Tag Archives: byzantine

CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

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Ancient & Modern Prize 2017/18

aandmmpgeggAncient & Modern Prize 2017/18
Deadline: Feb 28, 2018

Ancient & Modern: A Prize for Original Research

The 2017/18 Ancient & Modern Prize, an award of £1,000, will be given to a candidate aged under 27 or over 60 for a research project. The Godfrey Goodwin Prize of £500, in honour of the distinguished Ottoman architectural historian Godfrey Goodwin (1921–2005), will be awarded to the runner-up.

Sponsored by HALI and CORNUCOPIA
and by BONHAMS, CHRISTIES and SOTHEBY’S

The project should relate to any of the subject areas covered by the sponsoring journals: http://www.hali.com/ and http://www.cornucopia.net/

Applications should be short and outline the project in up to 500 words, accompanied by your age, anticipated results, and contact address.

Application details: http://www.ancientandmodern.co.uk/

JOB: Lecturer in Byzantine History, Kings College London, UK

kcl_red_logoJOB: Lecturer in Byzantine History, Kings College London, UK:
Deadline: 6th November 2017

The Departments of Classics and History are seeking to appoint a Lecturer in Byzantine History to cover for staff on research leave. The successful candidate will teach over a range of topics (as indicated in the Job Pack) in collaboration with colleagues, assist with the pastoral support of students, and contribute to the research life of the two Departments. They will be helped through mentoring and training to develop their career.

Candidates should specialise in any aspect of Byzantine history and culture. They will have a record of inspiring teaching and a commitment to academic development of the subject and its promotion through public engagement.

The selection process will include a brief presentation and a panel interview, and will be held in the week beginning Monday 20 November 2017.

For informal queries about the role please contact Professor Abigail Woods abigail.woods@kcl.ac.uk Head of the Department of History, or Professor Dominic Rathbone dominic.rathbone@kcl.ac.uk Head of the Department of Classics.

This post will be a Fixed Term Contract for 18 months, starting 1 January 2018.

For further information and application procedure, please click here

CFP: Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session, 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018

mjc-logo-lrgCall for For Session Proposals, Mary Jaharis Center’s sponsored session, 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018
Deadline: September 1, 2017
The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.
The thematic strand for the 2018 IMC is “Memory.” See the IMC Call for Papers (https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2018_call.html) for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.
Session proposals should be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/25th-imc). The deadline for submission is September 1, 2017. Proposals should include:
**Title
**100-word session abstract
**Session moderator and academic affiliation
**Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
**CV
Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.
If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.
The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.
Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Call for Applications: French Summer School Of Byzantine Studies, 30 August-5 September 2017, Bucharest – DEADLINE TODAY

Deadline: 9 August
The Faculty of History of the University of Bucharest, the Centre Régional Francophone de Recherches Avancées en Sciences Humaines et Sociales de Bucarest (CEREFREA–Villa Noël), and the Research Institute of the University of Bucharest, with the financial support of the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie and the scientific coordination of Professor Paolo Odorico (CéSor, EHESS, Paris), have organized a summer school of Byzantine studies on the topic STUDYING THE BYZANTINE WORLD. METHODOLOGIES AND INTERPRETATIONS to be held in Bucharest, from the 30th of August to the 5th of September 2017.
Those eligible: students enrolled in a master’s program, doctoral students,
postdocs and students enrolling in master’s or doctoral programs in 2017. The students must understand the two languages of the summer school (French / English). At the end of the course, certificates of participation will be issued to students, equivalent to 12 ECTS. To enable students to participate in the courses, the organizers launch a call for applications, providing:
•Free participation in the course and dinners (for maximum 30 students)
•Free accommodation in the CEREFREA–Villa Noël (for maximum 8
students)
•AUF offered a grant covering the travel expenses and accommodation for some foreign PhD students established in the countries of Central and Oriental Europe.
The selection of the students who benefit of these supports will be made on scientific and academic criteria.
How to apply:
• Covering letter
•Curriculum studiorum indicating clearly studies already completed, research activity and field of research
• Other documents the candidate considers useful in support of his application.
Email to be sent by applicants to byzantinologie@yahoo.com in the subject line: bourse d’études–Université d’été–Bucarest or Fellowship for Summer University in Bucharest.
The selected candidates will receive a notification on the 14th of August.

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting400crop.jpegConference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed.

PROGRAMME

9:30 – 10:00 Registration & Coffee
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome
SECTION I: Ancient and Medieval Collections

(Chair: Cecily Hennessy, Christie’s Education)

10:15 – 10:40 Collecting liturgical objects in thirteenth and fourteenth-century Castile

Maeve O’Donnell-Morales (Courtauld Institute of Art)

10:40 – 11:05 The saint-king’s collection: The treasure of grande châsse in the Sainte-Chapelle

Emily Guerry (University of Kent)

11:05 – 11:30 ‘Through me rulers rule’: A Curious History of Imperial Coronation Regalia

Zoë Opačić (Birkbeck, University of London)

11:30 – 11:55 E.P. Warren, Greek art and the Pan Painter

Amy Smith (University of Reading)

11:55 – 12:10 Discussion
12:10 – 13:40 LUNCH
SECTION II: New Approaches to Collections

(Chair: Sadie Pickup, Christie’s Education) 

13:45 – 14:10 The Digital Pilgrim Project: approaching large collections of miniature art

Amy Jeffs (University of Cambridge)

14:10 – 14:35 From Monastic Libraries to Computer Screens: Collecting Late Antique Illumination through the Centuries

Peter Toth (British Library)

14:35 – 15:00 Collections, Controversies and the Copts: Deciphering the Late Antique Textiles of Egypt

Anna Kelley (University of Birmingham)

15:00 – 15:15 Discussion
15:15 – 15:45 COFFEE & TEA
SECTION III: Private and Public Collections

(Chair: Jana Gajdošová, Christie’s Education)

15:50 – 16:15 The intersection between collecting and scholarship: some personal experience

Michael Carter (English Heritage)

16:15 – 16:40 Exploring the Collection of George R Harding

Naomi Speakman (British Museum)

16:40 – 17:05 Title to be Confirmed

Claudio Corsi (Christie’s, London)

17:05 – 17:15 Discussion
17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks
18:00 Drinks Reception

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference – 23 March 2017

collectingCollecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed. Speakers include: Maeve O’Donnell-Morales, Zoe Opacic, Emily Guerry, Amy Smith, Peter Toth, Amy Jeffs, Anna Kelley, Michael Carter, Naomi Speakman, and Claudio Corsi.

For full programme and tickets, see here.