Tag Archives: authorship

Conference: New Dialogues in Art History, The Warburg Institute, London, September 26, 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f472296712f2640004419952f12foriginalThis one day conference brings together the next generation of art history scholars to present and discuss their ongoing research. Papers will predominately focus on Italian and Northern Renaissance Art (c. 1400–1600) and will encompass diverse media including tapestry, painting, engraving and stained glass. The conference will comprise five sessions. In the first four, two PhD students (or recent graduates) will present on topics that are united by common themes such as patronage, attribution and materiality. The final session, entitled ‘Opening New Dialogues’, will feature a paper by Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director and former PhD student at The Warburg). In order to foster the intellectual exchange central to ‘New Dialogues in Art History’ , the key paper(s) of each session will be followed by 20 minutes discussion.

Organised by Genevieve Verdigel & Lydia Goodson. Please direct any enquiries to the organisers at: NewArtDialogues@gmail.com

Programme

10:00–10:15: Registration

10:15–10:30: Introduction: Lydia Goodson and Genevieve Verdigel

10:30–11:30: Session 1: Making and Materiality
Chair: Alexander Röstel (Courtauld Institute / The National Gallery)
– Ang Li (University of Oxford): ‘The Revival of Gold Ground in Late Fifteenth-Century Italian Paintings.’
– Benedetta Pacini (University of Warwick/ The National Gallery): ‘Making and Moving Venetian Renaissance Paintings: my interviews with chief restorers in Venice and London, and archival records about Tintoretto’s transport strategy.’

11:30–11:45: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

11:45–12:45: Session 2: Attribution and Authorship
Chair: Dr Olenka Horbatsch (British Museum; PhD 2017, University of Toronto)
– James Wehn (Case Western Reserve University/ The Cleveland Museum of Art): ‘The Maker’s Image: Israhel van Meckenem, His Name, and His Copies.’
– Catherine Spirit (University of York): ‘Weaving Light: Untangling Authorship in the Windows of All Saints Church, Earsham.’

12:45–13:45: Lunch (Provided for Speakers and Chairs)

13:45–14:45: Session 3: Prestige and Patronage
Chair: Adriana Concin (Courtauld Institute)
– Dr Ilaria Taddeo (PhD 2017, IMT School for Advanced Studies, Lucca): ‘Artistic Patronage, Family Prestige and Religious Politics. The case of the Guidiccioni between Lucca and Rome (c. 1530-1550).’
– Anne-Sophie Laruelle (University of Liège): ‘Reconsidering Tapestry Patronage and Trade in the Renaissance.’

14:45–15:00: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

15:00–16:00: Session 4: Itinerancy and Interchange
Chair: Lois Haines (Warburg Institute / The National Gallery)
– Giulio Dalvit (Courtauld Institute): ‘Circulation of Drawings in Castiglione Olona: Masolino, Paolo Schiavo, Vecchietta, Domenico Veneziano and Cyriacus of Ancona.’
– Matthew Whyte (University College, Cork): ‘Stylistic Exchange and Civic Identity in Michelangelo’s work on the Arca di San Domenico in Bologna.’

16:05–16:55: Session 5: Opening New Dialogues
– Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director, Warburg Institute): ‘The Specifics of Authorship: Attributing Production.’

16:55–17:00: Concluding Remarks
17:00–18:00: Reception

Free and Open to all. Advanced booking required via Eventbrite.

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Edinburgh College of Art Trecento seminar, Artist and Authorship (6 May 2016)

Scultore, Firenze, Museo Bardini3 (1)6th May 2016
10:00 – 17:00
Hunter Lecture Theatre, Edinburgh College of Art, 74, Lauriston Place , Edinburgh

Convened by Claudia Bolgia and Luca Palozzi from the School of History of Art

This one-day international research seminar on ‘Artist and Authorship’ is designed to take stock of the field, showcase award-winning, original research and discuss different methodologies, thus charting new avenues for future research. While the research seminar’s main focus of attention is the Italian Trecento, contributions reach well beyond it to investigate different geographical areas – both East and West (Portugal, France, Spain, Byzantium) – across a broader timespan, including contemporary perspectives on the topic.

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL.

BOOK YOUR FREE TICKET(S) HERE. LIMITED CAPACITY

Programme

10.00 – 10.15 Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art), Introduction

Session 1: Visual Networks and Artistic Flows

Chair: Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art)

10.15 – 10.40 Emanuele Lugli (University of York), ‘Inventing the Network: Linking Figures and Connecting Knowledge in Trecento Italy’

10.40 – 11.05 Carla Varela Fernandes (Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal), ‘France-Catalonia-Portugal: artistic flows in the Trecento. Some examples from the Digital Index of Magistri Cataloniae’

11.05 – 11.20 Q&A

11.20 – 11.40 Coffee break

Session 2: Authorship and Self-Representation: East and West

Chair: Claudia Bolgia (Edinburgh College of Art)

11.40 – 12.05 Maria Lidova (British Museum, University of Oxford), ‘Manifestations of Authorship: Artists’ Signatures in Byzantium’

12.05 – 12.30 Giampaolo Ermini (Scuola Normale Superiore, Italy), ‘The Opere firmate nell’arte italiana / Medioevo Project : some notes on Sienese metalworkers’ signatures: goldsmiths, locksmiths, bell makers’

12.30 – 12.55 Donal Cooper (University of Cambridge), ‘The Authorship and Audience of the Meditations of the Life of Christ’

12.55 – 13.10 Q&A

13.10 – 14.00 Lunch

Session 3: Self-awareness and Reception

Chair: Claudia Bolgia (Edinburgh College of Art)

14.00 – 14.25 Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art), ‘Before the Paragone: Trecento Visual Intelligence and the Critical Misfortune of Sculptors’

14.25 – 14.50 Corin Sworn (Artist and Lecturer, Ruskin School of Art, Oxford), ‘The Mobile Screen and the Early Modern Stage: A contemporary artist’s take on borrowing from the past’

14.50 – 15.00 Q&A

15.00 – 15.20 Coffee break

Session 4: Postgraduate Research Showcase, Discussion and Conclusions

Chairs: Claudia Bolgia (Edinburgh College of Art), Robert Gibbs (University of Glasgow), John Richards (University of Glasgow), Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art)

15.20 – 15.50 Research Showcase with History of Art PhD candidates at the University of Edinburgh

Maria Gordusenko, ‘Magester Ursus and his self-representation in the church of Santi Pietro e Paolo in Ferentillo’
Amelia Hope-Jones, ‘The Elusive Artist: A Thirteenth-Century Tabernacle in the National Gallery of Scotland’
Fabian Bojkovsky, ‘A Jewish Convert as Artist: The Shrine of San Vicente, Sabina and Cristeta at the Intersection between Legend, Historicity and Propaganda’
15.50 – 16.20 Discussion

16.20 Claudia Bolgia (Edinburgh College of Art), Conclusions

For all enquiries, please email: luca.palozzi@ed.ac.uk.

Call for Papers: Creating Nothing New: Perspectives on the Faithful Copy 1300-1900 (Hanover 2014)

Call for Papers:
Creating Nothing New: Perspectives on the Faithful Copy 1300-1900
Hanover, Schloss Herrenhausen, 26-28 June 2014
Deadline: 20 January 2014

hannover_herrenhausen

Up until a few years ago art history showed little interest in the phenomenon of copies:  Versions” of “art works” that were closely related in terms of form and content were mostly dealt with in footnotes and could be found in the storage rooms of museums or as second-rate exhibits. However, the last years have seen a “renaissance of the copy”. Inspired by media theory and the transformation theories of social and cultural history the copy phenomenon has been pulled from the shadows and partially illuminated, using labels such as citation, variation, transfer medium and multiple.

Yet interestingly, the primary focus still seems to lie on the characteristics that make a copy different from the alleged “original” and thus “new”. But this emphasis on innovative and individual achievements in the process of repetition, as well as on claims of originality and authorship, means that the object of study is still being measured against something it is not inherently meant to be. The conscious approximation of a painted, drawn, printed or sculpted prototype (be it in a different or in the same medium) is thus rarely targeted. Only the realization that artistic freedom and creative autonomy are not sufficient as criteria for the aesthetic and art historical evaluation of faithful copies can lead to an appreciation of their very own qualities.

Therefore the conference aims to focus impartially on the constitutive characteristics of the faithful copy, such as similarity, exactitude and dependence. These shall be liberated from their possible negative connotations and instead analyzed as measures of quality. In addition, their discussion should provoke a fresh sight on faithful copies and help to develop ideas for their future presentation and treatment in the museum context as well as in academic research.

Possible topics may include:

  • historical concepts of truthfulness and similarity, for example in art theory
  • the faithful copy in museum practice and conservation
  • the function of faithful copies in the process of artistic creation and apprenticeship
  • faithful copies functioning as substitutes
  • faithful copies for purposes of propaganda and ostentatious reference
  • the reception of faithful images from a psychological perspective
  • the faithful copy as a gender-related concept
  • the faithful copy in relation to copyright issues
  • the faithful copy in media theory
  • faithful copies of cult images in cultural anthropology

We welcome short proposals (up to 1800 characters) for 25 minute presentations from (junior) researchers to copyconference@gmail.com until January 20th 2014.

Antonia Putzger, M.A. (TU Berlin)
Marion Heisterberg, M.A. (U Bonn)
Dr. Susanne Müller-Bechtel (TU Dresden)

This conference is funded by VolkswagenStiftung.