Author Archives: tomnickson2013

Society for Court Studies research and publication bursaries, deadline 15 March

Munich crownThe Society for Court Studies is launching biannual research and publication bursaries worth £250 each. The bursaries are available to all postgraduate and early career (within six years of PhD award) researchers working in the field of court studies. The deadline for applying is Friday 15 March. To apply for an award please send a statement of up to 250 words outlining your research, and the use to which you would put the award, to Joanna Tinworth (jtinworth@soane.org.uk). For more information, please click here.

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Still open! Vacancy, Assistant Professor of the History of European Architecture, ca. 500-1500, at Columbia University, NYC

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Columbia is still accepting applications for the following position:

Job Requisition Number 0000210
Field(s) of Specialization History of European Architecture, ca. 500-1500
Position Title Assistant Professor
Department A&S Art History & Archaeology
Location Morningside
Summary Description Department of Art History and Archaeology, Assistant Professor, tenure-track, History of European Architecture, ca. 500-1500.

We seek a colleague whose research focuses on any aspect of medieval architecture from late antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages and whose interests connect to other subfields of art and architectural history within the department and the Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation.

Teaching responsibilities include regularly covering the history of medieval architecture in Western and Central Europe, participating in a team effort to teach a survey course in the History of Architecture, teaching advanced courses in the field of specialization, and teaching regularly in Columbia’s Core Curriculum.

The department is particularly interested in candidates who, through their research, teaching, and/or service, will contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community. The PhD must be completed by the time of the appointment (July 1, 2019).

Screening will begin by January 1, 2019.

Minimum Degree Required Ph.D
Minimum Qualifications A PhD must be completed by the time of the appointment (July 1, 2019).
RAPS posting date 11/21/2018
Search Closing Date
Special Instructions to the Applicant All applications must be made through Columbia University’s online Recruitment of Academic Personnel System (RAPS). On the RAPSsite, applicants should upload the following required materials: cover letter, curriculum vitae, and one published article or article-length writing sample. Applicants should also enter the information and arrange for a minimum of three letters of reference to be sent on their behalf. RAPS will accommodate uploads of maximum two (2) megabytes in size per document.

Before uploading documents, applicants first will be asked to input a name and valid email address for each reference provider. The application to this position must include a minimum of three reference letters. The applicant may enable RAPS to generate an automatic email to the reference provider, politely requesting a letter of reference and offering a secure link to the RAPS website where a letter can be uploaded quickly and easily. Wherever possible, letters should be uploaded in the online system. If this is not possible, the applicant should refer the reference provider or dossier service to the following address:

Attn: Medieval History Search Committee
Department of Art History and Archaeology
826 Schermerhorn Hall
Mail Code 5517
Columbia University
New York, NY 10027

After completing the “Provide References” screens, the applicant will come to the “Attach Documents” screen and will be asked to upload into RAPS the required application materials listed above. The completion of the application process in RAPS is indicated by a confirmation number, which the applicant should retain.

Proposed Start Date 07/01/2019
EEO Statement Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer —Race/Gender/Disability/Veteran.
Review Begins
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Job: Cambridge University, Lecturer in Medieval Art & Architecture. Deadline 17 Jan 2019

CambridgeThe Department of History of Art wishes to appoint a University Lecturer in Medieval Art and Architecture, and invites applications from candidates with a research focus on any aspect or area of medieval art and architecture in continental Europe and/or the British Isles, c. 1050 to c. 1450. Candidates will be expected to be engaged in high-level research, to publish in their specialist field, to seek opportunities to win external funding for that research, to teach and examine undergraduates, to supervise and examine MPhil and PhD postgraduate work, and to undertake appropriate administrative roles within the Department.

Candidates must have an excellent first degree and a doctorate in History of Art or in a closely-related field. We are seeking an individual with a rising academic trajectory and a strong record of research publications commensurate with their level of experience, who has the potential to become a key player in the Department’s teaching and research activities.

The successful candidate will be expected to take up appointment on 1 September 2019.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the ‘Apply’ button below. This will route you to the University’s Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Please ensure that you upload the following:

(a) a covering letter;

(b) a Curriculum Vitae (CV), including a full list of publications;

(c) a document describing (i) your main teaching and research interests, (ii) an indication of future research plans and directions, (iii) a description of the kind of teaching you would hope to offer, including a brief curriculum for 2 sample specialist courses (max. 2 pp. to include: aims, learning outcomes, and a schedule of up to 20 lectures/classes which would deliver the course material); and, if available,

(d) one recently-published research article.

Applicants are required to give contact details for three referees who may be contacted for a reference prior to interviews (In the final field for each referee ‘At what point in the recruitment process may we contact this referee?’ applicants should therefore select ‘At any point in the process’.)

Informal enquiries are welcomed and should be directed to the Head of the Department of History of Art (Professor R. P. Blakesley: rpg27@cam.ac.uk). Enquiries about the application process may be made to the Faculty Manager’s Assistant (recruitment@aha.cam.ac.uk).

The closing date for applications is midnight (GMT) on 17 January 2019.

Interviews are expected to take place in the 1st, 2nd or 3rd week of February 2019, in Cambridge.

Please quote reference GD17501 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Further details: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/19659/ 

Medieval Touch: Handling session at the British Museum on scientific instruments in medieval and Renaissance Europe

On Weds 21st November 2018, Lloyd de Beer, Naomi Speakman, and Oliver Cooke kindly allowed students and staff from the Courtauld Institute of Art and elsewhere into the horological storerooms of the British Museum, the latest in a series of handling sessions organised by Medieval Touch. Dr Jeanne Nuechterlein of the University of York led the group in a joint examination of a series of mostly sixteenth-century scientific instruments, including replicas from her own collection.horology

We began by looking together at an astrolabe. Astrolabes were observational and calculating instruments and allowed users to tell the time through the position of the stars in relation to the astral map on the astrolabe itself, however your ability to do so was contingent upon any number of factors, not least the environmental conditions.

 

As well as explaining their purpose, Jeanne attempted to instruct us all in their use and as each of us tried and frequently failed to grasp the fundamentals of astrolabe reading, it became apparent that astrolabes are not intuitive instruments. Their use implies and demands significant technical experience and knowledge. We questioned whether this knowledge was simply more widespread in the early modern world or whether utility was not their only value. Even when we consider astrolabes purely in practical use, several limiting factors would have dictated how and by whom they were employed. Astrolabes are geographically specific instruments, each backplate designed for a set latitude – the mobile user would have required multiple plates. Moreover, larger instruments were more easily legible and produced more accurate readings.

Certain instruments that survive like this column shaped sundial were too elaborately shaped to be of any functional use. Their design seems to effect other concerns, perhaps commemorative (was this the model of a larger monumental sundial?) or aesthetic.

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However, other instruments were clearly more useable. Ivory diptych sundials like these 16th-century examples from Nuremberg, appear to have been designed for the Early Modern traveller. Handy and conveniently pocket sized, they also offered a range of adjustable settings depending on location.

 

London to Naples, Portugal to Constantinople: the lists of cities on these objects, clustering around the cities of Mitteleuropa and Northern Italy, Bremen, Königsberg, Venice and Genoa, spoke to some of us of a now lost trading geography of Europe. However, made of ivory and not unelaborately decorated, these objects were demonstrably prestige items and must have elicited viewing as much as reading.

A glance at the range of sundials in the cabinets of the horological department reveals the complex interplay of aesthetic and practical motives at work in these objects.

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Here’s what we saw, all visible on the British Museum’s website:

Sundial/horary quadrant, England 14th c., 1972,0104.1
Sundial etc., Hans Dorn 1492, 1894,0615.1
Astrolabe, Georg Hartmann 1532, 1871,1115.3
Crucifix polyhedral sundial, Georg Hartmann 1541, 1894,0722.1
Astronomical compendium/wind-vane, Christopher Schissler c. 1550, 1855,0904.1
Sundial in the form of dividers, Christopher Schissler 1558, 1888,1201.283
Universal equinoctial dial with case, Christopher Schissler c. 1570, 1922,0705.3
Regiomontanus-style sundial, Caspar Vopel 1551, 1895,0319.1
Crucifix sundial, Melchior Reichle 1569, 1874,0727.3
Standing cup in the form of a celestial globe, French, 1569, AF.3060
Pillar dial in the form of a Corinthian column, Germany, 1593, 1888,1201.282
Scaphe sundial, Germany late 16th c., 1922,0705.6
Sundial etc., Netherlands late 16th c.?, 1871,1115.5
European celestial globe from 1659, 1896,0322.1
17c armillary sphere, 1855,1201.221
Diptych dial, Hartmann, 1562, 1900,1017.1

Many thanks again to Jeanne for a fascinating session!

Call for Papers: ‘Light and darkness in pre-modern visual cultures’, Courtauld Institute of Art, London, Friday 23rd November 2018

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Courtauld Institute of Art, London
Deadline: 15 September 2018

Organisers: Stefania Gerevini and Tom Nickson

The staged lighting of modern galleries, heritage sites and publications has significantly altered understanding of the roles of light and darkness in the design and reception of pre-modern objects and spaces. Despite sophisticated systems to manage artificial and natural light, pre-modern experiences of the visual were shaped greatly by daily and seasonal rituals and contingencies. In turn, those experiences informed, and were informed by, diverse theories about vision, light and illumination.

This one-day workshop of lightning talks offers participants opportunities to explore their own encounters with issues of light and darkness in pre-modern cultures, and set them within broader scholarly frameworks. How did pre-modern cultures conceptualise, respond to, and manipulate light and darkness and their interactions in urban, domestic and religious settings? How were natural and artificial light managed? What role did they play in the design of individual artworks, architectural spaces, ephemera and rituals, and to what extent did different light levels affect perceptions of objects and spaces? What vocabulary was used to think about light and darkness, and how was this language transformed by the advent of new technologies of illumination? How did pre-modern cultures deploy light/dark, day/night, to cogitate on God and the cosmos, and to visualise them?

Lightning talks should be no more than 5 minutes and 5 slides, and will be ‘curated’ for maximum variety and visual interest. They may relate to any region or culture, and ‘pre-modern’ is here very broadly defined as the period before the adoption of gas or electric lighting. Papers might focus on single objects, rituals or spaces, or on groups thereof. All disciplinary perspectives are welcome, provided they focus predominantly on visual culture.

Papers might consider:

  • The language of light and darkness: science, theology, literature and daily life
  • Light, darkness and the senses
  • Rituals, objects and spaces by night
  • Science, technologies and visual culture
  • Theologies of light/darkness
  • Daily/annual cycles of light and dark
  • Street life and the experience of urban spaces and architectures by day and night
  • Natural ‘spotlights’ on objects or buildings
  • Provision for lighting of various kinds
  • The agency of patrons or creators in shaping lighting conditions
  • Reconstructions of original lighting conditions
  • Restaging of medieval objects in early modern contexts
  • Deliberate darkness or blinding light
  • Refraction and reflection
  • Materiality and immateriality

Abstracts of 200 words should be sent to lightanddarkness2311@gmail.com together with 100-word participant biographies. The deadline is Saturday 15th September 2018. Please note that given the brevity of papers and large number of participants, The Courtauld cannot cover travel or accommodation costs (though lunch, refreshments and a subsidised supper will be provided).

Organised by:

Stefania Gerevini (Bocconi University, Milan)

Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art, London)

Job: Lecturer in Medieval Art and Architecture, History of Art, University of York (UK), deadline 23rd July 2018

Department: History of Art
Based at University of York – Heslington Campus
Hours of work: Full-time
Contract status:  Open
Salary £38,832 – £41,212 a year
Apply by 23/07/2018

The Department of History of Art at York is one of the largest and most dynamic communities of art historians in the UK with an international reputation for research and teaching over a chronological span from late antiquity to the present. Particular strengths include Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art, Sculpture, and Stained Glass. We now wish to appoint a Lecturer in Medieval Art and Architecture, and invite applications from those working on Europe (East or West), or the Byzantine, Islamic, Judaic, or Russian worlds.

You will have a strong research profile in this area, complementing existing areas of staff expertise and bringing new perspectives to the Department’s medieval coverage. You will contribute to the department’s profile through high-quality publications, by seeking external research funding, and by demonstrating the impact of your research. You will develop and maintain relationships with museums, galleries, and other organisations involved in medieval art and architecture at local, regional, national, and international levels. You will contribute to the department’s teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, including specialist, research-led teaching and supervision of MA and PhD students. You will undertake an appropriate share of administrative responsibilities.

You will have a PhD in History of Art or relevant area, and appropriate academic professional and teaching qualifications or a willingness to complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice.

You will have knowledge of a range of research techniques and methodologies and a range of teaching techniques to enthuse and engage students. You will possess advanced and relevant IT knowledge and research expertise in an area that will complement and enhance the department’s research strategy and goals.

You will be expected to demonstrate your ability to contribute to high quality research which has been publicly evidenced, for example, by the presentation of papers at conferences and workshops; participation in public engagement events to disseminate research; the publishing of chapters in text books; the publishing of papers; articles or reviews in academic journals or elsewhere. You will be expected to show evidence of successful course planning, design and delivery across a range of modules, with exemplification of teaching materials.

You will have the ability to develop research objectives, projects and proposals, highly developed oral and written communication skills, including the ability to write and/or contribute to publications and/or to disseminate research findings using other appropriate media; to deliver presentations at conferences or exhibit work at other appropriate events internally and externally; to extend, transform, and apply knowledge from scholarship; to design teaching material and deliver either across a range of modules or within a subject area; and to supervise the work of others, for example in research teams or projects or as an MA, PhD or postdoctoral supervisor.

Enquiries to Professor Michael White (michael.white@york.ac.uk), telephone 01904 322978.

Interviews will be held on 14 September 2018 and the expected start date is 1 January 2019. The post is full time and permanent (salary range £38,832 – £41,212 a year).