Tag Archives: humanism

Arte, Architettura e Umanesimo a Bologna, 1446-1530 (Bologna, 13-15 Jun 2018)

humanism, bolognaBologna (Italia), June 13 – 15, 2018

Dipartimento delle Arti, Complesso di S. Cristina, piazzetta G. Morandi 2 – Bologna

Bologna non è unanimemente riconosciuta come una delle capitali dell’Umanesimo, al pari di Firenze e Padova. Tuttavia la qualità delle scelte operate in campo artistico sottintende un rinnovamento culturale che gli studi moderni hanno cominciato a indagare. Da sempre crocevia di esperienze, anche nel Rinascimento Bologna riuscì a produrre e attrarre talenti d’eccellenza che seppero naturalizzarsi nel contesto cittadino e ricavarne nuovi spunti di riflessione e di creazione. Ne nacque, anche grazie all’ambiziosa magnificenza del clan bentivolesco e alla perdurante vitalità dell’antico Studium, una civiltà figurativa, architettonica e letteraria omogenea e ben connotata, capace di muoversi tra stravaganze eccentriche e punte di rustica classicità. Un processo che non si interruppe nemmeno dopo la traumatica cacciata degli stessi Bentivoglio, ma che anzi toccò un apice nel 1530, quando la solenne incoronazione di Carlo V riportò Bologna al centro della scena continentale.
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Last conference places: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650

quadfromgateConference: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650, residential conference at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 6-9 September 2017
Register by 3 September

Corpus Christi College, Oxford was founded on humanistic principles in 1517.  Its fellows included specially-appointed lecturers in Latin literature, Greek and Theology and its new trilingual library featured works in Latin, Greek and Hebrew.  Throughout the long sixteenth century, Corpus was a major centre of learning and religion: it played host to the Spanish humanist, Juan Luis Vives and the German astronomer and mathematician, Nicholas Kratzer; its fellows included the Catholic reformer Reginald Pole and the Protestant thinkers John Jewel and Richard Hooker; it played a prominent part in the production of the King James Bible.  In the College’s 500th anniversary year, we are holding a conference to discuss the wider context and implications of this remarkable foundation, exploring the inter-connected worlds of learning and education, prelacy and public service, charity and communal life, religion, literature and the arts, in Oxford and beyond, during a two hundred-year period of Renaissance and Reformation.

The programme includes papers from Susan Brigden, Clive Burgess, Jeremy Catto, Paul Cavill, Alexandra Gajda, Anthony Grafton, Lucy Kaufman, Nicholas Hardy, Pamela King, Julian Reid, Richard Rex, Miri Rubin, David Rundle, Christopher Stray, Joanna Weinberg, Magnus Williamson, and William Whyte.  A round table of Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Heal and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by Keith Thomas, will bring proceedings to a close.

Details are available here: Conference Programme.

Booking is now open: please click here Renaissance College Conference.

If you have any questions about your booking, please feel free to contact kerry.atkinson@ccc.ox.ac.uk.  For any queries about the content of the conference, please contact john.watts@ccc.ox.ac.uk.

 

CFP: After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517

St. Anne’s College, Oxford, 28-30 June 2017

An international conference organised by the Faculty of English, University of Oxford, this event builds on the success of the 2009 Oxford conference, After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century England, which resulted in a book of essays (ed. by Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh) that vigorously interrogated the nature of religious and intellectual culture in England in the long fifteenth century. After Chichele adopts a similar investigative and interdisciplinary approach. The period has been chosen precisely because the inner workings of English intellectual and religious life during these years have proved challengingly resistant to the formation of grand critical narratives. What are the chief currents driving the intellectual and cultural life of the church in England during this period? What happened to intellectual questioning during the period, and where did the Church’s cultural life express itself most vividly? What significant parochial, regional, national and international influences were brought to bear on English literate practices? In order to address these questions, the conference will adopt an interdisciplinary focus, inviting contributions from historians, literary scholars, and scholars working on the theology, ecclesiastical history, music and art of the period, and it is expected that a wide range of literary and cultural artefacts will be considered, from single-authored works to manuscript compilations, from translations to original works, and from liturgy to art and architecture, with no constraints as to the conference’s likely outcomes and conclusions. It is intended that the conference should generate a volume of essays similar to After Arundel in scope, ambition and quality.

Plenary speakers: David Carlson, Mary Erler, Sheila Lindenbaum, Julian Luxford, David Rundle, Cathy Shrank.

Possible topics for discussion:
Religious writing and the English Church; the emergence of humanism and the fate of scholasticism; literature and the law; cultural and ecclesiastical patronage; developments in art and architecture; the liturgical life of the Church; the impact of the international book trade and of print; palaeography and codicology; the Church’s role in education, colleges and chantries; the impact of travel and pilgrimage.

Please send 500 word abstracts (for proposed 20-minute papers) by Friday, 12th August 2016 to Vincent Gillespie, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA (vincent.gillespie@ell.ox.ac.uk).