Tag Archives: Mediterranean Studies

Conference Mediterranean Artistic Interaction, Valletta 09/03/2018, Registration Deadline 07/03/2018

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University of Malta, Valletta campus, March 9, 2018
Registration deadline: Mar 7, 2018

The Dynamics of Mediterranean Artistic Interaction in the Late Medieval and Renaissance Periods
International Conference – Department of Art and Art History, University of Malta

Convener: Dr Charlene Vella

13:30 – 14:00
Registration

14:00
Welcome

First session (14:15 – 16:00) — chaired by Keith Sciberras

14:15 – 14:45
Mario Buhagiar (University of Malta): The Siculo-Byzantinesque ‘Virgin of St Luke’ at Mdina Cathedral, Malta

14:45 – 15:15
Kayoko Ichikawa (Universitè de Fribourg): The thirteenth-century Coronation of the Virgin in the context of Mediterranean artistic interaction

15:15 – 15:45
Keith Buhagiar (University of Malta): The Central Mediterranean dimension of Maltese Medieval cave-churches and their artistic relevance

15:45 – 16:00 question time

16:00 – 16:30 break

Second session (16:30  18:30) — chaired by Mario Buhagiar

16:30 – 17:00
Michele Bacci (Universitè de Fribourg): Dynamics of Cultural and Artistic Exchange in Hospitaller Rhodes (1310-1522)

17:00 – 17:30
Charlene Vella (University of Malta): The Madonna del Soccorso triptych at the Mdina Cathedral Museum: attribution and new considerations

17:30 – 18:00
Peter Humfrey (University of St Andrews): Venice, Cyprus and Venus

18:00 : 18:30 question time

18:30 Reception

Registration form: https://www.um.edu.mt/arts/historyart/form

For more information, contact the convener, Dr Charlene Vella on charlene.vella@um.edu.mt

Venue: Auditorium, University of Malta Valletta Campus, St Paul Street, Valletta

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CFP: Mediterranean Cities in Transition (7-11 June 2017: Glasgow)

Med+Seminar+SealProposals are being sought for “Mediterranean Cities in Transition,” a session at the  Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) Conference to be held in Glasgow, on 7-11 June  2017.

Co-chairs:  D. Fairchild Juggles, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Department of Landscape Architecture, Champaign, IL 61820

Nikolai Bakirtzis, The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus

Mediterranean cities with long histories preserve the physical evidence of their role as economic and cultural hubs. The historic complexity of their contemporary state reveals their transition through time, with the medieval and early modern period setting the foundations for subsequent growth and development. As cities change through time, visible historic layers emerge (sometimes exposed by excavation) that reveal reforms made for new social needs. The layered architectural heritage is an integral part of the urban fabric of many modern cities, shaping the character and lived experience of the city. But a building’s value today is often very different from how it was valued at the time it was built. The material object connects past and present in a deeply meaningful way, but it does so on new terms. Therefore, making connections between past and present can pose challenges as contemporary residents try to determine the role of the historic fabric in contemporary rapidly growing cities.

We invite papers that will consider the city as a heritage field:

1) How and why does medieval fabric survive to the present?

2) How does this fabric of monuments, architectural tissue (walls and gates), urban spaces, and services (water supply and sewage) serve as a resource for the present? Is the value utilitarian, in the sense of a usable palimpsest, or is it valued because of how it is interpreted?

3) Does medieval architecture guide the subsequent character of the city? If so, does the old footprint pose a limit to growth, its narrow streets and enclosure walls impeding the city’s entry into modernity, or in contrast, does heritage fabric enrich a city’s sense of identity, cultural vigor, and connection to its own place?

4) What is the role of medieval architectural heritage in the context of contested and divided urban space?

HOW TO SUBMIT A PROPOSAL: Please submit your 300-word abstract for a paper by 3:00pm on June 7, using the SAH conference portal: http://www.sah.org/conferences-and-programs/2017-conference-glasgow/call-for-papers.

Note that only papers submitted through this portal will be accepted. We will not read nor can we accept papers sent directly to the co-chairs.

 

Fellowship: Andrew W. Mellon Mediterranean Regional Research Fellowship Programme

antonio_millo_bacino_del_mediterraneoFellowship: Andrew W. Mellon Mediterranean Regional Research Fellowship Program
Applications open: September 2016 – Application deadline: January 2017

The Council of American Overseas Research Centers is pleased to announce a new focused regional fellowship program enabling pre- and early post-doctoral scholars to carry out research in the humanities and related social sciences in countries bordering the Mediterranean and served by American overseas research centers. Funding for this program is generously provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Scholars must be:

  • a US citizen or Permanent Resident;
  • be a doctoral candidate or a scholar who obtained his/her Ph.D. within the last ten years (September 2005 or later);
  • propose a three to nine month humanities or related social science research project;
  • and propose travel to one or more Mediterranean region country, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center.

Fellowship awards will not exceed $33,500.

Information: http://www.caorc.org/#!fellowships/c17cq

Call for Contributions: Critically Mediterranean: Aesthetics, Theory, Hermeneutics, Culture (Edited Volume)

Call for Contributions: 
Critically Mediterranean: Aesthetics, Theory, Hermeneutics, Culture
ed. by Yasser Elhariry (Dartmouth College) & Edwige Tamalet Talbayev (Tulane University)
Deadline: 15 December 2014

This is a call for contributors for Critically Mediterranean: Aesthetics, Theory, Hermeneutics, Culture, a peer-reviewed edited volume co-edited by Yasser Elhariry (Dartmouth College) & Edwige Tamalet Talbayev (Tulane University).

satelliteMeditPointing to the crux of much debate and scholarship in Mediterranean Studies, W. V. Harris has defined Mediterraneanism as “the doctrine that there are distinctive characteristics which the cultures of the Mediterranean have, or have had, in common” (1).  A pervasive approach to the region in the disciplines of history and anthropology, the concept has fruitfully brought to light the presence of “common denominators” underlying the region’s past that warrant a comparative reading of local history across broad spans of time and space. Based on excavating millennia-old histories of ever-shifting interactions at the micro-level (Horden and Purcell’s “connectivity”), this approach has striven to move the focus away from the myriad local histories unfolding across the Mediterranean’s coastlands to bring the space of the sea as a principle of integration into relief. Highlighting wide-ranging forms of mobility, interconnectedness, and analytical fluidity in their adjustable Mediterranean model, these conceptions have emphasized the material flows running across the sea and its shore-lands, and the human activities that they have supported. As Peregrine Horden observes in his and Sharon Kinoshita’s Companion to Mediterranean History, “There seems to be no limit to the ways in which the Mediterranean region may be reimagined, as a sea, as an area involving physical movements, maritime spaces, territorial arrangements, and political processes that seek to transcend national boundaries and enmities” (5).

Moving the chronology and critical purviews of the field forward, this volume seeks to interrogate how theories and methodologies of Mediterranean Studies may bear on the modern period. Beyond the dominant mapping of the region in ancient, medieval and early modern contexts, there are important questions to be answered about our critical understandings of the modern Mediterranean and its arts and cultures that have a direct bearing on our understanding of the modern/contemporary world. This volume probes the critical cut of the Mediterranean as a theoretical entity, as an aesthetic, theoretical, and hermeneutic category for the interpretation and analysis of culture, and as a space of artistic and linguistic density and coterminous symbolic geographies. We propose to examine its critical potential in the age of nationalistic projects, global capitalism, colonial modernity, and postmodernism.

With these guiding principles in mind, we encourage contributions that explore material, visual, literary and linguistic cultures of “the Mediterranean as a spatial constellation undergoing recurring formation and dissolution,” in order to “make the notion of a modern Mediterranean plausible and reveal its structural similarities and connections with the sea’s previous lives” (Ben-Yehoyada 107). Teetering between the unenviable status of romantic delusion and the nefarious influence of residual (self)orientalizing dynamics, the Mediterranean as a conceptual tool first needs to liquidate its fraught exoticist heritage. With the advent of European imperialism in the Mediterranean in the 19th century, dealing with the legacy of globalization also requires attending to the fractures, inequalities, and forms of disenfranchisement that the new world order has engendered (what Ian Morris has dubbed “winners and losers” in relation to Mediterraneization). Alongside Iain Chamber’s “interrupted” paradigm, concepts of critical/ alternative modernities anchored in the sea are relevant to scrutinizing the fruitfulness of the Mediterranean construct to these theorizations.

We are thus seeking contributions that (1) present readings of an original, modern Mediterranean archive or corpus, and (2) rigorously, even polemically, argue what constitutes the archive/corpus’ Mediterraneanism.

We especially encourage proposals that address a combination of the following possible lines of inquiry:

  • Origins and genealogies. Sharon Kinoshita has aptly suggested that “Mediterranean studies is less a way of defining or delimiting a geographic space (as in the famous formulation of the Mediterranean as the region of the olive and the vine) than a heuristic device for remapping traditional disciplinary divides” (602). What are the material, visual, literary and linguistic limits to our grasping of the Mediterranean? What are the needs and natures of disciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and interdisciplinary work? What is the role of competing genealogies within field formation? In turn, how may the births and beginnings of disciplines inform our critical understandings of the modern Mediterranean and its arts and cultures?
  • Mediterranean representations. How do cultural formations, historical processes, and elements of style develop? How do considerations of genre and intertextuality inform their emergence? What artistic and intellectual tropes and turns (for example: nostalgia, cosmopolitanism, religion and mysticism) inflect the Mediterranean as a rhetorical tool or figure within their respective genealogies?
  • Mediterranean translations. What roles does language perform in the modern Mediterranean? What and where are the untreatable, untranslatable dimensions of Mediterranean expression? How do linguistic codes intersect with the visual, the sonic, and the (inter)medial? What are the specificities of—or relationships between—literature, visual culture, cinema, music, media and intermediality?
  • Philosophy, phenomenology and the poetics of space and time. Edgar Morin reports that it is in the 16th century that the Mediterranean was given its name, which meant sea-at-the-center-of-the-lands (33), but what if the Mediterranean in fact decenters and disorients? How do modern representations of the Mediterranean treat the nature of the sea? Beyond dialectics of change and permanence, how does the incursion of the Mediterranean into time evoke discrepant temporalities (plural, unpredictable, ephemeral, internally experienced, immanent or dormant)?
  • (Bio)politics. Chakrabarty has pointed how the Mediterranean “environment […] had an agentive presence in Braudel’s pages” (205). Does the modern Mediterranean still play “an agentive presence” in contemporary politics? In an era where “the Marxist critique of capitalism” and “Marxist internationalism undermined the idea of the nation” (Morin 38-39), what is the Mediterranean’s relationship to la raison d’état, or the nation-state as a heuristic core of critical practice? What becomes of the relationship between nation-states and languages, between identities and affiliations? How does it call into question national literary languages? How would (bio)political questions concerning revolution, democracy, migration, transnationalism, and minority and second-generation human rights be articulated and addressed within these discourses?
  • Mediterranean identities and self-identification. How do we key in the elaboration of local identity and community formation? What are the attendant regional politics and polemics? What are the dialectical relations to forms of being in the world ensconced in the discreteness of micro-localities? How may identity markers be uniquely declined beyond the dominant rhetoric of the right to difference? How may this entail the emergence of a transnational consciousness or of a specific ethos? How may we think beyond subjective experiences of the Mediterranean?
  • The Mediterranean/Mediterraneans. How do we balance the focus on the micro with the need for the macro (Abulafia, 2006) and the relation to other sea-centered logics? What are the geographical limits of the modern Mediterranean? What is the place of the critical Mediterranean within reflections on “new thalassology” (Horden and Purcell, 2006) and “thalassocracies” (Abulafia, 2014)? Should the model be applied beyond the region? What is its intellectual currency across geographical divides?

Detailed abstracts (500 words) are due by December 1, 2014 to Edwige Tamalet Talbayev (etamalet@tulane.edu) and Yasser Elhariry (yasser.elhariry@dartmouth.edu). Contributors will be notified of acceptance by December 15, 2014. Completed manuscripts (6,000 words) are due byJune 1, 2015. Manuscripts will be rigorously edited prior to submission to the press. Although final placement of the volume will be contingent on the outcome of the press’ peer-review process, Brian Catlos and Sharon Kinoshita, the editors of Palgrave Macmillan’s new Mediterranean Studies series, have expressed interest in the volume.

References
Abulafia, David. “Mediterraneans.” Rethinking the Mediterranean. Ed. W. V. Harris. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2006. 64-93.
———. “Thalassocracies.” A Companion to Mediterranean History. Ed. Peregrine Horden and Sharon Kinoshita. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2014. 139-153.
Ben-Yehoyada, Naor “Mediterranean Modernity?” A Companion to Mediterranean History. Ed. Peregrine Horden and Sharon Kinoshita. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2014. 107-121.
Chakrabarty, Dipesh. “The Climate of History: Four Theses.” Critical Inquiry 35 (2009): 197-222.
Chambers, Iain. Mediterranean Crossings: The Politics of an Interrupted Modernity. Durham: Duke UP, 2008.
Harris, W. V., ed. Rethinking the Mediterranean. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2006.
Horden, Peregrine. “Introduction.” A Companion to Mediterranean History. Ed. Peregrine Horden and Sharon Kinoshita. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2014. 1-7.
Horden, Peregrine and Nicholas Purcell. The Corrupting Sea: A Study of Mediterranean History. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2000.
———. “The Mediterranean and ‘the New Thalassology.’” The American Historical Review 111.3 (2006): 722-740.
Kinoshita, Sharon. “Medieval Mediterranean Literature.” PMLA 124.2 (2009): 600-608.
Morin, Edgar. “Penser la Méditerranée et méditerranéiser la pensée.” Confluences Méditerranée 28 (2009): 33-47.
Morris, Ian. “Mediterraneanization.” Mediterranean Historical Review 18.2 (2003): 30-55.

CFP: Mediterranean Studies Association (Athens, May 27-30, 2015)

Call for Papers:
Eighteenth Annual International Congress of the Mediterranean Studies
University of Athens, 27-30 May 2015)
1 February 2015

parathThe Eighteenth Annual International Congress of the Mediterranean Studies Association will be held on May 27-30, 2015, at the School of Theology, University of Athens, in Athens, Greece. Proposals are now being solicited for individual paper presentations, panel discussions, and complete sessions on all subjects related to the Mediterranean region and Mediterranean cultures around the world from all historical periods. The official languages of the Congress are English and Greek. But complete sessions in any Mediterranean language are welcome.

Following an optional walking tour of Athens, the Congress will open with a plenary session and reception on the evening of Wednesday, May 27. Over the next three days, 150-200 scholarly papers will be delivered before an international audience of scholars, academics, and experts in a wide range of fields. A number of special events are being planned for Congress participants that will highlight the unique cultural aspects of Athens.

Sponsors of the congress include the Mediterranean Studies Association, the University of Athens, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, University of Kansas, Utah State University, and the Institute for Mediterranean Studies, Busan University of Foreign Studies, Korea.

Guidelines for Submission of Proposals

1. You may submit a proposal for an individual paper presentation, a complete session, or a round table panel on any Mediterranean topic and theme. The typical session will include 3 or 4 papers, each lasting twenty minutes, a chair, and (optionally) a commentator. (For examples of paper, roundtable panels, and session topics, and the range of subjects, see the programs from previous congresses.)

2. Submit a 150-word abstract in English for each paper, and a one-page CV for each participant, including chairs and commentators, as well as each participant’s name, email, regular address, and phone number. Proposals for complete sessions or roundtables need to include the chair’s name. Only ONE paper proposal per person will be accepted.

3. Deadline: The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2015. We will, however, continue to accept late submissions on a case by case basis after this deadline.

4. If you are giving your paper in a language other than English, please let us know and give us the title of your paper in that language as well as in English.

5. The MSA does not allow papers to be read in absentia.

6. Proposals for papers and/or sessions must be submitted through the MSA website: https://www.mediterraneanstudies.org/

Membership and Congress Registration: All accepted participants must be 2015 members of the MSA as well as register for the Congress no later than February 1, 2015. Late registrations will be available until March 31, 2015. Please be advised that those who have not registered by April 1, 2015, will be removed from the program.

Publications: After the congress, you are encouraged to submit your revised, expanded paper for consideration for publication in the Association’s double-blind, peer-reviewed journal, Mediterranean Studies, published by Penn State University Press.

If you have questions, please contact Ben and Louise Taggie at medstudiesassn@umassd.edu, and Geraldo Sousa at Sousa@ku.edu

Conference: The Mediterranean City and Its Rulers, Princeton

Shawcross-Conf-Posters-FINALThe Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies presents “The Mediterranean City and Its Rulers: A Comparison of Byzantium, Islam, and Western Christendom in the High Middle Ages,” a conference, directed by Teresa Shawcross, Assistant Professor of History, to held on 2627 April at 216 Aaron Burr Hall.

The High Middle Ages were a period of profound transformation for the Christian cities of the central and western Mediterranean. However, it has generally been thought that the urban centers of the Islamic and Byzantine worlds to the south and east did not share in the same economic, political, and cultural developments. Most interregional studies carried out so far have promoted this understanding of the period by considering the “classic example” of the cities of northern Italy solely in the context of the situation on the other side of the Alps. Otherwise, attention has tended to be focused on specific polities within each of the three Mediterranean macro-regions, to the neglect of the picture across macro-regions. There has been no in-depth comparison of how cities were ruled in the various lands encircling the Great Sea, despite the existence of a strong common Roman heritage, as well as evidence for extensive interaction through long-distance trade, pilgrimage, diplomacy, and warfare. This conference will begin to undertake such an analysis, highlighting similarities and differences in governmental institutions, civic identity, and revolutionary activity throughout the Mediterranean.  The event is intended as a pilot establishing a network of scholars. The next meeting will be held at the University of Edinburgh in 2015 and is being organized by Dr. Gianluca Raccagni, Chancellor’s Fellow in History.

http://www.princeton.edu/piirs/research/piirs-conferences-and-wor/mediterraneanconf/

 

Call for papers: Mediterranean Visions/ Mediterranean Frame

MediterraneanOn 13-15 June 2014, the Sant’Anna Institute in Sorrento will host two events: a conference “Mediterranean Visions: Journeys, Itineraries and Cultural Migrations/ Visioni Mediterranee: Viaggi, Itinerari e Migrazioni Culturali” and a symposium, “History, Literature and Culture in a Mediterranean Frame.”

Paper proposals are being accepted for “Mediterranean Visions” (13 & 14 June), organized by Giovanni Spani (College of Holy Cross) and Marco Marino (Sant’Anna Institute). This conference will focus on the perceptions of the journey to/from/around the Mediterranean Sea, moving from Italian, European and extra-European perspectives (and with specific reference to the Americas), and concentrating on the theme of immigration/emigration to/from the Mediterranean Basin), the intercultural exchanges occurring between its shores, as well as new challenges (social and economic) facing the region from the globalized society and from the increasingly urgent democratic imperatives of the populations inhabiting it.

Selected conference papers will published in a volume of proceedings.

In conjunction with the conference, the symposium, “History, Literature and Culture in a Mediterranean Frame,” co-organized by Wake Forest University and the Mediterranean Seminar with the sponsorship of Centro di Cultura e Storia Amalfitana, will be held on 15 June, and is open to all.
Confirmed speakers include:
Brian A. Catlos (University of Colorado Boulder/University of California Santa Cruz)
John Dagenais (University of California at Los Angeles)
Sharon Kinoshita (University of California Santa Cruz)
Roberta Morosini (Wake Forest University)
Pasquale Sabbatino (Universita’ degli studi “Federico II’ di  Napoli)
Carlo Saccone (Universita’ di Bologna)
Roberto Tottoli   (Universita’ degli studi di Napoli  “L’Orientale”)
and
Prof. Giuseppe Gargano (Honorary President, Centro di Cultura e Storia Amalfitana)

For information regarding the symposium, please contact: mailbox@mediterraneanseminar.org

Conference Proposals
Please send your proposal (2 paragraph maximum) in Italian, English, Spanish, or French, along with a brief CV, to the conference Organizing Committee at mediterraneanvisions@gmail.com by April 10, 2014.

Please visit http://santannainstitute.com/en/conference-at-sant-anna-institute.php for more details and the list of topics.