Tag Archives: Trade

Conference: Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean, UNED, Madrid, October 26, 2018

Image result for portolano mediterraneoINTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean: sociability networks and artistic creation in the Late Medieval and Early Modern periods
UNED, Madrid 26 de octubre de 2018.

9.30. Presentación
SESIÓN 1: Alteridades móviles: La visión del otro en la literatura y el arte
Modera: Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza (UCM)
10:00-10:20: Representando al otro: tejidos y vestidos en los espacios de sociabilidad en el siglo XV castellano. Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
10:20-10:40: The Fifth Column: rethinking the Morisco’s visual representation. Borja Franco Llopis (UNED).
10:40-11:00: La visión del cristiano como “otro”. Alteridad en el Mediterráneo Otomano. Miguel Ángel de Bunes Ibarra (CSIC).
11:00-11:30: DEBATE
11:30-12:00: PAUSA-CAFÉ

Sesión 2: Redes de saber, redes de poder: Objetos y conocimientos en circulación
Modera: Consuelo Gómez López (UNED)
12:00-12:20: Movilidad, circulación, interacción. La formación de un grupo de presión belicista en la monarquía policéntrica de los Habsburgo (Génova, Madrid, País Vasco – siglo XVI) Bastien Carpentier (Université Littoral Côte d’Opale)
12:20-12:40: No solo inventarios. Bibliotecas en movimiento en el Mediterráneo. Margarita Vázquez Manassero (UNED)
12:40-13:00: Un mar en papeles para los ojos de Felipe II: la ciencia y el dibujo del ingeniero. Alicia Cámara Muñoz (UNED)
13:00-13:30: DEBATE
13:30-15:30: COMIDA

Sesión 3: El Mediterráneo: espacio de conflicto, espacio de intercambio.
Modera: Fernando Rodríguez Mediano (CSIC-CORPI)
15.30-15:50: Los espías del rey. La inteligencia hispano-imperial contra el turco (siglo XVI) Gennaro Varriale (Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”)
15:50-16:10 Caravaggio in Malta and his connection to the Ottoman Art. Filiz Çakir Phillip (Aga Khan Museum Toronto).
16:10-16:30: Between objects and subjects: slaves and religious artifacts in the 17th Mediterranean. Daniel Hershenzon (University of Connecticut)
16:30-17:00 DEBATE
17:00-17:30: PAUSA CAFÉ

Sesión 4: Un Mediterráneo global. Dinámicas transoceánicas  del siglo XVI
Modera: Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
17:30-17:50 Lepanto in the Americas: Global Storytelling and Mediterranean History. Stefan Hanß (University of Manchester)
17:50-18:10: American objects at the beginning of the sixteenth century Antonio Urquízar Herrera (UNED).
18:10-18:30: DEBATE

18.30 CONCLUSIONES Y CLAUSURA

Evento patrocinado por la Facultad de Geografía e Historia y el Departamento de Historia del Arte de la UNED y organizado dentro del proyecto: HAR2016-80354-P. IMPI. Antes del orientalismo: Las “imágenes” del musulmán en la Península Ibérica (siglos XV-XVII) y sus conexiones mediterráneas (Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología y Universidades- Fondos FEDER).
Actividad del Grupo de Investigación: Arte y Pensamiento en la Edad Moderna y Contemporánea

Dirección científica: Elena Paulino Montero
Coordinación científica: Borja Franco Llopis

Click here for more information

Advertisements

CFP: ICMA sponsored session: ‘MOVING MATERIALS: Medium, Meanings, and Technique in Transit,’ Leeds International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 1–4 July 2019

1024px-vase_de_cristal_d27alic3a9norDeadline: 21 September 2018

MOVING MATERIALS: Medium, Meanings, and Technique in Transit, Leeds International Medieval Congress (thematic strand: Materialities), University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 1-4 July 2019

Sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) Student Committee
Organized by D. Esther Kim (Toronto),  Maggie Crosland (Courtauld), and Xin Yue (Sylvia) Wang (Toronto)

The materials of the medieval artist, artisan, and architect were constantly on the move, travelling from one part of the globe to another through trade, gifting, looting, or theft. Likewise, the localized techniques of working with materials and media could travel near and far, through the movement of artists and objects, as well as written and visual descriptions such as artist manuals and travel guides.

While on the move, travelling materials such as stone and marble, metals, fur, textiles, coral, ivory, and pigment—and techniques of working with these materials—might retain their original meanings and function; or they could be integrated with local media, refined, or even significantly transformed to something drastically different, to suit the ideologies and ambitions of their destination.

This panel aims to engage with materials and techniques in transit, as well as the (trans)regionality of their meanings and significations, by asking: are we still able to trace the ‘origin’ and ‘originality’ of certain materials, techniques, and their meanings? How then would the fluidity and transformation of techniques affect our understanding when we are trying to ascribe a certain technique to a particular culture or region? How are old, new, and combined meanings assessed and understood in the Middle Ages and in scholarship today?

Possible topics of discussion include, but are not limited to: global movements and dissemination of artists and/or their materials and techniques; modes of transmission; regional/transregional meaning and significance of materials and techniques; reuse and repurposing of existing materials and/or artworks; reasons for shifts in meaning and function of materials within and outside particular regions; the integration of materials and medium, and intermediality; trans-temporal/ trans-regional use of spolia, among others.

How to apply: We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from graduate student ICMA members, and encourage interdisciplinary submissions from students researching all parts of the globe from c.400-c.1500. To propose a paper, please send a title, abstract of up to 250 words, and CV to the organizers (de.kim@mail.utoronto.ca, margaret.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk, xw388@nyu.edu) by 21 September, 2018.

The International Center for Medieval Art Student Committee involves and advocates for all members of the ICMA with student status and facilitates communication and mentorship between student and non-student members.

Call for Contributions: English Alabaster Sculptures in Context: Art, History and Historiography (edited volume)

english_-_resurrection_-_walters_27308The book aims at challenging the current limits within the field of research related to English alabasters, in order to establish a new model of study. Over the last century many studies on English alabasters have been published, including exhibition catalogues, list of documents and archival sources, catalogues raisonnés of the most important collections. All these studies have marked key points in the scholarly approach to English alabaster carvings, but they have also imposed a stubbornly curt historiographical perspective. Indeed, these publications have mainly been focused on specific collections -e.g. Frances Cheetham’s Medieval English alabaster carvings in the Castle Museum of Nottingham (Nottingham, 1973)-, and have thus provided only a partial view on that artistic phenomenon. They ended up isolating English alabasters from their historical and cultural context. In addition, as Susan Ward has pointed out in her review to Frances Cheetham’s Alabaster Images of Medieval England (Speculum, 2006), these publications’ main focus was often traditional: their bulks describe the standard subject matters found in the alabasters (e.g. the Passion of Christ, the Life of the Virgin and the saints) and explain the literary sources of that subject matter in a sometime too basic way. The authors tend to isolate the pieces from their wider historical framework, lacking to consider the character of piety in late-medieval England, and failing to consider the sculptures from a comprehensive historiographical point of view.

The book aims at setting the study of English alabasters on a new footing, which results from the influence of previous scholarship but, at the same time, reacts against it and is finally capable to establish a different approach.

Possible themes and subjects could address, but are not limited to one of the following topics

  • Alabaster altarpieces: function and design
  • Alabasters in pre/post Reformation England
  • Centres of productions, Trade routes
  • Workshop practices (Collaborations and Co-creations; Process and Method; Marks and Inscriptions; Archival records)
  • Reception of alabasters abroad; Possible adaption to local practices/taste
  • Patronage
  • Paraliturgical Dramas
  • Distinctions between rural/urban churches
  • Alabaster tombs

Papers will be collected in a volume to be published by the end of next year (2018), entitled English Alabaster Sculptures in Context: Art, History and Historiography. Submission: Please send an abstract of your proposed contribution (ca. 300 words) and a short CV to the editor: zuleika.murat@unipd.it.

Deadline: April 1, 2017.

Typical Venice? Venetian Commodities, 13th-16th centuries (3-6 March 2016)

095L12230_6GNHR_1[1]Call for Papers

Deutsches Studienzentrum in Venice, Palazzo Barbarigo della Terrazza,
March 3 – 06, 2016
Deadline: Oct 31, 2015

Organizer: Dr. Philippe Cordez (ENB-Nachwuchsforschergruppe “Premodern
Objects”, Department Kunstwissenschaften, LMU Munich) and PD Dr.
Romedio Schmitz-Esser (Deutsches Studienzentrum in Venice)

What are “Venetian” commodities? More than any other medieval or early
modern city, Venice lived off of the trade of portable goods. In
addition to trading foreign imports, the city also engaged in intense
local production, manufacturing high quality glass, crystal, cloth,
metal, enamel, leather, and ceramic objects, characterized by their
exceedingly rich forms and complex production processes. Today, these
objects are scattered in collections throughout the world, but little
remains in Venice itself. In individual instances, it is often
difficult to tell whether the objects in question were actually made in
Venice or if they originated in Byzantine, Islamic, or other European
contexts.

This conference focuses on the question of how Venice designed and
exported its own identity through all kinds of its goods, long before
ideas about the city were propagated by, shaped through and crystalized
in images (the countless, largely standardized vedute). We especially
invite papers that address the following questions:
What was the relationship between raw commodities like wood, stone,
wool or foodstuffs, which varied in their degrees of value, and
specifically artistic products? Where do luxury goods that were
processed in Venice, such as medicines, spices, or pigments, fit into
the picture? What was the relationship between portable objects that
could be acquired and the city’s other, inalienable riches, such as
architecture and church treasures?
How could Venetian merchants, craftsmen, or artists generate a specific
set of expectations with respect to their wares and what kinds of
organizational and aesthetic strategies were used to meet these
expectations? What role did the Senate play, for instance, by imposing
import bans? What did travelers expect from Venice and what did they
find? Where and how were commodities from Venice received elsewhere?
What was perceived to be and labeled as “Venetian,” from medieval
“Orientalism” in the city to the “façon de Venise” in the whole of
Europe? Finally, can Venetian “commodity” concepts be reconstructed and
to what extent can similarities and differences be identified between
Venice and the commodity cultures of other cities in the Mediterranean
and in Europe?

Expected contributions could address “Venetian” commodity categories
and object groups individually or in relation to each other or in
relation to larger, overarching issues. Papers written from the
perspectives of the history of art, economy, law, literature or other
historical sciences are welcome.
Travel and accommodation costs will be defrayed. Speakers will be
invited to participate in an anthology on the same subject following
the conference. The working languages are mainly English and Italian,
but papers in German and French will also be considered.

Please send an abstract (one page) and a short CV to
Philippe.Cordez@kunstgeschichte.uni-muenchen.de.

The deadline for abstract submissions is 31.10.2015.

CFP: Movement in Medieval Art and Architecture (London, 7 February 2015)

Call for Papers:
Movement in Medieval Art and Architecture
20th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium 
London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 7 February 2015

imagePilgrimage, wars and trade are key components of the Middle Ages and all embody movement. This colloquium aims at exploring the importance of movement in the creative processes of medieval art and architecture. Participants are invited to interpret the notion of movement especially in relation to itinerant artists and workshops, the circulation of artworks and the transmission of ideas. Movement will be questioned as a transformative and creative agent in art, in theory as well as in practice. This theme can be expanded to include both local and trans-cultural outcomes of exchanges, ranging from adoption to compromise and rejection. All these encounters show that movement was essential in the creation of art and architecture, whether in Europe, in the Byzantine Empire or beyond, coinciding with the emergence of new artistic trends and reciprocal influences.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

• the circulation of artifacts via diplomatic relations and trade routes
• the spread of new technologies
• the diffusion of iconographical themes
• the dissemination of architectonic vocabulary
• the role played by drawings in the transmission of art and architecture

The Medieval Colloquium offers the opportunity for Research Students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and promote their research. Unfortunately funding for speakers is not available therefore students from outside London are encouraged to apply to their institutions for subsidies to attend the colloquium.

Please send proposals for 15 to 20-minute papers of no more than 250 words and a CV to mariaalessia.rossi@courtauld.ac.uksophie.dentzer@courtauld.ac.ukmatilde.grimaldi@courtauld.ac.uk no later than Friday 21 November 2014.

Applicants will be notified by the beginning of December.

Call for Papers: Byzantine Maritime Technology and Trade

Proposed Colloquium Session for the 2015 AIA Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Jan. 8-11, 2015 Sponsored by: AIA Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology Interest Group and the Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University
Organizers: Rebecca Ingram and Michael Jones, Institute of Nautical Archaeology

Session Overview:

Maritime activity played a vital role in the political and economic success of the Byzantine Empire. Recent fieldwork, both on land and underwater, offers a tantalizing glimpse into the complexity of the Byzantine maritime world. The 58,000 m2 rescue excavation of the Theodosian Harbor in the heart of Istanbul, begun in 2004, is perhaps the most significant of these new discoveries, yielding the remains of 37 Byzantine shipwrecks and tens of thousands of artifacts related to maritime trade, shipbuilding technology, and daily life in Constantinople from the late 4th to the early 11th century. However, because the Yenikapı finds are from the hub of a vast maritime network, they cannot be understood in isolation. Along with the finds from Yenikapı, results from recent studies involving shipwrecks, surveys and excavations of harbor sites, and studies of long-distance trade goods are poised to make a significant contribution to our understanding of Byzantine trade, society, and culture. In order to examine this new data within the proper overall context of late antique and Byzantine archaeology, this colloquium session, co-sponsored by the AIA Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology Interest Group and the Institute of Nautical Archaeology, will present new discoveries from a range of sites concerning maritime activity in this period. This session aims to bring together archaeologists who focus on topics such as ship construction, harbors, metrology, coastal settlement, and maritime trade goods in the Byzantine world. By seeking greater integration between research from terrestrial and nautical archaeological sites, this session will provide an appropriate venue for the dissemination of recent finds and will shed new light on our understanding of the Byzantine Empire and its neighbors.

*******

If you are interested in participating in this colloquium session, please complete the attached form and return it to Rebecca Ingram (rsingram@charter.net) or Michael Jones (rsingram@charter.net) by Friday, March 21, 2014. You will receive an email by the end of March with additional information.