Tag Archives: byzantine

Job Opportunity Icon Museum Recklinghausen Deadline 12/03/2018

Recklinghausen Job Opportunity

Application deadline: Mar 12, 2018

für das Ikonen-Museum

Das 1956 eröffnete Ikonen-Museum Recklinghausen gilt als bedeutendstes Museum ostkirchlicher Kunst außerhalb der orthodoxen Länder. Über 3.500 Ikonen, Goldstickereien, Miniaturen, Holz- und Metallarbeiten aus Russland, Griechenland, den Balkanländern und Äthiopien vermitteln einen um-fassenden Überblick über die vielfältigen Themen und die stilistische Entwicklung der Ikonenmalerei und der Kleinkunst im christlichen Osten. Die koptische Abteilung des Ikonen-Museums dokumentiert den Übergang von der heidnischen Spätantike zum frühen Christentum in Ägypten mit hervor-ragenden Werken wie Steinreliefs, Geweben, Gegenständen aus Bronze und Ton sowie einigen Mumienporträts.

Die Ruhrfestspielstadt Recklinghausen mit rund 120.000 Einwohnern ist das Kultur-, Einkaufs- und Verwaltungszentrum des Kreises Recklinghausen zwischen Ruhrgebiet und Münsterland mit besten Verkehrsanbindungen, Wohn-, Erholungs- und Bildungsmöglichkeiten. Sie bietet ihren Bürgerinnen und Bürgern u.a. eine Vielzahl von attraktiven, kulturellen Angeboten.

Der Fachbereich Kultur, Wissenschaft und Stadtgeschichte sucht im Rahmen einer Nachfolgerege-lung zum 01.12.2018 eine

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Call for Papers Journal of Icon Studies Deadline 01/06/2018

Vladimir Icon

The Journal of Icon Studies is now accepting submissions for its second issue, scheduled for online publication in December 2018. We welcome contributions from scholars working across a wide disciplinary range, including art history, literature and film, religious studies, gender and cultural studies, history and anthropology, conservation and museum studies.

The Journal of Icon Studies is an online, peer-reviewed publication dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of icons around the globe, from the Byzantine period to the modern era. It serves as an international forum for new scholarship on the theoretical, theological and historical significance of icons, their place within a broad cultural and artistic context, as well as their conservation, collecting, and exhibiting. The journal includes reviews of books and exhibitions, archival discoveries, and translations of primary documents.

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CONF: Il Pallio di San Lorenzo (Florence, 1-2 Feb 18)

Florence, Opificio delle Pietre Dure / Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, February 1 – 02, 2018

Il Pallio di San Lorenzo: Dopo il restauro e prima del suo ritorno a Genova

pallio.jpgThis workshop focuses on the so-called ‘Pallio di San Lorenzo’, a thirteenth-century Byzantine textile given to the Cathedral of San Lorenzo in Genoa within the framework of diplomatic relations between Genoa and the Byzantine court. The bright red samite embroidered with various coloured silk threads, as well threads in silver and gold, represents the Lives of St. Lawrence, St. Sixtus, and St. Hippolytus, accompanied by Latin inscriptions, and a depiction of Michael VIII Palaiologos visiting the cathedral of Genoa. The textile’s actual state of preservation after many years of meticulous restoration and the results of the recent analyses of the dye, the stitching technique, and the precious metal threads provides insight into  its unique materiality. Furthermore, its specific iconography, Latin paleography, and possible functions offer various points of departure for a comprehensive reconsideration of the Pallio. This work epitomizes the transcultural encounters in the Mediterranean. This interdisciplinary workshop, organized in collaboration with the textile restoration experts of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure and the Museo Sant’Agostino, Genoa, is an extraordinary occasion to discuss the results of the restoration of the ‘Pallio di San Lorenzo’ before its return to Genoa.

A collaboration between the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, Firenze, the Museo di Sant’Agostino, Genova and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut
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CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

Ancient & Modern Prize 2017/18

aandmmpgeggAncient & Modern Prize 2017/18
Deadline: Feb 28, 2018

Ancient & Modern: A Prize for Original Research

The 2017/18 Ancient & Modern Prize, an award of £1,000, will be given to a candidate aged under 27 or over 60 for a research project. The Godfrey Goodwin Prize of £500, in honour of the distinguished Ottoman architectural historian Godfrey Goodwin (1921–2005), will be awarded to the runner-up.

Sponsored by HALI and CORNUCOPIA

The project should relate to any of the subject areas covered by the sponsoring journals: http://www.hali.com/ and http://www.cornucopia.net/

Applications should be short and outline the project in up to 500 words, accompanied by your age, anticipated results, and contact address.

Application details: http://www.ancientandmodern.co.uk/

JOB: Lecturer in Byzantine History, Kings College London, UK

kcl_red_logoJOB: Lecturer in Byzantine History, Kings College London, UK:
Deadline: 6th November 2017

The Departments of Classics and History are seeking to appoint a Lecturer in Byzantine History to cover for staff on research leave. The successful candidate will teach over a range of topics (as indicated in the Job Pack) in collaboration with colleagues, assist with the pastoral support of students, and contribute to the research life of the two Departments. They will be helped through mentoring and training to develop their career.

Candidates should specialise in any aspect of Byzantine history and culture. They will have a record of inspiring teaching and a commitment to academic development of the subject and its promotion through public engagement.

The selection process will include a brief presentation and a panel interview, and will be held in the week beginning Monday 20 November 2017.

For informal queries about the role please contact Professor Abigail Woods abigail.woods@kcl.ac.uk Head of the Department of History, or Professor Dominic Rathbone dominic.rathbone@kcl.ac.uk Head of the Department of Classics.

This post will be a Fixed Term Contract for 18 months, starting 1 January 2018.

For further information and application procedure, please click here