Tag Archives: byzantine

CONFERENCE: Pantokrator 900: Cultural Memories of a Byzantine Complex (August 7-10 2018), ANAMED Istanbul

CONFERENCE: Pantokrator 900: Cultural Memories of a Byzantine Complex, 7-10 August 2018, ANAMED Istanbul

The Christ Pantokrator Complex (Zeyrek Camii, a UNESCO World Heritage Site) that included the mausoleum of the imperial dynasty, a monastery, a hospital, an orphanage, a home of the elderly and a poorhouse was founded in 1118 by Empress Piroska-Eirene and Emperor John II Komnenos. The second largest Byzantine church still standing in Istanbul after the Hagia Sophia, the Pantokrator was the most ambitious project of the Komnenian renaissance and the most impressive construction of twelfth-century Byzantine architecture. To commemorate the nine hundred years of the Pantokrator Complex, the Department of Medieval Studies at CEU Budapest and the Hungarian Hagiography Society organize, in collaboration with LABEX RESMED of Sorbonne-Paris, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, and the Hungarian Institute in Istanbul an international conference that brings together scholars from diverse scholarly traditions to discuss the social, architectural and spiritual meanings of this outstanding monument.

Tuesday, August 7

9- 9:30 Marianne Sághy (CEU and ELTE Budapest), Gábor Fodor, director of the Hungarian Cultural Istitute in Istanbul – welcome and opening of the workshop
9:30-10 Albrecht Berger (Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich) – Celebrating foundations: from the Pantokrator to Zeyrek Camii
10:30-11 coffee break
11-11:30 Béatrice Caseau (Université Paris IV, Sorbonne) — Spiritual and physical healing at the Pantokrator Monastery
11:30-12:30 Roundtable Discussion: Monuments and New Trends in Byzantine Studies
12:30 -2 pm lunch break
2 pm-2:30 pm Floris Bernard (University of Ghent – CEU Budapest) – Empress Eirene in Komnenian Poetry: Perceptions of Gender, Empire and Space
3-3:30 coffee
3:30-4 Zoltán Szegvári (PhD student, University of Szeged) The Image of the Latins in Late Byzantine Epistolography
4:30-5 Etele Kiss (Hungarian National Museum, Budapest) –  Visual and Spiritual Portraits of Eirene, the Co-Founder of the Pantokrator
5:30-6 Cicek Dereli (PhD student, CEU Budapest) Cultural Heritage in Istanbul –  Monasteries in Focus

Wednesday, August 8On-the-Spot: Monument and museum visits guided by David Hendrix and Şerif Yenen

Thursday, August 9

10-10:30 Marianne Sághy Greek Culture in Early Árpádian Hungary
11-11:30 Coffee break
11:30-12 Béla Zsolt Szakács (Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest) – Between Byzantium and Italy: the Art of Twelfth-Century Hungary
12:30-2 pm lunch break
2-2:30 pm Márton Rózsa (PhD student, ELTE University of Budapest) — The Byzantine Second-Tier Élite in the Komnenian Period
3-3:30 Lioba Theis (University of Vienna) – Light Symbolism in the Pantokrator
4-4:30 coffee break
4:30-5 Hâluk Çetinkaya (Mimar Sinan University, Istanbul) Funeral Spaces in the Pantokrator Monastery
5:30-6 Etele Kiss (Hungarian National Museum, Budapest) Cosmology between Byzantium and the Occident in the Twelfth Century: Piroska-Eirene and the Opus Sectile Floor of the Pantokrator Monastery
6-6:30 Discussion and conclusions

Friday, August 10

On-the-Spot: Byzantine City Walks guided by David Hendrix and Şerif Yenen

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CFP: ‘Hurt and healing: people, texts, and material culture in the Eastern Mediterranean’ – 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies (University of Birmingham) (deadline 21st April 2018)

Hurt and Healing: people, texts, and material culture in the Eastern Mediterranean’.

The 19th Annual CBOMGS Postgraduate Colloquium

2nd June 2018

The Committee is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK.

The concepts of hurt, trauma and healing cross between the different disciplines that deal with Eastern Mediterranean. The colloquium aims to explore transformations and multifarious dimensions of the notions of trauma and wreckage, and their opposition, healing, from the Late Antiquity to the Present.

Whilst serving as antitheses to one another they are also complementary. After destruction and breakage, comes the need for repair. However, when a broken textile’s ripped edges are joined again, the visible seam signifies the damage that has happened. Trauma and healing are key concepts in medicine, psychology, and sociology. However, political ideology has constantly used them in order to justify the rising and the existence of authoritarian regimes. In the past, medicine, saints, and magic offered different ways for healing the body and the soul. The current aim of restoration practices is to heal remnants of cultural heritage after damage and to prevent damage with appropriate conservation strategies.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Healing power of saints and healing people in society;
  • Medicine and magic;
  • Cultural heritage and material culture: restoration and preservation practices, as well as preventive actions for the preservation;
  • The individual aspects of trauma, especially in relation to the politics of gender, sexuality, class, race, and identity (sexual abuse, domestic violence, shame and fear, death and mourning or melancholia);
  • Collective experiences of trauma (war, genocide, terrorism, victims and perpetrators, practices of memory and oblivion);
  • Migration from the Late Antiquity to the current migration crisis and harrowing events in refugee camps;
  • Public health and medical, therapeutic approaches to illnesses and trauma;
  • Texts and images related to medical practices

Papers of approximately 20 minutes related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than Saturday 21st April 2018 to 2018cbomgscolloquium@gmail.com.  Applicants will be notified of selection by 28th April 2018.

 

For more information click here: https://cbomgs2018colloquium.wordpress.com/

Job Opportunity Icon Museum Recklinghausen Deadline 12/03/2018

Recklinghausen Job Opportunity

Recklinghausen
Application deadline: Mar 12, 2018

 Museumsleitung
für das Ikonen-Museum

Das 1956 eröffnete Ikonen-Museum Recklinghausen gilt als bedeutendstes Museum ostkirchlicher Kunst außerhalb der orthodoxen Länder. Über 3.500 Ikonen, Goldstickereien, Miniaturen, Holz- und Metallarbeiten aus Russland, Griechenland, den Balkanländern und Äthiopien vermitteln einen um-fassenden Überblick über die vielfältigen Themen und die stilistische Entwicklung der Ikonenmalerei und der Kleinkunst im christlichen Osten. Die koptische Abteilung des Ikonen-Museums dokumentiert den Übergang von der heidnischen Spätantike zum frühen Christentum in Ägypten mit hervor-ragenden Werken wie Steinreliefs, Geweben, Gegenständen aus Bronze und Ton sowie einigen Mumienporträts.

Die Ruhrfestspielstadt Recklinghausen mit rund 120.000 Einwohnern ist das Kultur-, Einkaufs- und Verwaltungszentrum des Kreises Recklinghausen zwischen Ruhrgebiet und Münsterland mit besten Verkehrsanbindungen, Wohn-, Erholungs- und Bildungsmöglichkeiten. Sie bietet ihren Bürgerinnen und Bürgern u.a. eine Vielzahl von attraktiven, kulturellen Angeboten.

Der Fachbereich Kultur, Wissenschaft und Stadtgeschichte sucht im Rahmen einer Nachfolgerege-lung zum 01.12.2018 eine

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Call for Papers Journal of Icon Studies Deadline 01/06/2018

Vladimir Icon

The Journal of Icon Studies is now accepting submissions for its second issue, scheduled for online publication in December 2018. We welcome contributions from scholars working across a wide disciplinary range, including art history, literature and film, religious studies, gender and cultural studies, history and anthropology, conservation and museum studies.

The Journal of Icon Studies is an online, peer-reviewed publication dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of icons around the globe, from the Byzantine period to the modern era. It serves as an international forum for new scholarship on the theoretical, theological and historical significance of icons, their place within a broad cultural and artistic context, as well as their conservation, collecting, and exhibiting. The journal includes reviews of books and exhibitions, archival discoveries, and translations of primary documents.

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CONF: Il Pallio di San Lorenzo (Florence, 1-2 Feb 18)

Florence, Opificio delle Pietre Dure / Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, February 1 – 02, 2018

Il Pallio di San Lorenzo: Dopo il restauro e prima del suo ritorno a Genova
Workshop

pallio.jpgThis workshop focuses on the so-called ‘Pallio di San Lorenzo’, a thirteenth-century Byzantine textile given to the Cathedral of San Lorenzo in Genoa within the framework of diplomatic relations between Genoa and the Byzantine court. The bright red samite embroidered with various coloured silk threads, as well threads in silver and gold, represents the Lives of St. Lawrence, St. Sixtus, and St. Hippolytus, accompanied by Latin inscriptions, and a depiction of Michael VIII Palaiologos visiting the cathedral of Genoa. The textile’s actual state of preservation after many years of meticulous restoration and the results of the recent analyses of the dye, the stitching technique, and the precious metal threads provides insight into  its unique materiality. Furthermore, its specific iconography, Latin paleography, and possible functions offer various points of departure for a comprehensive reconsideration of the Pallio. This work epitomizes the transcultural encounters in the Mediterranean. This interdisciplinary workshop, organized in collaboration with the textile restoration experts of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure and the Museo Sant’Agostino, Genoa, is an extraordinary occasion to discuss the results of the restoration of the ‘Pallio di San Lorenzo’ before its return to Genoa.

A collaboration between the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, Firenze, the Museo di Sant’Agostino, Genova and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut
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CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).