Tag Archives: Late Medieval

CFP: Mobility and Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, University of Oxford, 23 June 2017

Call for Papers: Mobility and Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Oxford University, 23 June 2017

Deadline for submissions: 1 February 2017

The application of spatial paradigms to the study of late medieval and early modern societies is now well underway. In contrast, the so-called ‘mobility turn’ has struggled to find its way from the social sciences to the humanities and particularly to disciplines concerned with the study of the past. This conference proposes to bring the two together by exploring how everyday mobility contributed to the shaping of late medieval and early modern spaces, and how spatial frameworks affected the movement of people in pre-modern Europe.

In focusing on these issues, the conference also intends to relate to current social challenges. The world is now more mobile than ever, yet it is often argued that more spatial boundaries exist today than ever before. The conference hopes to reflect on this contemporary paradox by exploring the long-term history of the tension between the dynamism of communities, groups and individuals, and the human construction of places and boundaries.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit proposals of no more than 300 words for 20-minute papers. Papers may engage with questions of mobility and space at a variety of levels (regional, urban, domestic) and interdisciplinary approaches are particularly encouraged.

Potential sub-topics may include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Performing space through movement (border patrols, civic and religious processions, frontier trespassing)
  • Mobile practices in public spaces (itinerant courts, temporary fairs, diplomatic exchanges, travelling performances, revolts on the move)
  • Narrating movement, imagining space (pilgrimage guides, travel diaries, merchant itineraries, road maps)
  • Digital scholarship in exploring the intersections between mobility and space (network analysis, flow modelling, GIS-based research)


Please send your proposal and a brief bio
 to luca.zenobi@history.ox.ac.uk & pablo.gonzalezmartin@history.ox.ac.uk.

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New Publications: The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch

hmsah_77The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch: Imagining Antichrist and Others from the Middle Ages to the Reformation

Author: D.H. Strickland

Brepols Publishers

This study examines medieval Christian views of non-Christians and their changing political and theological significance as revealed in late-medieval and early-modern visual culture. Taking as her point of departure Hieronymus Bosch’s famous Epiphany triptych housed in the Prado Museum in Madrid, the author analyzes how representations of Jews, Saracens (later Turks), ‘Ethiopians’, and Mongols for centuries shaped western Christian attitudes towards salvation history, contemporary political conflicts, and the declining status of the Roman Church. She argues that Bosch’s innovative pictorial warning of the coming of Antichrist and the threat posed by non-Christians gained its power and authority through inter-visual references to the medieval past. Before and after Bosch, imaginative constructions that identified Jews and Turks with Gog and Magog, or the Pope with Antichrist, drew upon a long-established range of artistic and rhetorical strategies that artists and authors reconfigured as changing political circumstances demanded. Painted at a pivotal moment on the eve of the Reformation, the Prado Epiphany is a compelling lens through which to look backwards to the Middle Ages, and forwards to Martin Luther and the ideological significance of escalating Christian/non-Christian conflicts in the formation of the new Protestant church.

ANN: Summer Course: Study of the Arts in Flanders (Leuven, 18-29 June 2017)

 

campagne_sc3bis_0Leuven, Belgium, June 18 – 28, 2017

Deadline: Nov 30, 2016

 

 

Several Flemish research centres, universities and art museums
collaboratively organise the third edition of the Summer Course for the
Study of the Arts in Flanders in the summer of 2017. After the success
of the two previous editions with a focus on Jan van Eyck and Peter
Paul Rubens, this edition zooms in on Late Medieval and Early
Renaissance Sculpture. The target group for the course are master and
PhD-students in (art) history and junior curators from all over the
world.

The aim of the Summer Course is to bring to Flanders, annually, a group
of 18 select national and international, highly qualified young
researchers and to present them with an intensive 11-day program of
lectures, discussions, and on-site visits. The theme varies annually
and focuses each year on a different art-historical period. The aim is
to provide the participants with a clear insight into the Flemish art
collections from the period at hand, as well as into the available and
most suited research methods, the state of the research and the
research needs. After the course the students will be ambassadors for
the Flemish arts abroad.

The third edition of the summer course is titled Medieval and
Renaissance Sculpture in the Low Countries and will take place from
June 18 through June 28, 2017. It is coordinated by Museum M – Leuven
and the Flemish Art Collection. Excursions will be made to Leuven,
Mechelen, Bruges, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Maastricht, Aachen,
Liège, Zoutleeuw and Brussels. The language of the Summer Course will
be English.

Candidates have earned an MA or are enrolled in a PhD programme, with a
focus on Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Sculpture. Candidates are
at the start of their professional career.
Thanks to the generous support of the Flemish Government the
participation fee of the Summer Course is now set at €900 per person.
The fee includes the full 11-day programme, 10 overnight hotel stays in
a single-occupancy room, all transportation within the programme, all
entry tickets, 2 receptions, 5 lunches and 5 dinners. Not included in
the participation fee is the transportation to and from Belgium.

Four grants in total will be awarded. Thanks to the generous support of
the Samuel H. Kress Foundation’s History of Art Grants Program 2 US
students and citizens are offered a grant that will fully cover the
programme fee and round trip flights between Belgium and the US.

The organisers of the Summer Course together with the Flemish
Government have made available 2 grants of €450 each. The recipients of
the grant will pay a reduced participation fee of €450 instead of the
regular fee.

Apply now through November 30, 2016. Mail to
Matthias.Depoorter@vlaamsekunstcollectie.be.

The Summer Course is a joint initiative of Museum M – Leuven, the Royal
Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp, the Groeninge Museum Bruges, the Museum of
Fine Arts Ghent, the University of Ghent, the Catholic University of
Leuven, the Flemish Research Centre for the Arts in the Burgundian
Netherlands, the Rubenianum and the Flemish Art Collection. The
structural content partner for this edition is the Royal Institute for
Cultural Heritage.

Contact: Matthias.Depoorter@vlaamsekunstcollectie.be
Website: http://summercourse.eu
Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1VSivk4
Youtube: https://youtu.be/p95n769iVI0

Postdoctoral Fellow in Islamic Art, Washington University in St. Louis

photoJob: Postdoctoral Fellow in Islamic Art, Washington University in St. Louis
Start date: July 1, 2017
Deadline:  December 2, 2016

The Department of Art History and Archaeology at Washington University in St. Louis, and the Saint Louis Art Museum seek a specialist in Islamic Art for a joint teaching-curatorial two-year position beginning July 1, 2017 (start date could be moved slightly later). The fellow will spend two semesters at Washington University in the Fall of 2017 and Spring of 2019, teaching two courses in each of those semesters. The fellow will spend the twelve-month period of 2018 working full-time at the Saint Louis Art Museum (SLAM) as an A. W. Mellon Fellow, where they will conduct research, and give docent and gallery talks in their area of expertise. It is thus envisioned that the candidate will spend a year in total at each institution over the two-year period. Courses at Washington University, a leading research institution, will be offered to a combination of beginning and advanced undergraduates, and perhaps graduate students, in art history and related fields.

If the successful fellow is a specialist in Islamic Art, she or he will teach an introductory-level course that will broadly address the field of Islamic Art; other classes may focus on traditions of miniature painting, the sacred arts of Islam, or the visual arts of Persia (Safavid) and/or India (Mughal). A course on modern or contemporary art in the Islamic world may be considered. At SLAM, a fellow in Islamic art may catalogue and interpret a collection of 50 works on paper and related objects, primarily from Persia and India in the Safavid and Mughal periods. Scholarly expertise in these areas is highly desired, but other areas will be considered. The fellow will curate the current gallery spaces for Islamic art, work with conservation staff on the collection, and research possible acquisitions.

How to apply: The applicant should have no more than three years of postdoctoral teaching or curatorial experience in the field at the start of the appointment. Annual salary will be $50,000 a year, plus moving expenses, benefits, and generous research and travel funds. To apply, please go to https://jobs.wustl.edu/ and search for job posting #34616. Required materials which may be uploaded to the website include a letter of interest, current c.v., and a writing sample. The required three confidential letters of recommendation and any writing samples too large to be uploaded should be directed to Prof. Elizabeth Childs, Chair, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Washington University, CB 1189, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899 or emailed to artarch@wustl.edu. Review of applications begins December 2, 2016. Initial interviews will be conducted by Skype; some may be scheduled at CAA in Washington, D.C. Finalists will be brought to St Louis.

CFP: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8Call for Papers: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)
Deadline: November 30, 2016

Issue 2018: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture,
1400-1700’

In his letter to Philippe de Lannoy, from 1578 (De ratione cum fructu
perigrinandi et preaesertim in Italia), Justus Lipsius summarized the
aims of traveling as: ‘utilitas’ and ‘voluptas’. Traveling, according
to Lipsius, would lead to spiritual enrichment, as it would bring one
into contact with different people, different lifestyles, and different
customs and morals. At the same time, it would increase knowledge about
other countries and places, and about history. More or less at the same
time appeared a growing number of guides and treatises on traveling
(artes apodemicae), meant to prepare travelers for their trip, giving
advice on how to deal with the various mores in different countries and
supplying ‘cultural’ information on topography, history, important
monuments and other attractions.

In this volume, we want to study the production of knowledge shaped by
the traveling guides and artes apodemicae, especially in their
interaction with the actual practices of traveling and acquiring
knowledge. What was the formative importance of (printed) guides and
travel literature for the practice of traveling? How decisive was the
information they supplied in directing the travelers’ interest and
attention, and in shaping their views and knowledge? Or, the other way
round, was the information offered in guides and art literature
specified and/or expanded, or did it acquire a different scope as a
result of increasing knowledge or ‘new’ fields of interest developed by
travelers? And in which ways did the literature on traveling affect
other areas of knowledge production, either established academic
disciplines or new fields of knowledge?

Topics to be addressed may include:
– The use of travel literature and (national or local) guides. As books
were often too heavy or expensive to carry around during a visit ‘on
the spot’, to what extent and in which way were they consulted
beforehand or afterwards? How did this use beforehand or afterwards
affect the visitors’ experience?
Travel literature and (national or local) guides in relation to travel
accounts. As travel reports were often written after the voyage had
been made, much of the information in them was based on consultation of
guides afterwards. What does that mean for the reliability of travel
accounts?
– What was the impact of the  target audience of (national or local)
guides? What differences can be discerned between guides written in
Latin (obviously for a learned public) and vernacular ones (or
vernacular versions)? To what extent was the kind of information
adapted (expanded, or cut down) to target a wider audience?
– What was the nature and scope of travel reports? Were they in the
first place  a listing of things done and visited or do they reflect
the ‘spiritual enrichment’ that travel theorists such as Lipsius were
writing about? What kind of travel accounts were published and what
kind remained in manuscript, and what does that say about their aim,
function and intended audience?
– How much of the information offered in (national or local) guides was
actually ‘new’? To a large extent, the various guides of a specific
city or region repeated each other. Were they regularly updated with
the inclusion of new monuments (recently finished buildings, modern
works of art, etc.) or with newly acquired information (dates and names
etc.)?
– To what extent have their listings of monuments shaped our present
canon of important art works and ‘not to be missed’ attractions? Are
monuments that were not included (e.g. because they were not (easily)
accessible) still being disregarded, even though they were/are of high
cultural or historical importance?
– The importance of other sources of information besides guides and
travel literature, such as (historical) writings by antique, medieval
and (near) contemporary authors, collections of inscriptions, prints
and book illustrations.

How to submit: Please submit a one-page abstract (ca. 300 words) and a short
curriculum vitae (max. two pages) to both editors, before December 1,
2016:

– Karl Enenkel, Medieval and Early Modern Latin Philology, Westfälische
Wilhelms-Universität, Münster: kenen_01@uni-muenster.de
and
– Jan L. de Jong, History of Early Modern Art, Rijksuniversiteit
Groningen: j.l.de.jong@rug.nl

Applicants will be notified before January 1, 2017. Depending funding,
a conference with all authors is planned to take place in Münster, in
November 2017. Final chapters are due by February 1, 2018.

CFP: ‘Autodidacts, Workshops, Academies – Architectural Education 1400 -1850,’ Sixth Colloquium on Architectural Theory at the Werner Oechslin Library, Einsiedeln, April 20 – 23, 2017

800px-geometria_deutsch_08Call for Papers: Autodidacts, Workshops, Academies – Architectural Education 1400 -185o, Sixth Colloquium on Architectural Theory at the Werner Oechslin Library, Werner Oechslin Library, Einsiedeln, April 20 – 23, 2017
Deadline: 5 October 2016

Before the establishment of the major schools of architecture in the
nineteenth century, there were various ways to become an architect,
each with different focuses. A canonical system did not exist. Studies
based on books or travel, apprenticeships in workshops and studios, a
training in the military or building administration, as well as
academic lessons could all be part of the education of a prospective
architect. A talent for drawing was always a prerequisite, as were the
economic possibilities of the surroundings. Aspiring to a secure
position in the military or administration motivated the young
candidates, and family connections and knowledge fostered their
development. Furthermore, beginning in the 17th century, textbooks were
published specifically for the needs of the students. This gradually
led to the consolidation of formats and didactic conditions for
training architects, including (teaching) collections that made
available illustrative material – similar to the artists’ training for
sculptors or painters.

Research to date has focused primarily on architectural training in the
art academies, yet beyond this, no overview considers the other
relevant domains. At this upcoming event, the numerous paths to
knowledge and the varied acquisition of competencies will be presented
and compared in individual studies and analyses. Relying closely on
historical sources, the contributions will enable us to form a general
outline of the topic.

The event addresses architectural theoreticians, architects, art
historians, historians of technology and science, and others, and seeks
to bring together leading experts on the topics as well as, in
particular, young researchers from various countries.

Papers should be limited to twenty-minute presentations.

Languages for paper proposals and presentations: German, English,
French, Italian.  At least a passive knowledge of German is expected of
all participants.

The Foundation assumes the hotel costs for course participants, as well
as for some group meals. Travel costs cannot be reimbursed.

How to Submit: Please send short paper proposals and CVs by e-mail to:
anja.buschow@bibliothek-oechslin.ch

CFP: Publishing in the Renaissance – Minor and Academic publishers

hypnerotomachia-poliphili_1Call for Journal Submissions: Kunsttexte – Renaissance 2016: “Publishing in the Renaissance – Minor and Academic publishers”
Deadline: Nov 1, 2016

Some major publishers dominated the publishing scene in the
Renaissance, like Aldo Manuzio and his family in Venice, and the Giunti
family in Florence. From early on however there were many minor
publishers, often very engaged, but successful only for a few years.
These were often intellectuals, who followed special interests in their
publishing policy. In Florence there was Anton Francesco Doni, member
of the literary academy, who published his own works, but also those of
his academy fellows, for example the lessons they presented in the
Academy. His engagement did not lead to financial success and after a
few years he had to stop. In Venice Francesco Sansovino was a
likeminded, who published his own works as well and those of his
friends, and some literary editions. There are numerous examples of
private engagement in printing. We invite papers, which present in an
exemplary way minor printers in the Renaissance (in Italy, France,
Spain, Germany), concentrating on their formation, their printing
policy, their outreach and influence.

How to submit: The articles are due on November 1, 2016, but a short note of interest
would be welcome beforehand.  Papers are welcome in German, English,
French, Italian or Spanish. For more information about the open access
online journal Kunsttexte and for the author guidelines please look at
www.kunsttexte.de.
Please send inquiries and proposals to
Angela Dressen (adressen@itatti.harvard.edu)
Susanne Gramatzki (gramatz@uni-wuppertal.de)