Tag Archives: Emotion

The GCMS Summer Symposium 2018: Emotion and Devotion in Medieval Europe (21/06/2018)

0434f4d0c9a027131f98d2fc909e8ca4This symposium will explore the growing area of research into the study of male and female medieval lay piety, and is being run by the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies in collaboration with the University of Reading History Department Research Cluster ‘Emotion, Devotion and Belief’.

Speakers to include:

  • Robert Swanson (University of Birmingham)
  • Miri Rubin (Queen Mary, University of London)
  • Amanda Murphy (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan)
  • Katherine Lewis (University of Huddersfield)
  • Sarah Bastow (University of Huddersfield)
  • Sarah Macmillan (University of Birmingham)
  • Paul Davies (University of Reading)
  • Helen Parish (University of Reading)
  • Rebecca Rist (University of Reading)

The Symposium is held on Thursday 21 June 2018, from 9am to 6pm, at the Van Emden Lecture Theatre and GCMS Room (G27L) (Edith Morley, Whiteknights Campus, University of Reading). Coffee, lunch and tea will be provided. Registration cost: £10

To book your place please use this link: https://www.reading.ac.uk/GCMS/GCMSEvents.aspx

For more information on how to book your place or any other queries do contact: GCMS@reading.ac.uk or r.a.c.rist@reading.ac.uk

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Coll & Cortes Medieval Spain Seminar Series: Images, devotion and emotion in 13th- and 14th-century Castile (18 April 2018)

toro-santa-clara-600x600What was the role of images in the religious experience of Castilian people of the 13th and 14th centuries? There is no clear answer, and the scarcity of written evidence has prompted much problematic speculation. However, on the basis of the images themselves and of relevant literary sources, including the well-known Cantigas de Santa María and works by 14th-century authors such as Juan Ruiz and Juan Manuel, it is possible to explore a number of key issues. The talk will be divided into three sections. One focuses on the 13th century: ‘Active images: the Cantigas de Santa María and their aftermath’. Another looks to the 14th century: ‘Passive images: the reception and dissemination of the Crucifixus dolorosus in Castile’. And it concludes by looking ‘beyond’ Art History. In the 1960s a Spanish politician coined the (in)famous tourist slog, ‘Spain is different’. His aim was to encourage foreigners to visit Spain, but the slogan is representative of a commonplace that has been repeated time and again since the Romantic era. Ultimately, my talk offers an invitation to reconsider whether Castilian and Spanish devotional practices are really so very different from those recorded elsewhere in medieval western Europe. Continue reading