Tag Archives: Late Medieval

CFP: Illustrating Love: From Myth to Manual, Athens, GA, March 22–23, 2019

Apollonio di Giovanni di Tomaso and Workshop. Panel from a Marriage Chest with Story of an Assault on a Maritime City, ca. 1460. Museo Stibbert, Florence

Deadline: Nov 30, 2018

Call For Papers
Illustrating Love: From Myth to Manual
UGA Emerging Scholars Symposium—March 22-23rd, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Paul Barolsky

Submissions Due: November 30, 2018

The Association of Graduate Art Students (AGAS) at the University of Georgia, in partnership with the Georgia Museum of Art, invites emerging scholars to submit proposals for papers that contribute to a discussion of love in the visual arts. The symposium will be held in conjunction with the exhibition Life, Love, and Marriage Chests in Renaissance Florence, on view at the Georgia Museum of Art March 9—May 26, 2019.

Our symposium will expand the scope of the exhibition by addressing attempts to articulate love throughout the history of visual and material culture. Expressing the many facets of this complex emotion has been a preoccupation in the arts for generations, with artists across genres and media vying to capture the elusive sentiment. Through myth, allegory, and even religion, depictions of love mark cultures’ interpersonal values, both in public and in private. The arts of love reveal society’s most intimate desires, depicting narratives that codify their ideals. From beauty, sexuality, and family to status, agency, and identity, our symposium seeks submissions that exemplify the myriad archetypes related to love.

Submissions that discuss specific works of art or themes related to Life, Love, and Marriage Chests in Renaissance Florence are encouraged. Other relevant topics include but are not limited to:

•    Courtly love
•    Allegories of love and marriage
•    Gender roles in the domestic space
•    Eroticism and the nude
•    Love poetry and the visual arts

Current graduate students and other emerging scholars should submit abstracts (maximum 300 words) and an up-to-date CV to uga.symposium@gmail.com by November 30, 2018. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decision by December 31, 2018.

Life, Love, and Marriage Chests in Renaissance Florence and related educational programs are made possible by the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.

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Conference: Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean, UNED, Madrid, October 26, 2018

Image result for portolano mediterraneoINTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean: sociability networks and artistic creation in the Late Medieval and Early Modern periods
UNED, Madrid 26 de octubre de 2018.

9.30. Presentación
SESIÓN 1: Alteridades móviles: La visión del otro en la literatura y el arte
Modera: Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza (UCM)
10:00-10:20: Representando al otro: tejidos y vestidos en los espacios de sociabilidad en el siglo XV castellano. Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
10:20-10:40: The Fifth Column: rethinking the Morisco’s visual representation. Borja Franco Llopis (UNED).
10:40-11:00: La visión del cristiano como “otro”. Alteridad en el Mediterráneo Otomano. Miguel Ángel de Bunes Ibarra (CSIC).
11:00-11:30: DEBATE
11:30-12:00: PAUSA-CAFÉ

Sesión 2: Redes de saber, redes de poder: Objetos y conocimientos en circulación
Modera: Consuelo Gómez López (UNED)
12:00-12:20: Movilidad, circulación, interacción. La formación de un grupo de presión belicista en la monarquía policéntrica de los Habsburgo (Génova, Madrid, País Vasco – siglo XVI) Bastien Carpentier (Université Littoral Côte d’Opale)
12:20-12:40: No solo inventarios. Bibliotecas en movimiento en el Mediterráneo. Margarita Vázquez Manassero (UNED)
12:40-13:00: Un mar en papeles para los ojos de Felipe II: la ciencia y el dibujo del ingeniero. Alicia Cámara Muñoz (UNED)
13:00-13:30: DEBATE
13:30-15:30: COMIDA

Sesión 3: El Mediterráneo: espacio de conflicto, espacio de intercambio.
Modera: Fernando Rodríguez Mediano (CSIC-CORPI)
15.30-15:50: Los espías del rey. La inteligencia hispano-imperial contra el turco (siglo XVI) Gennaro Varriale (Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”)
15:50-16:10 Caravaggio in Malta and his connection to the Ottoman Art. Filiz Çakir Phillip (Aga Khan Museum Toronto).
16:10-16:30: Between objects and subjects: slaves and religious artifacts in the 17th Mediterranean. Daniel Hershenzon (University of Connecticut)
16:30-17:00 DEBATE
17:00-17:30: PAUSA CAFÉ

Sesión 4: Un Mediterráneo global. Dinámicas transoceánicas  del siglo XVI
Modera: Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
17:30-17:50 Lepanto in the Americas: Global Storytelling and Mediterranean History. Stefan Hanß (University of Manchester)
17:50-18:10: American objects at the beginning of the sixteenth century Antonio Urquízar Herrera (UNED).
18:10-18:30: DEBATE

18.30 CONCLUSIONES Y CLAUSURA

Evento patrocinado por la Facultad de Geografía e Historia y el Departamento de Historia del Arte de la UNED y organizado dentro del proyecto: HAR2016-80354-P. IMPI. Antes del orientalismo: Las “imágenes” del musulmán en la Península Ibérica (siglos XV-XVII) y sus conexiones mediterráneas (Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología y Universidades- Fondos FEDER).
Actividad del Grupo de Investigación: Arte y Pensamiento en la Edad Moderna y Contemporánea

Dirección científica: Elena Paulino Montero
Coordinación científica: Borja Franco Llopis

Click here for more information

Call for Papers: ‘Wounds Visible and Invisible in Late Medieval Christianity’, ICMS 2019 (Deadline: 15 September 2018)

31333806172_4c82f814f2_b54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 9 – 12, 2019
Deadline: 15 September 2018

This session examines the many valences of wounds in late medieval Christianity, focusing on themes surrounding wounds and wounding both visible (corporeal and/or material) and invisible (rhetorical and allegorical). The image of the wounded body held a central place in late medieval Christian practice and material culture; the wounds of the crucified Christ were tangible reminders of his Passion and served as foci of veneration, while stigmatic saints and maimed martyrs were marked as holy by means of bodily trauma. Papers may also consider the Christian response to physical injury, in the form of saintly intervention through healing miracles and medical intervention through the establishment of hospitals and provision of care by religious orders.

Moving beyond the ample possibilities for discussion stemming from the theme of “visible” wounds in medieval Christianity, this session also encourages a broad examination of “invisible” wounds within the late medieval Christian context. Examples might range from the accusations of metaphorical violence levied against the mendicant orders by antifraternal critics, to the conceptualization of the Western Schism as a wound to the Church. By exploring wounds both “visible” and “invisible,” this session elicits the perspectives of scholars of history, art history, literature, and theology and seeks to expand conceptions of wounds and injury within a late medieval Christian framework.

Please send a brief proposal (300 words max) and a participant information form (currently available at https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to Hannah Wood at Hannah.wood@mail.utoronto.ca and Johanna Pollick at j.pollick.1@research.gla.ac.uk by 15th September 2018.

As per ICMS rules, any abstracts not accepted for our session will be forwarded for consideration for General Sessions.

CFP: 5th Annual Jane Fortune Conference: The Colors of Paradise. Painting Miniatures in Italian Convents, ca. 1300-1700, The Library of San Marco, Florence, October 11 – 12, 2018

gradual1Call for Papers: 5th Annual Jane Fortune Conference: The Colors of Paradise. Painting Miniatures in Italian Convents, ca. 1300-1700, The Library of San Marco, Florence, October 11 – 12, 2018T
Deadline: 15 January, 2018

5th Annual Jane Fortune Conference

The Colors of Paradise. Painting Miniatures in Italian Convents, ca. 1300-1700

This conference is co-organized by The Medici Archive Project and the Museo Nazionale di San Marco.

Since the late Medieval period, members of female religious communities have engaged in the making of small-scale paintings, or miniatures, on a wide variety of supports. Many of these miniatures were produced to ornament liturgical and devotional books; others graced objects such as candles and altar frontals. While nuns’ activity in this realm has been documented quite extensively in northern Europe, the Italian production of miniatures is less understood, aside from case studies of a few individuals such as Eufrasia Burlamacchi (1482 –1548). It is hoped that this conference will not only consolidate what is known about the production of miniatures by Italian nuns, but also catalyze new research. To encourage reflection upon the continuity of technical practices and models across arbitrary period divisions, the time frame of this conference has been extended broadly. Insight obtained through technical examination or the material analysis of nuns’ artworks will be especially welcome.

Papers may be given in Italian or English.

Suggested Paper Topics:

-Technical studies identifying pigments, binding media, or supports for miniatures produced in or for Italian convents
-New attributions of miniatures to Italian nun artists
-Biographical studies on Italian nuns who made miniatures
-Analyses of the visual or textual sources of the iconography of Italian nuns’ miniatures
-Miniature painting considered within the context of liturgy, devotional practices, and the organization of the conventual life of Italian nuns.
-The commissioning, gifting, and circulation of works containing Italian nuns’ miniatures
-Comparitive studies of miniatures and Italian nuns’ work in other media such as embroidery
-Considerations of the technical know-how and workshop materials available to Italian nuns, as well as their collaborations with artisans outside the convent
-Reflections on problematic issues in the current historiography on the topic, and on methodology

The conference will take place on both the afternoon of Thursday, October 11, and the morning of Friday, October 12, 2018, and it will be held in the Biblioteca di San Marco in Florence.

To apply: please send a CV and a brief abstract of your paper, in English or Italian, to: barker@medici.org by January 15, 2018. Decisions will be announced within three weeks. Limited funding may be available for travel and lodging.

CFP: Mobility and Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, University of Oxford, 23 June 2017

Call for Papers: Mobility and Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Oxford University, 23 June 2017

Deadline for submissions: 1 February 2017

The application of spatial paradigms to the study of late medieval and early modern societies is now well underway. In contrast, the so-called ‘mobility turn’ has struggled to find its way from the social sciences to the humanities and particularly to disciplines concerned with the study of the past. This conference proposes to bring the two together by exploring how everyday mobility contributed to the shaping of late medieval and early modern spaces, and how spatial frameworks affected the movement of people in pre-modern Europe.

In focusing on these issues, the conference also intends to relate to current social challenges. The world is now more mobile than ever, yet it is often argued that more spatial boundaries exist today than ever before. The conference hopes to reflect on this contemporary paradox by exploring the long-term history of the tension between the dynamism of communities, groups and individuals, and the human construction of places and boundaries.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit proposals of no more than 300 words for 20-minute papers. Papers may engage with questions of mobility and space at a variety of levels (regional, urban, domestic) and interdisciplinary approaches are particularly encouraged.

Potential sub-topics may include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Performing space through movement (border patrols, civic and religious processions, frontier trespassing)
  • Mobile practices in public spaces (itinerant courts, temporary fairs, diplomatic exchanges, travelling performances, revolts on the move)
  • Narrating movement, imagining space (pilgrimage guides, travel diaries, merchant itineraries, road maps)
  • Digital scholarship in exploring the intersections between mobility and space (network analysis, flow modelling, GIS-based research)


Please send your proposal and a brief bio
 to luca.zenobi@history.ox.ac.uk & pablo.gonzalezmartin@history.ox.ac.uk.

New Publications: The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch

hmsah_77The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch: Imagining Antichrist and Others from the Middle Ages to the Reformation

Author: D.H. Strickland

Brepols Publishers

This study examines medieval Christian views of non-Christians and their changing political and theological significance as revealed in late-medieval and early-modern visual culture. Taking as her point of departure Hieronymus Bosch’s famous Epiphany triptych housed in the Prado Museum in Madrid, the author analyzes how representations of Jews, Saracens (later Turks), ‘Ethiopians’, and Mongols for centuries shaped western Christian attitudes towards salvation history, contemporary political conflicts, and the declining status of the Roman Church. She argues that Bosch’s innovative pictorial warning of the coming of Antichrist and the threat posed by non-Christians gained its power and authority through inter-visual references to the medieval past. Before and after Bosch, imaginative constructions that identified Jews and Turks with Gog and Magog, or the Pope with Antichrist, drew upon a long-established range of artistic and rhetorical strategies that artists and authors reconfigured as changing political circumstances demanded. Painted at a pivotal moment on the eve of the Reformation, the Prado Epiphany is a compelling lens through which to look backwards to the Middle Ages, and forwards to Martin Luther and the ideological significance of escalating Christian/non-Christian conflicts in the formation of the new Protestant church.

ANN: Summer Course: Study of the Arts in Flanders (Leuven, 18-29 June 2017)

 

campagne_sc3bis_0Leuven, Belgium, June 18 – 28, 2017

Deadline: Nov 30, 2016

 

 

Several Flemish research centres, universities and art museums
collaboratively organise the third edition of the Summer Course for the
Study of the Arts in Flanders in the summer of 2017. After the success
of the two previous editions with a focus on Jan van Eyck and Peter
Paul Rubens, this edition zooms in on Late Medieval and Early
Renaissance Sculpture. The target group for the course are master and
PhD-students in (art) history and junior curators from all over the
world.

The aim of the Summer Course is to bring to Flanders, annually, a group
of 18 select national and international, highly qualified young
researchers and to present them with an intensive 11-day program of
lectures, discussions, and on-site visits. The theme varies annually
and focuses each year on a different art-historical period. The aim is
to provide the participants with a clear insight into the Flemish art
collections from the period at hand, as well as into the available and
most suited research methods, the state of the research and the
research needs. After the course the students will be ambassadors for
the Flemish arts abroad.

The third edition of the summer course is titled Medieval and
Renaissance Sculpture in the Low Countries and will take place from
June 18 through June 28, 2017. It is coordinated by Museum M – Leuven
and the Flemish Art Collection. Excursions will be made to Leuven,
Mechelen, Bruges, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Maastricht, Aachen,
Liège, Zoutleeuw and Brussels. The language of the Summer Course will
be English.

Candidates have earned an MA or are enrolled in a PhD programme, with a
focus on Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Sculpture. Candidates are
at the start of their professional career.
Thanks to the generous support of the Flemish Government the
participation fee of the Summer Course is now set at €900 per person.
The fee includes the full 11-day programme, 10 overnight hotel stays in
a single-occupancy room, all transportation within the programme, all
entry tickets, 2 receptions, 5 lunches and 5 dinners. Not included in
the participation fee is the transportation to and from Belgium.

Four grants in total will be awarded. Thanks to the generous support of
the Samuel H. Kress Foundation’s History of Art Grants Program 2 US
students and citizens are offered a grant that will fully cover the
programme fee and round trip flights between Belgium and the US.

The organisers of the Summer Course together with the Flemish
Government have made available 2 grants of €450 each. The recipients of
the grant will pay a reduced participation fee of €450 instead of the
regular fee.

Apply now through November 30, 2016. Mail to
Matthias.Depoorter@vlaamsekunstcollectie.be.

The Summer Course is a joint initiative of Museum M – Leuven, the Royal
Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp, the Groeninge Museum Bruges, the Museum of
Fine Arts Ghent, the University of Ghent, the Catholic University of
Leuven, the Flemish Research Centre for the Arts in the Burgundian
Netherlands, the Rubenianum and the Flemish Art Collection. The
structural content partner for this edition is the Royal Institute for
Cultural Heritage.

Contact: Matthias.Depoorter@vlaamsekunstcollectie.be
Website: http://summercourse.eu
Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1VSivk4
Youtube: https://youtu.be/p95n769iVI0