Tag Archives: The Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum

CFP: Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art and Artists of Late Medieval and Renaissance Iberia and Beyond, c. 1400–1550, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28–29 May 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline – Friday 10 January 2020

Anonymous Portuguese cartographer, Cantino Planisphere (detail), ca. 1502. Map on parchment, 220 x 105 cm. Biblioteca Estense Universitaria, Modena, Italy. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Travelling Objects, Travelling People aims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France and the Low Countries, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference will reconsider the dynamics of artistic influence in late medieval Iberia, and place European exchanges in a global context, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, it seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and issues of migration and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.

The theme of ‘travellers’—artists who reached or departed the region, at times more than once in their lives, but also objects and concepts imported and exported—will expand and inflect traditional narratives of late medieval and Renaissance art, underscoring the complexity of global interactions and exchanges which connected the Iberian peninsula to Europe and beyond. Bringing together international scholars working on Iberia and a range of related geographies, the conference seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to expand the field of analysis beyond Europe to encompass relationships with newly acquired dominions, from Madeira to Santo Domingo.

Topics for papers may include, but are not limited to:

  • Iberian artists employed abroad, from the master mason Guillelm Sagrera in Naples, to the sculptor Juan de la Huerta at the Chartreuse de Champmol
  • The close imitation of northern artists in such works as the Portuguese copies of Quentin Metsys’s The Angel Appearing to Saints Clara, Colette and Agnes (early 16th century, Museu de Setúbal / Convento de Jesus, Portugal)
  • ‘Iberian’ objects produced elsewhere, for example Christian ivory carvings made in Goa or Kongo, Afro-Portuguese spoons, and Mexican ‘feather-work’ adopting the vocabulary of northern European late Gothic painting
  • Works made for a non-Iberian audience but purchased and displayed by local patrons.

By encouraging conversations across such seemingly disparate topics and geographies, the conference aims to position the Iberian artistic landscape within the networks of artistic exchange that spanned the medieval and Renaissance worlds, challenging the significance of 1492 as a moment of rupture between the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods.

Proposals are welcome from postgraduate, early-career and established researchers working in all relevant disciplines. Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words together with a short CV and 100-word biography to Costanza.Beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and Sylvia.Alvares-Correa@history.ox.ac.uk by Friday 10 January 2020.

Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Successful candidates will be notified by 17 February. In the first instance, applicants are encouraged to apply to their home institution for travel and accommodation funding. The organisers hope to provide financial support for travel and accommodation to speakers who require it. This conference is made possible by the kind generosity of Sam Fogg.

Please click here for more information.

CFP: Movement in Medieval Art and Architecture (London, 7 February 2015)

Call for Papers:
Movement in Medieval Art and Architecture
20th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium 
London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 7 February 2015

imagePilgrimage, wars and trade are key components of the Middle Ages and all embody movement. This colloquium aims at exploring the importance of movement in the creative processes of medieval art and architecture. Participants are invited to interpret the notion of movement especially in relation to itinerant artists and workshops, the circulation of artworks and the transmission of ideas. Movement will be questioned as a transformative and creative agent in art, in theory as well as in practice. This theme can be expanded to include both local and trans-cultural outcomes of exchanges, ranging from adoption to compromise and rejection. All these encounters show that movement was essential in the creation of art and architecture, whether in Europe, in the Byzantine Empire or beyond, coinciding with the emergence of new artistic trends and reciprocal influences.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

• the circulation of artifacts via diplomatic relations and trade routes
• the spread of new technologies
• the diffusion of iconographical themes
• the dissemination of architectonic vocabulary
• the role played by drawings in the transmission of art and architecture

The Medieval Colloquium offers the opportunity for Research Students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and promote their research. Unfortunately funding for speakers is not available therefore students from outside London are encouraged to apply to their institutions for subsidies to attend the colloquium.

Please send proposals for 15 to 20-minute papers of no more than 250 words and a CV to mariaalessia.rossi@courtauld.ac.uksophie.dentzer@courtauld.ac.ukmatilde.grimaldi@courtauld.ac.uk no later than Friday 21 November 2014.

Applicants will be notified by the beginning of December.

Call For Papers: Sister Act: Female Monasticism and the Arts across Europe ca. 1250 -1550 (London, 13-14 March 2015)

Call for Papers:
Sister Act: Female Monasticism and the Arts across Europe ca. 1250 – 1550
London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 13 – 14 March 2015
Deadline: 10 December 2014
UPDATE: PROGRAMME NOW PUBLISHED

Keynote speaker: Professor Dr. Carola Jäggi, University of Zürich (CH)

sano_detail_1This conference seeks to compare, contrast and juxtapose scholarly approaches to the art of Medieval and Renaissance religious women that have emerged in recent decades. Seeking to initiate a broader conversation, which is long overdue, we invite papers that examine female monastic art in terms of patronage, space, devotional practice, spiritual identity or material history, spanning all of Europe and bridging the gap between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Over the last three decades, within a broader scholarly effort to recover women’s history, art historians have explored the role of gender in the form, function and patronage of monastic art and architecture. It has become evident that the institutionalisation of late medieval and renaissance religious women developed under very different conditions from that of their male counterparts. Monastic foundations for women are repeatedly revealed as having been idiosyncratic, rarely adhering to a set of norms. There are many examples of stable and flourishing institutions performing functions of dynastic memoria for wealthy, aristocratic or royal families. Equally, female convents could be fluid and metamorphic during the course of their history: many instances demonstrate shifting ecclesiastical allegiances, mutable types of monastic life, movement between patrons, and even communities changing order. Such varied historical circumstances shaped the architecture for female religious communities, ranging from large complexes erected in the most fashionable styles of their time, to basic dwellings within converted secular buildings. Diversity can also be observed in the commissioning and use of works of art, from second-hand or adapted paintings to specially commissioned, lavish monuments and vast cycles of wall paintings. In short, artworks in the female religious context escape generalisation.

Idiosyncrasies are found not only when investigating the female monastic complex and its art, but also in the scholarship itself, which has primarily focused on chronologically and geographically specific material, often without engaging in dialogue with adjacent fields.

North of the Alps, scholars tend to gravitate towards the rich Cistercian and Dominican material, and to concentrate on the interplay between visual culture and devotional practice. The 2005 exhibition ‘Krone und Schleier: Kunst aus mittelalterlichen Frauenklöstern’, and the accompanying conference, bore witness to the vibrant wealth of artworks preserved in the German-speaking areas of Europe, and should foster scholarly exchange with other European regions.

On the Italian peninsula, the patchy archival record and damage to physical convent spaces has led to a proliferation of case studies. Renaissance and early modern scholarship has also focused on biographies of individual nuns or specific convent chronicles as means of investigating nunneries within the urban fabric of the Italian city-states from a socio-economic perspective.

Meanwhile, the abundance of surviving artistic material in Spain, Portugal, Scandinavia and Eastern Europe has recently started to receive attention. The art of women who lived in a semi-religious context, such as tertiaries, widows, anchoresses and beguines, has also been brought to the fore. This abundance of recent work now invites comparison and wider interpretation.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers exploring material across the stated time span, in all artistic media and throughout Europe, that deal with either case studies or broader methodological questions. Papers, which take a comparative approach, breaking the traditional regional or chronological boundaries, are particularly welcome. We intend to arrange the papers into panels that present contrasting approaches and/or differing time periods or places, to stimulate comparative discussion.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

– The topography of female religious settlements (e.g. within a city or a region)
– Female monastic architectural space (social aspects, interaction, hierarchies etc.)
– The commemorative function of art and architecture in female religious communities
– The relationship between lay patrons and female religious communities
– Artworks and liturgical/devotional practice
– Religious women as artistic practitioners
– Second-hand or relocated artworks
– The importance of written sources (chronicles, regulations, etc.) for understanding the artistic choices of religious women
– Comparisons between the art of female and male communities
– Artworks for female tertiaries and other semi-monastic groups, comparisons with the art of their second order counterparts
– Patronage networks between individual patrons and/or female religious communities
– Representing collective and individual identity
– The influence of female monastic art beyond the nunnery

Please send your abstracts of 250 – 300 words and a short biography of 100 words to Laura Llewellyn (laura.llewellyn@courtauld.ac.uk) and Michaela Zöschg (michaela.zoschg@courtauld.ac.uk) by 10 December 2014 at the latest.

Unfortunately, we cannot offer travel subsidies. Applicants from outside London are therefore encouraged to apply to other funding bodies for travel bursaries to attend the conference.

Organised by Laura Llewellyn and Michaela Zöschg (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Andrew W Mellon Foundation/Research Forum Postdoctoral Fellowship (Mellon MA) (London, The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Postdoctoral Fellowship:
Andrew W Mellon Foundation/Research Forum Postdoctoral Fellowship (Mellon MA)
London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2016
Deadline: 2 October 2014

courtauld-institute1

The Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is offering a fellowship to an early career researcher in the art of the Italian Renaissance. An interest in the relationship between art and literature is desirable.  This fellowship will give the Fellow the opportunity to pursue a research project while gaining teaching experience in a research environment and participating in the launch of an interdisciplinary M.A. course.  In addition to undertaking research and playing an active role in the Research Forum, the Fellow is expected to teach one B.A. course and to act as an affiliate to the Research Forum/Mellon Foundation M.A. course being offered for the first time in 2015-2016 (From Dante to Michelangelo: Rhetoric, Representation and Identity in Italian Art and Literature, c. 1300-1550) by Dr Scott Nethersole in collaboration with the Mellon Visiting Professor, Dr Frederica Pich (Lecturer in Italian, University of Leeds), a specialist in Italian literature, especially the relationship between poetry and portraiture.

Applicants must be at an early stage of their career, not currently holding or having held a permanent university post and having received a doctorate within the three years prior to the start date of the post (and no later than December 2014).

For more information and to apply, see here.