Society for Renaissance
Studies.

‘The Art of the Network’ is free and open to the public. Advanced
registration is strongly encouraged:
http://courtauld.ac.uk/event/the-art-of-the-network

PROGRAMME

9.00 – 9.30
Registration

9.30 – 9.45
Welcome: Alexander J. Noelle (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

9.45 – 11.10
Session 1: Materialising Allegiance
Chaired by Suzanne Duff (Brown University)

Ann Adams (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
Perpetual Membership: The Fifteenth-Century Tombs of the Knights of the
Order of the Golden Fleece

Sara Frier (Yale University)
So sah ich als Soldat aus (‘This is how I looked as a soldier’): The
Mercenary-Artists of Renaissance Switzerland

Anna Merlini (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
A Journey through the Labyrinth of Symbols: Retracing a Social Network
across Achille Bocchi’s Symbolicae Quaestiones (1555)

Discussion

11.10 – 11.35
Tea / Coffee Break

11.35 – 13.00
Session 2: Civic Art
Chaired by Imogen Tedbury (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Maria Harvey (The University of Cambridge)
‘ + E?????? ????? ? ???????? ?[??] … ?[????] K??[??????]’: Art and
Community in Fifteenth-Century Salento

Saida Bondini (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
A History of Families: Networks of Private Patronage in Late
Fifteenth-Century Bologna

Maria Matarazzo (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
The Plinian Monuments in Como: Classical Antiquity as Municipal Identity

Discussion

13.00 – 14.00
Lunch Break

14.00 – 15.25
Session 3: Artist(ic) Identity
Chaired by Lydia Goodson (The Warburg Institute)

Elizabeth Bernick (John Hopkins University)
Mapping Cesare da Sesto: A Placeless Style

Wouter Wagemakers (University of Amsterdam)
Visualising Patterns of Patronage in Sixteenth-Century Verona: Michele
Sanmicheli and the Roman Connection

Luca Baroni (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
Urbino to Europe: Federico Barocci’s Artistic and Diplomatic Network as
Visualised in His Paintings

Discussion

15.25 – 15.50
Tea / Coffee Break

15.50 – 17.15
Session 4: Visualising Dynasties
Chaired by Bart van Eekelen (Utrecht University)

Anastazja Grudnicka (University College London)
The (Un)Making of the Habsburg Dynasty: Visual Representations of
Matthias Habsburg in the Dutch Provinces (1577-1581)

Rebekah Helen Lee (University of York)
By the Book: Dynastic and Corporal Network Building in the Arenberg
Family Portrait Album circa 1600

Marina Porri (Universities of Florence, Siena, and Pisa)
Marriage Portraits as Political Networking: The Medici Court at the End
of the Sixteenth Century

Discussion

17.15 – 17.30
Comfort Break

17.30 – 17.45
Closing Remarks: Alexander Röstel (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

17:45 – 18:45
Keynote Address
Prof. John Padgett (University of Chicago)
Networks in Renaissance Florence

18.45 – 20:00
Reception

Early Career Lectureship in Medieval Art at The Courtauld, 3 years, from September 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to appoint an Early Career Lecturer in Medieval Art (fixed-term; 3 years from 1 September 2017) to support and deliver teaching in the Department of Art History.

Salary: £35,798 pa (Inc. London Allowance)

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The Courtauld Institute of Art is the UK’s leading institution for teaching and research in Art History and the conservation of paintings; it is also home to one of the finest small art museums in the world.

Closing date: Monday 13 March 2017

Further details: https://jobs.courtauld.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=121

Lecture, Prof Liz James: ‘Light and colour; dark and shadow’, 5.30pm,Tues 11th October, Courtauld Institute, London

church-of-the-theotokos-pammakaristos

Church of the Theotokos Pammakaristos (Liz James)

Prof Liz James (University of Sussex): ‘Light and colour; dark and shadow’

Light and colour, darkness and shadow, are all fundamental aspects of works of art in a practical way (can we see the work?), a formal fashion (what colours are used?) and conceptually (why these colours? Why this light or this lighting?). But they are also elements of the work of art that have tended to have a secondary place within the history of art. Through a discussion of Byzantine monumental mosaics, this lecture will consider some of the ways in which light, dark, colour and shade are fundamental elements in the appearance, effectiveness and function of images. 

Liz James is Professor of Art History at the University of Sussex and a Byzantinist. She has been interested in light and colour for a long time, writing her doctoral thesis on colour in Byzantium. She has just finished writing a book about medieval mosaics (provisionally entitled ‘A short history of medieval mosaics’).

Ticket / entry details:

Tuesday 11 October 2016
5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

This lecture launches the Frank Davis Memorial Series on Light/Darkness

Open to all, free admission

British Museum Handling Session: Master W and Key and late-gothic architectural prints 

an00059980_001_lThanks to the assistance of Lloyd De Beer and Naomi Speakman, both in progress with individual collaborative PhDs at the British Museum, the Courtauld has organised several handling sessions for postgraduate students over the past few years – you can read a report from an earlier session here.
The March session was kindly hosted by the British Museum’s Prints and Drawings department, and focused on Master W and Key (active c. 1465–1490), an anonymous Netherlandish engraver named after the shape of his monogram. Most of the eighty-two extant works by this artist are ornament prints, but he is also known for his engravings of ships, the first known representations of this kind.
Both aspects of the Master’s production were discussed during the handling session, when we had the opportunity to analyze several prints by the artist, including:
While the ships may be connected with the ducal fleet of Charles the Bold of Burgundy, scholars have generally interpreted the architectural prints as patterns to be used by craftsmen in the workshop. Nevertheless, discussion during the session raised many questions on the cost, circulation and market of such early prints. Although a modern perspective may see the printed image as a cheap, mass-produced medium, these early architectural  examples are very complex, and often required the painstaking engraving of more than one plate, printed on multiple sheets. Would such time-consuming creations really have offered a more convenient alternative to the exchange of drawings among workshops? What other reasons may have contributed to the spread of such designs?
Although this remained an open question, consideration of prints such as Alart du Hameel’s Design for a Gothic baldachin  revealed that early architectural prints could be intentionally used to advertise their maker’s expertise in design and geometry: this print features a prominent signature, a mason’s mark, and an abbreviated ground-plan which seems to imply superior technical expertise. The same consummate skill is show in Wenzel von Olmütz’s Elevation of a Gothic Pinnacle with a Hexagonal Ground Plan, although in contrast to du Hameel, Olmütz did not sign his creation, and positioned plan and elevation one above the other, as typical of other Gothic drawings and of the Gothic design process in general.
Other treats of the handling session included Emperor Heraclius entering Jerusalem with the upright True Cross, designed by Alart du Hameel but signed ‘Bosche,’ presumably in an attempt to partake of the painter’s fame; Master ES’ figured alphabet; Albrecht Dürer’s large coloured drawing of a Gothic table fountain.
Objects for the session were selected by Dr Ursula Weekes, Dr Tom Nickson and Costanza Beltrami. We also put together a short list of suggested reading on the theme of late-Gothic architectural prints and alphabets:
Kik, Oliver, ‘From Lodge to Studio: Transmissions of Architectural Knowledge in the Southern Low Countries, 1480–1530.’ In The Notion of the Painter-Architect in Italy and the Southern Low Countries, edited by Piet Lombaerde (Turnhout, 2014)
Waters, Michael, ‘A Renaissance without Order: Ornament, Single-sheet Engravings and the Mutability of Architectural Prints,’ Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 71, no. 4 (December 2002), pp. 488-523
Kavaler, Matt, ‘Gossart as Architect,’ and the entries on The Virgin and Child with Musical Angels (p. 126) and The Malvagna Diptych (p. 136) in Maryan W. Ainsworth (ed.), Man, Myth and Sensual Pleasures: Jean Gossart’s Renaissance: The Complete Works (New Haven and London, 2010)
Boekeler, Erika, ‘Building Meaning: The First Architectural Alphabet’. In Push Me, Pull You: Art and Devotional Interaction in Late Medieval & Early Modern Europe, eds S. Blick & L. Gelfand; E.J. (Brill, 2011), pp. 149-195.

Giotto’s Circle Presents Berlin Remixed: Papers on Italian Art and Architecture from the RSA Conference.

nuremberg_chronicle_berlin[1]After the recent Renaissance Society of America conference in Berlin, the Courtauld will be hosting an opportunity for those who could not see he papers – whether due to session clash or not attending the conference – in the, Research Forum Seminar Room, 30 April, 10.00 am – 6.00 pm.

10.00 – 11.30: SPACES AND PLACES I

Alexander Roestel (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Habemus paulum: Reconstructing the Florentine Church of San Paolino

Joanna Cannon (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Relocating the Virgin. Altars and panel paintings in the Dominican churches of Tuscany.

Donal Cooper (University of Cambridge): Provincialism and Plurality in the Franciscan Church Interior

11.30 – 11.45: Break

11.45 – 1.15: SPACES AND PLACES II/WORDS AND PICTURES I

Michaela Zoeschg (Victoria and Albert Museum/The Courtauld Institute of Art): Royal Courts and Enclosed Gardens: The Frescos in Santa Maria Donnaregina (Naples) and Their Audience

Janet Robson (Independent Scholar): Pride of Place: La Verna, Monticelli, and a Trecento Painting for a Noble Clarissan Nun

Federico Botana (Queen Mary, University of London): Learning the Trade: Illustrated Abbaco Manuscripts in Fifteenth-Century Florence.

1.15 – 2.30: Lunch (not provided)

2.30 – 4.00: WORDS AND PICTURES II

Scott Nethersole (The Courtauld Institute of Art): “Your arrows have pierced me”: Perugino’s Saint Sebastian and the Spectator

Federica Pich (University of Leeds): Written for the Viewer, Painted for the Reader: On the Rhetoric of Words in Portraits

Paul Hills (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Language and the Discrimination of Colors in the Time of Titian and Veronese

4.00 – 4.30 Break

4.30 – 6.00: BEYOND TUSCANY

Bryony Bartlett-Rawlings (The Courtauld Institute of Art): ‘Beware, you envious thieves of the work and invention of others, keep your thoughtless hands from these works of ours’.

Eva Papoulia (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Gregory XIII and Sixtus V: A Known Antipathy, an Unknown Project

A WIDER VIEW

Caroline Campbell (National Gallery) – discussant in a round tablePainting and Painters in Fifteenth-Century Venice’

Closing remarks

Reception to mark the publication of Péter Bokody’s book Images-within-Images in Italian Painting (1250-1350): Reality and Reflexivity, Ashgate 2015.