Tag Archives: love

CFP: Illustrating Love: From Myth to Manual, Athens, GA, March 22–23, 2019

Apollonio di Giovanni di Tomaso and Workshop. Panel from a Marriage Chest with Story of an Assault on a Maritime City, ca. 1460. Museo Stibbert, Florence

Deadline: Nov 30, 2018

Call For Papers
Illustrating Love: From Myth to Manual
UGA Emerging Scholars Symposium—March 22-23rd, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Paul Barolsky

Submissions Due: November 30, 2018

The Association of Graduate Art Students (AGAS) at the University of Georgia, in partnership with the Georgia Museum of Art, invites emerging scholars to submit proposals for papers that contribute to a discussion of love in the visual arts. The symposium will be held in conjunction with the exhibition Life, Love, and Marriage Chests in Renaissance Florence, on view at the Georgia Museum of Art March 9—May 26, 2019.

Our symposium will expand the scope of the exhibition by addressing attempts to articulate love throughout the history of visual and material culture. Expressing the many facets of this complex emotion has been a preoccupation in the arts for generations, with artists across genres and media vying to capture the elusive sentiment. Through myth, allegory, and even religion, depictions of love mark cultures’ interpersonal values, both in public and in private. The arts of love reveal society’s most intimate desires, depicting narratives that codify their ideals. From beauty, sexuality, and family to status, agency, and identity, our symposium seeks submissions that exemplify the myriad archetypes related to love.

Submissions that discuss specific works of art or themes related to Life, Love, and Marriage Chests in Renaissance Florence are encouraged. Other relevant topics include but are not limited to:

•    Courtly love
•    Allegories of love and marriage
•    Gender roles in the domestic space
•    Eroticism and the nude
•    Love poetry and the visual arts

Current graduate students and other emerging scholars should submit abstracts (maximum 300 words) and an up-to-date CV to uga.symposium@gmail.com by November 30, 2018. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decision by December 31, 2018.

Life, Love, and Marriage Chests in Renaissance Florence and related educational programs are made possible by the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.

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CFP: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018, Bloomington, Indiana

5487225791_f2f9dd3b91Call for Papers: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018,

Keynote: Elizabeth Allen, University of California, Irvine

The Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University invites proposals for its 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, April 6-7, 2018, in Bloomington, Indiana

Iron maidens, the Inquisition, the Crusades, witch burnings: these images of violence, both fact and fiction, are profoundly connected to the Middle Ages. Yet if in many popular conceptions, the medieval world is associated with brutality and suffering, the period also offers unique formulations of mercy, compassion, and the power of resistance. In exploring both medieval violence or nonviolence, this symposium seeks to examine specific structures of power and brutality but also to complicate the narrative of the violent Middle Ages.

We invite papers on any medieval discipline or region that engage issues of medieval violence and nonviolence: What functions did violence serve in the Middle Ages? How might acts of physical and rhetorical violence against othered groups (gendered, religious, cultural, racial, nonhuman) reflect larger concerns or anxieties within medieval culture? Is there a medieval aesthetic of violence? How does medieval music, art, theology, and literature glorify or critique brutality and/or suffering? How do medieval texts understand the uses and effects of verbal violence? How might medieval violence operate in a metaphorical sense, as violence done to texts or to the material past? What does nonviolence look like in the Middle Ages? Given the functions and pervasiveness of violence, what are some ways in which it is resisted and negotiated? What alternatives do medieval people or institutions offer to violence? How might medieval understandings of mercy or love act as a counter to violence? We also encourage papers on modern representations of the Middle Ages that consider to what extent and to what ends these medievalisms employ violence and nonviolence.

We are also excited to announce that graduate students whose papers have been accepted for the symposium are invited to submit their papers by March 2, 2018 to be considered for the IU Medieval Studies Symposium Paper Prize. Papers will be evaluated by a panel of IU medieval faculty. The prize of $250 will be awarded before the symposium to help defray the cost of travel, and the winner will be noted in the program.

Please submit 200 word abstracts or complete sessions proposals to IUMestSymposium@gmail.com by November 24, 2017.