Author Archives: tomnickson2013

Lecture: The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, “very much like the residence of the Muslim kings”?’ SOAS, 7pm, 11 October 2017

ISLAMIC ART CIRCLE at SOAS
Monthly Lecture

A 207
The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings’?
Dr Tom Nickson
Wednesday, 11 October 2017
7.00 p.m., Khalili Lecture Theatre, Main Building, SOAS
Chaired by Professor Hugh Kennedy
Enquiries: rosalindhaddon@gmail.com

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The Fritz Saxl Doctoral Studentship at the Warburg. Deadline 23 June 2017

WarburgThe Warburg Institute invites enquiries and applications for the award of the Fritz Saxl Doctoral Studentship for the period from October 2017 to September 2020.

Applications are welcome from candidates of any nationality. Applicants should possess, or be about to receive, an MA degree or equivalent. The Fritz Saxl Studentship will be awarded on the basis of outstanding academic performance, the quality of the research proposal and promise of scholarly excellence.

The Fritz Saxl Studentship has been established to support an outstanding PhD applicant who wishes to conduct their research at the Warburg Institute and has applied to register for a PhD at the Institute.  The successful applicant will have an outstanding research proposal and a genuine and demonstrable interest in being supervised by a member of the Warburg Institute faculty.  The award will be made for entry in Autumn 2017 and will include:

  • The full payment of tuition fees at Home/EU levels (worth up to £6,240 per year at 2017/18 rates) for three years.
  • A maintenance stipend worth £16,000 at 2017/18 rates for a period of three years.

The Warburg Institute is the premier institute in the world for the study of cultural history and the role of images in culture. It is cross-disciplinary and global. It is concerned with the histories of art and science, and their relationship with superstition, magic and popular beliefs. Its researches are historical, philological and anthropological. It is dedicated to the study of the survival and transmission of cultural forms – whether in literature, art, music or science – across borders and from the earliest times to the present. In setting out the historical, psychological, anthropological and political dimensions of art and culture, the work of Aby Warburg underlines the continuing relevance of the humanities today.

Studying at the Warburg Institute provides access to scholars and Fellows of the highest calibre in professional and research terms. Contact hours and consultation with academic staff is one of the most favourable to be found in any academic institution. There is also the advantage of access to the Warburg Library, one of the world’s finest, as well as the Photographic Collection and Warburg Institute Archive. Lectures are friendly and intimate, and there is a constant flow of academics of international standing through our doors, as well as regular scholarly conferences, seminars and events which attract the larger academic community.

The Warburg Institute offers doctoral research supervision in the following broad areas:

  • Art History, visual and material culture
  • Cultural and Intellectual History
  • Humanism and the history of scholarship
  • Renaissance philosophy and the history and transmission of ideas
  • History of Science
  • History of the Book
  • Arabic and Islamic influences in Europe
  • Folk Practice

Further information about the Institute, staff and research interests and current PhD topics can be found at http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/

Eligibility

Applicants for the Fritz Saxl Doctoral Studentship must have submitted an application for registration as a PhD student at the Warburg Institute to commence in October 2017.  The Fritz Saxl Doctoral Studentship is only open to new applicants for a PhD and not for continuing PhD students.

 

How to apply

There is no application form. Applications should be made by signed and dated letter addressed to Ms C E Charlton, Associate Director (Administration), The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB.  Your letter of application should contain a clear and comprehensive statement setting out your reasons for applying for the Studentship and a copy of your research proposal should be supplied with the letter. You should also indicate clearly in your on line PhD application form that it is your intention to apply for the Fritz Saxl Studentship.

Candidates must submit their application for the award of a Fritz Saxl Studentship at the same time as they submit their application for registration as a PhD student at the Warburg Institute.  Applications must be submitted by no later than 23 June 2017.logo

Vacancy: Lecturer in Art History (pre 1750), University of St Andrews

St AndrewsLecturer in Art History – AC2042AC

University of St Andrews – School of Art History

Start Date: As soon as possible

We wish to appoint a Lecturer (Pre 1750) within the School of Art History. You will be a scholar with a growing international research reputation in art or architectural history or a related field and a commitment to delivering high quality teaching within the field of art history (broadly defined). The successful candidates will be expected to have a range of interests, to be active in research publication that strengthens or complements those in the School and to be capable of teaching the subject to undergraduate and taught postgraduate students from a wide range of backgrounds.

Candidates should hold a PhD in a cognate discipline. Excellent teaching skills and an interest in promoting knowledge exchange are essential. You should also have some familiarity with grant seeking processes in relation to research councils and other sources.

Informal enquiries can be directed to the Head of the School of Art History, Dr Julian Luxford (jml5@st-andrews.ac.uk)

The University of St Andrews is committed to promoting equality of opportunity for all, which is further demonstrated through its working on the Gender and Race Equality Charters and being awarded the Athena SWAN award for women in science, HR Excellence in Research Award and the LGBT Charter; http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/hr/edi/diversityawards/.

We encourage applicants to apply online at www.vacancies.st-andrews.ac.uk/welcome.aspx, however if you are unable to do this, please call +44 (0)1334 462571 for an application pack.

Closing Date: 24 April 2017

Please quote ref: AC2042AC

Further Particulars: AC2042AC FPs.doc

Apply: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AYE601/lecturer-in-art-history-ac2042ac/

Vacancy: Lecturer in Museum and Gallery Studies, University of St Andrews

St AndrewsLecturer in Art History – AC2041AC

University of St Andrews – School of Art History

Start: As soon as possible.

We wish to appoint a Lecturer in Museum and Gallery Studies within the School of Art History. You will be a scholar with a growing international research reputation in museology or a related field and a commitment to delivering high quality teaching within the broad field of museum and gallery studies. The successful candidate will be expected to have a range of interests, to be active in research publication that strengthens or complements those in the School and to be capable of teaching the subject to taught postgraduate students from a wide range of backgrounds.

Candidates should hold a PhD in a cognate discipline. Excellent teaching skills and an interest in promoting knowledge exchange are essential. You should also have some familiarity with grant seeking processes in relation to research councils and other sources.

Informal enquiries can be directed to the Head of the School of Art history, Dr Julian Luxford (jml5@st-andrews.ac.uk)

The University of St Andrews is committed to promoting equality of opportunity for all, which is further demonstrated through its working on the Gender and Race Equality Charters and being awarded the Athena SWAN award for women in science, HR Excellence in Research Award and the LGBT Charter;  http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/hr/edi/diversityawards/.

Closing Date: 24 April 2017

Please quote ref: AC2041AC

Further Particulars: AC2041AC FPs.doc

Apply: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AYD787/lecturer-in-art-history-ac2041ac/

Job (permanent): Properties Historian at English Heritage, deadline 15 April 2017

EHEnglish Heritage is looking for a Properties Historian for a permanent post based in London. Salary c. £30,000. They’re especially keen to find a specialist on castles, or a medievalist. Deadline 15 April 2017. Further details here

 

 

(From the EH site) We are looking for a historian, archaeologist or architectural historian to carry out research into our 420 historic monuments, buildings and sites. You will be part of a small team of historians working collaboratively with colleagues from across English Heritage to deliver innovative and engaging interpretation schemes for visitors to our sites.

Under the direction of a Senior Properties Historian you will be responsible for undertaking and managing research into our sites, and for the dissemination of this research to a wide audience. Working on projects with Curatorial Department colleagues, you will formulate and implement research programmes, providing content and supporting materials for high-quality new presentation schemes. You will also make research publicly available through publication in a variety of media including guidebooks, scholarly journals, the English Heritage website and Members’ Magazine.

We are looking for someone who can work independently, often to very tight deadlines, engaging constructively with a wide range of stakeholders, including curators, interpreters, visitor operations staff and external specialists. You will need to be confident in documentary and archaeological research, and able to synthesise material of different types, ranging from oral history to web-based sources. Your work will include sites from all periods in England’s history, though a specialism in the study of castles and their landscapes and/or post-medieval fortifications would be a distinct advantage.

We bring the story of England to life for over 10 million visitors each year. No matter what they do and where they do it, our people play their part in protecting and presenting some of the greatest places in England for the benefit and enjoyment of our visitors.

We offer a wide benefits package to our employees including a competitive pension scheme, 25 days holiday and free entry into English Heritage sites.

Closing date: 15/04/2017 23:59:59

Early Career Lectureship in Medieval Art at The Courtauld, 3 years, from September 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to appoint an Early Career Lecturer in Medieval Art (fixed-term; 3 years from 1 September 2017) to support and deliver teaching in the Department of Art History.

Salary: £35,798 pa (Inc. London Allowance)

courtauld-exterior_new_small-jpg-500x240

 

The Courtauld Institute of Art is the UK’s leading institution for teaching and research in Art History and the conservation of paintings; it is also home to one of the finest small art museums in the world.

Closing date: Monday 13 March 2017

Further details: https://jobs.courtauld.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=121

Locating Becket

How can the life and cult of Thomas Becket be traced through material culture? This was the question at the heart of the ‘Locating Becket’ workshop, sponsored by CHASE, and held at the British Library, British Museum and Courtauld Institute of Art on Tuesday 6th December 2016. Curators and scholars gathered first at the British Library to examine a number of manuscripts connected to Becket’s life and cult, including Cotton Claudius B II, with the earliest representation of Becket’s martyrdom (below). This fairly stable iconography  could be followed in later manuscripts, including the (very bloody) Huth Psalter (Add MS 38116 ), a 15th-century Book of Hours from Rouen (Harley 1251), and in two seals attached to Ch. 17353 and Harley Ch. 44 C 33.

martyrdom-thomas-becket-a80136-48

Becket’s martyrdom, from Alan of Tewkesbury’s letters, British Library Cotton MS Claudius B II, late 12th century. Image in the public domain.

An early collection of Becket’s miracles was also examined (Egerton MS 2818), as well as the early fourteenth-century ‘memorandum book’  of Prior Henry Eastry (Cotton Galba E. iv), which includes an inventory of Prior Eastry’s interventions, an extensive inventory of the sacristy, and an inventory of the library. Finally, we looked at the early fifteenth-century customary of Becket’s shrine (Additional 59616), with extensive instructions  for the celebration of his feast days, which is bound together with two copies of his lives which seem to have been kept at the shrine and read to pilgrims.

The afternoon was spent looking at the British Museum’s extraordinary collection of pilgrims’ badges, ampullae, reliquaries and other objects related to Becket, including the impression of the 15th-century seal of the Mercers Company (below), which shows Becket on a ship, returning from exile.

becket

Impression of a Mercers’ company seal matrix, after 1462

 

Below is a full list of the objects consulted at the British Museum:

Badges
1836,0610.32, ca. 1320-1450, Becket bust, purchased from Cureton.

1855,0804.70, ca. 1250-1350, Becket contained within a T, found Thames 1845, previous owner Chaffers, then Cureton.

1855,0724.5, head of Becket between two raised swords contained within an octofoil frame, ca. 1320-1450. Purchased from William Edwards.

1856,0701.2036, ca. 1300-1350, bust of Becket between a nine point star, inscription SANCTVS.THOMAS, found 22nd August 1850, purchased Charles Roach Smith.

1856,0701.2031 and 2032, two badges in the form of Becket’s bust, ca. 1320-1450, purchased Charles Roach Smith.

1856,0701.2039, ca. 1350-1400, four embossed fleur-de-lis in the form of a quatrefoil around a central boss, inscription SANTE.THOMA.OR.P.M., purchased Charles Roach Smith, previous collection Edward Wigan.

1868,0904.39, badge in the form of a kind of ship known as a cog, ca.1350-1400, donated by Franks.

2001,0702.1, Becket’s bust reliquary, ca. 1320-1375, found Billingsgate.

OA.1817, decorative sword sheath (referring to the relic of the sword tip) with Fitz Urse coat of arms, ca. 1350-1450.

2001,0702.2, Becket riding  a peacock, ca. 1250-1350, found Thames Exchange.

dec-2016-bm-handling-session

Ampullae

1891,0418.21, ampulla with circular openwork tracery. The obverse of the ampulla is embossed with the standing figure of St Thomas Becket in a bishop’s mitre and chasuble, with an equal-armed cross standing out from his breast. The reverse bears a representation of his martyrdom with Becket kneeling in the centre, inscription OPTIMUS EGRORVM.MEDICVS.FIT.THOMA.BONORVM, ‘May Thomas be the best doctor of the worthy sick’, ca. 1220-1420.

1896,0501.69, the front of the ampulla  depicts the standing figure of St Thomas Becket in mitre and chasuble,  making a gesture of benediction and holding a crosier. The reverse shows the  scene of his martyrdom with one knight faced by a kneeling Becket. The  frame is filled with openwork decoration of symmetrical sexfoil and fleur-de- lis motifs and a representation of the front- and back-view of a seated  Becket, depicted in episcopal garb, enclosed within a roundel. Inscription, REGENAKDVS.FILIVS HVRS:THOMAS:MARTIRIVM:FECE:FR., ‘Reginald Fitz Urse brought to pass the Martyrdom of Thomas’, donated by Franks.

2001,0702.3, chasse shaped ampulla, ca. 1250-1350, found Billingsgate.

2001,0702.6, ship-shaped ampulla (referring to Becket’s return from exile) with a high relief representation of Becket, ?ca. 1170-1250, found Billingsgate.

 

Seals

1880,0624.1, impression of Mercer’s company seal matrix, showing a  half-figure of St Thomas of Canterbury in a ship, inscriptions, ‘sigillu : anglicor in flandria : brabancia : hollandria: zeeladia : m’cat’ and ‘s. thomas catuar’, after 1462, found Harrow.

1913,1105.3, Langdon Priory seal matrices. On the obverse is a Virgin and Child seated in a canopied niche on a corbel. On the reverse is a scene of the  Martyrdom of St Thomas in Canterbury Cathedral. 13th century. Inscriptions, ‘SIGILL’ . COMMVNE MONASTERII: ECCE: DE MARIE: DE: LANGEDON’ and ‘CAVSA: DOMVS: XPI: MORTEM: SIC: IRTVLIT ISTI’.

1981,1103.1, Seal-matrix: Warden of Greyfriars at Canterbury. Inscription, ‘SIG GARDIANI FRUM MINORU CANTUARIE’. Ca. 1330-1350.

casket-interior

Reliquaries and other objects

AF.2765, Reliquary pendant showing on the observes John the Baptist and possibly Thomas Becket on the reverse. Inscription, ‘A MON + dERREYNE’. Late 15th century, found Devizes.

1878,1101.3, Chasse depicting the martyrdom of Becket, ca. 1210, donated by Meyrick, previous collection Douce.

1852,0327.1, Henry of Blois plaques, made possibly in England, ca. 1150-1171. Inscriptions:
+ MVNERA GRATA DEO PREMISSVS VERNA FIGVRAT. ANGELVS AD  CELVM RAPIAT POST DONA DATOREM;. NE TAMEN ACCELERET NE  SVSCITET ANGLIA LVCTVS, CVI PXA VEL BELLVM MOTVSVE  QVIESVE PER ILLUM (= ‘The aforementioned slave shapes gifts pleasing to God.  May the angel take  the giver to Heaven after his gifts, but not just yet, lest England groan for it,  since on him it depends for peace or war, agitation or rest.’) + ARS AVRO GEMMISQ (UE) PRIOR, PRIOR OMNIBVS AVTOR.  DONA  DAT HENRICVS VIVVS IN ERE DEO, MENTE PAREM MVSIS (ET)  MARCO VOCE PRIOREM.  FAME VIRIS, MORES CONCILIANT  SUPERIS.  Also inscribed within the scene, HENRICUS EPISCOP  (‘Art comes before gold and gems, the author before everything.  Henry, alive in bronze, gives gifts to God.  Henry, whose fame commends him to  men, whose character commends him to the heavens, a man equal in mind to  the Muses and in eloquence higher than Marcus [that is, Cicero].’)

1854,0411.2, enamelled casket depicting the murder of Becket, 13th century, purchased from William Forrest.

1890,0809.1, alabaster panel showing the murder of Thomas Becket,

 

Prints and Drawings

1973,0512.3.2, Ecclesiae Anglicanae Trophaea, Plate 2: the Trinity surrounded by angels in the upper section; two bishops in  brocaded cloaks in the lower section, after Niccolò Circignani, etching.

1973,0512.3.25, Ecclesiae Anglicanae Trophaea, Plate 25: the martyrdom of St Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, the saint  kneeling before the altar, about to be martyred by a group of soldiers with  swords; scene separated from the background by a balustrade with balusters;  St Thomas named archbishop by Henry II at far left; saint kneeling before  Pope Alexander III seated on a throne, accompanied by two male attendants  at far right, etching.

illustration-to-bowyers-edition-of-humes-history-of-england-1793

Illustration to Bowyer’s edition of Hume’s History of England, 1793

1853,1210.383, Illustration to Bowyer’s edition of Hume’s History of England; the  assassination of Thomas Becket, wrestled to his knees by a gang of four  knights, one raising a bludgeon above him, his mitre and staff fallen at left.   1793, etching and engraving.

1856,0607.15, Portrait of Thomas Becket, head and shoulders to left, with hands joined in  prayer, wearing ecclesiastical robes, a sword wedged in his skull.  1647, etching.

The day concluded with a lecture at The Courtauld by Cynthia Hahn, ‘Like life-giving seeds: The Multiplication and Dissemination of Relics and Reliquaries‘.

This event was made possible through a CHASE Network Development Grant, with additional support from the University of Kent and The Courtauld.