Tag Archives: Byzantine Empire

CFP: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

CfP ICMA Kalamazoo 2018 Moving People Shifting FrontiersCall for Papers: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean, International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13 2018
Deadline: 10 September 2017

Organizers: Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne) and Maria Alessia Rossi (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artifacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.

Conf: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era, University of Birmingham, 24-25 February 2017

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Conference: 
Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era
University of Birmingham
24-25 February 2017

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

24 Feb 2017 – 1st day
14.00-14.10 – Opening remarks: prof Leslie Brubaker, University of Birmingham
14.10-15.00 First Keynote lecture and discussion: Dr Cecily Hilsdale, McGill University, Title TBC
15.00-16.00 First panel – Chair Dr Ruth Macrides, University of Birmingham
Ivana Jevtic: Late Byzantine Painting Reconsidered: Art in Decline or Art in the Age of Decline?
Andrew Griebeler: The Greek Botanical Albums in Late Byzantine and Early Ottoman Constantinople
Maria Alessia Rossi: Political ruin or spiritual renewal? Early Palaiologan art in context
16.00-16.20 Discussion
16.30-16.50 Coffee break
17.00-17.50 Second Keynote lecture and discussion: prof Niels Gaul, University of Edinburgh: Palaiologan Byzantium(s): East Rome’s Final Two Centuries in Recent Research
18.00-19.00 Reception

25 Feb 2017 – 2nd day
9.00-9.50 Opening keynote lecture and discussion: Dr Angeliki Lymberopoulou, Open University, Palaiologan art from regional Crete: artistic decline or social progress?
10.00 -10.40 Second panel – Chair Dr Daniel Reynolds, University of Birmingham Anđela Gavrilović: The Stylistic Features of the Frescoes of the Church of the Mother of God Hodegetria in the Patriarchate of Peć (c. 1335-1337)
Ludovic Bender: Mistra and its countryside: The transformation of the late Byzantine religious landscape of Laconia
10.40-11.00 Discussion
11.00-11.20 Coffee break
11.30-12.30 Third Panel – Chair Dr Francesca Dell’Acqua, University of Birmingham Andrea Mattiello: Who’s that man? The perception of Byzantium in 15th century Italy
Tatiana Bardashova: Palaiologan Influence on the Visual Representation of the Grand Komnenoi in the Empire of Trebizond (1204-1461)
Lilyana Yordanova: The Issues of Visual Narrative, Literary Patronage and Display of Virtues of a Bulgarian Tsar in the Fourteenth century
12.30-12.50 Discussion
13.00-14.00 Lunch break

Workshop
14.10-14.50 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
14.50-15.30 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
15.40-16.00 Coffee break
16.10-16.50 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
16.50-17.00 Closing remarks: Andrea Mattiello/Maria Alessia Rossi

The programme, further information and details of how to book can be found at:

and
http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/bomgs/events/2017/reconsidering-palaiologan-arts.aspx

Current Exhibition: Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections

heaven-earthWashington, National Gallery, West Building

Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections

October 6 2013- March 2 2014

In 330 Emperor Constantine the Great moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Italy some thousand miles to the east, near the site of the ancient Greek city of Byzantium on the Bosphorus Strait linking the Aegean and Black Seas. Renamed Constantinople (now Istanbul), the city became the largest and wealthiest in the Christian world. It remained the dominant power, especially in the eastern Mediterranean, for more than 1,000 years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453. In the first-ever exhibition of Byzantine art at the Gallery, some 170 works of art, many never before lent to the United States, will be on view—among them mosaics, icons, manuscripts, jewelry, and ceramics. The works include newly discovered and unpublished objects and reveal the rich and multifaceted culture of Byzantium. Divided into five thematic sections, the exhibition explores the coexistence of paganism and Christianity, spiritual life in Byzantium, secular works of art used in the home, the intellectual life of Byzantine scholars, and the cross-influences that occurred between Byzantine and Western artists before the fall of Byzantium.

Heaven and EarthArt of Byzantium from Greek Collections presents life in Byzantium through approximately 170 works of art dating from the inception of the empire to its close. Drawn from collections throughout Greece, they include sculpture, mosaics, icons, frescoes, manuscripts, metalwork, jewelry, glass, embroideries, coins, and ceramics. The works are arranged in five sections: From the Ancient to the Byzantine WorldSpiritual Life,Pleasures of LifeIntellectual Life, and The Last Phase: Crosscurrents.

Organization: The exhibition was organized by the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports, Athens, with the collaboration of the Benaki Museum, Athens, and in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

Sponsors: The exhibition’s international tour is made possible by major funding from OPAP S.A.
Financial support is also provided by the A.G. Leventis Foundation.

Other Venues: J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, April 9–August 25, 2014