Tag Archives: Nuns

CFP: Medieval Monks, Nuns and Monastic Life, 15-20 July 2018, Bristol

screenshotCall for Papers: Medieval Monks, Nuns and Monastic Life, 21st Biennial Symposium of the International Medieval Sermon Studies Society (IMSSS), 15-20 July 2018, Bristol
Deadline: 30 September 2017
Organizer:
Professor Carolyn Muessig, Head of the University of Bristol’s Department of Religion and Theology and Co-Director of the Centre for Medieval Studies
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS INCLUDE CLAUDIA RAPP (AUSTRIA) AND BRIAN PATRICK McGUIRE (DENMARK)
The 2018 IMSSS symposium will explore the breadth and depth of sermon literature and preaching activity relating to monks, nuns, and monastic life, and serve as a microcosm of the religious and cultural landscape of the Middle Ages.
The symposium will be based in the beautiful grounds of the University of Bristol’s Wills Hall, and will include a workshop at historic Downside Abbey, with its medieval manuscripts, incunables, and Centre for Monastic Heritage.
We will also visit Wells Cathedral, as well as the medieval sites of Bristol.
Celebrate 2018—the first-ever European Year of Cultural Heritage—by delivering a paper or presenting a poster dealing with an aspect of one of the bedrocks of European culture: monasticism
Topics for posters and papers may include:
-the form or content that could distinguish a monastic sermon from others
-monks, nuns, and monasticism in Byzantine or other forms of medieval Eastern and African Christianity
-the Rule of Benedict and preaching
-preaching in monastic churches and chapter houses
-monastic figures preaching in public forums (churches, crusades)
-monastic preaching in or regarding schools and universities
-preaching by and about nuns
de sanctis sermons on holy monks and nuns
-monasticism as treated in sermons
-sermons and the reformed monastic life (e.g., Camaldolese, Carthusian, Celestinian, Cistercian, Cluniac,et alii)
-preaching by and about hermits
-monastic rules in and about preaching
-monastic communities in conflict or in harmony
-monastic rejection/appropriation of mendicant sermons/preaching/identity
-monks as characters in sermons, exempla and religious literature
-gender in monastic preaching
-monks/nuns in ad status sermon literature
-monastic preaching in art
-monks, nuns, and monasticism in pre-modern sermons of religious traditions other than Christianity (e.g. , Islam, Buddhism, Taoism)
-the influence of Christian monks, nuns, & monastic sermons on preaching in other religions
-and more!
How to apply: send your abstracts for papers and posters (150 words) before 30 September 2017 (and any queries) to: imsss-2018@bristol.ac.uk

Call For Papers: Sister Act: Female Monasticism and the Arts across Europe ca. 1250 -1550 (London, 13-14 March 2015)

Call for Papers:
Sister Act: Female Monasticism and the Arts across Europe ca. 1250 – 1550
London, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 13 – 14 March 2015
Deadline: 10 December 2014
UPDATE: PROGRAMME NOW PUBLISHED

Keynote speaker: Professor Dr. Carola Jäggi, University of Zürich (CH)

sano_detail_1This conference seeks to compare, contrast and juxtapose scholarly approaches to the art of Medieval and Renaissance religious women that have emerged in recent decades. Seeking to initiate a broader conversation, which is long overdue, we invite papers that examine female monastic art in terms of patronage, space, devotional practice, spiritual identity or material history, spanning all of Europe and bridging the gap between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Over the last three decades, within a broader scholarly effort to recover women’s history, art historians have explored the role of gender in the form, function and patronage of monastic art and architecture. It has become evident that the institutionalisation of late medieval and renaissance religious women developed under very different conditions from that of their male counterparts. Monastic foundations for women are repeatedly revealed as having been idiosyncratic, rarely adhering to a set of norms. There are many examples of stable and flourishing institutions performing functions of dynastic memoria for wealthy, aristocratic or royal families. Equally, female convents could be fluid and metamorphic during the course of their history: many instances demonstrate shifting ecclesiastical allegiances, mutable types of monastic life, movement between patrons, and even communities changing order. Such varied historical circumstances shaped the architecture for female religious communities, ranging from large complexes erected in the most fashionable styles of their time, to basic dwellings within converted secular buildings. Diversity can also be observed in the commissioning and use of works of art, from second-hand or adapted paintings to specially commissioned, lavish monuments and vast cycles of wall paintings. In short, artworks in the female religious context escape generalisation.

Idiosyncrasies are found not only when investigating the female monastic complex and its art, but also in the scholarship itself, which has primarily focused on chronologically and geographically specific material, often without engaging in dialogue with adjacent fields.

North of the Alps, scholars tend to gravitate towards the rich Cistercian and Dominican material, and to concentrate on the interplay between visual culture and devotional practice. The 2005 exhibition ‘Krone und Schleier: Kunst aus mittelalterlichen Frauenklöstern’, and the accompanying conference, bore witness to the vibrant wealth of artworks preserved in the German-speaking areas of Europe, and should foster scholarly exchange with other European regions.

On the Italian peninsula, the patchy archival record and damage to physical convent spaces has led to a proliferation of case studies. Renaissance and early modern scholarship has also focused on biographies of individual nuns or specific convent chronicles as means of investigating nunneries within the urban fabric of the Italian city-states from a socio-economic perspective.

Meanwhile, the abundance of surviving artistic material in Spain, Portugal, Scandinavia and Eastern Europe has recently started to receive attention. The art of women who lived in a semi-religious context, such as tertiaries, widows, anchoresses and beguines, has also been brought to the fore. This abundance of recent work now invites comparison and wider interpretation.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers exploring material across the stated time span, in all artistic media and throughout Europe, that deal with either case studies or broader methodological questions. Papers, which take a comparative approach, breaking the traditional regional or chronological boundaries, are particularly welcome. We intend to arrange the papers into panels that present contrasting approaches and/or differing time periods or places, to stimulate comparative discussion.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

– The topography of female religious settlements (e.g. within a city or a region)
– Female monastic architectural space (social aspects, interaction, hierarchies etc.)
– The commemorative function of art and architecture in female religious communities
– The relationship between lay patrons and female religious communities
– Artworks and liturgical/devotional practice
– Religious women as artistic practitioners
– Second-hand or relocated artworks
– The importance of written sources (chronicles, regulations, etc.) for understanding the artistic choices of religious women
– Comparisons between the art of female and male communities
– Artworks for female tertiaries and other semi-monastic groups, comparisons with the art of their second order counterparts
– Patronage networks between individual patrons and/or female religious communities
– Representing collective and individual identity
– The influence of female monastic art beyond the nunnery

Please send your abstracts of 250 – 300 words and a short biography of 100 words to Laura Llewellyn (laura.llewellyn@courtauld.ac.uk) and Michaela Zöschg (michaela.zoschg@courtauld.ac.uk) by 10 December 2014 at the latest.

Unfortunately, we cannot offer travel subsidies. Applicants from outside London are therefore encouraged to apply to other funding bodies for travel bursaries to attend the conference.

Organised by Laura Llewellyn and Michaela Zöschg (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Call for papers: Latinate Nuns and Liturgical Commentary: The Graduals from Paradies bei Soest, c.1360-1425, Leuven

indexProfessor Jeffrey H. Hamburger (Harvard University) is the holder of the 2014 LECTIO Chair. Aside his public lecture on Tuesday 27 May entitled “The Autonomy of Images: The Prayer Book of Ursula Begerin and Late Medieval Picture Books”, he will give on 28 May a Doctoral Seminar “Latinate Nuns and Liturgical Commentary: The Graduals from Paradies bei Soest, ca. 1360-1425”.

On the occasion of this seminar, a selection of early-stage scholars (PhD students and postdocs) are given the opportunity to present their research during a paper session and to discuss it with the chair holder, the scientific committee and other colleagues.
Three domains have been selected: (1) ‘Hearing as viewing, viewing as sensing’. The medieval book and manuscript as synesthetic medium; (2) ‘Nuns as artists’ revisited after the material turn; and (3) ‘Word & Image’. Methodological challenges for interdisciplinary studies.

We invite early-stage researchers to submit proposals for papers in one of the aforementioned domains. We especially welcome interdisciplinary and innovative scholarly case studies that document these topics, from fields as diverse as philosophy, history, history of art, theology and religion, musicology, manuscript studies, gender studies, and hagiography. Selected researchers are expected to give a brief 10-minutes presentation in English.

A single page description of the proposed poster and a short CV should be submitted no later than 21 April 2014 to lectio@kuleuven.be.
Scholars who want to attend the seminar without presenting a poster are also asked to express their interest before that date.