Tag Archives: Conference

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting400crop.jpegConference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed.

PROGRAMME

9:30 – 10:00 Registration & Coffee
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome
SECTION I: Ancient and Medieval Collections

(Chair: Cecily Hennessy, Christie’s Education)

10:15 – 10:40 Collecting liturgical objects in thirteenth and fourteenth-century Castile

Maeve O’Donnell-Morales (Courtauld Institute of Art)

10:40 – 11:05 The saint-king’s collection: The treasure of grande châsse in the Sainte-Chapelle

Emily Guerry (University of Kent)

11:05 – 11:30 ‘Through me rulers rule’: A Curious History of Imperial Coronation Regalia

Zoë Opačić (Birkbeck, University of London)

11:30 – 11:55 E.P. Warren, Greek art and the Pan Painter

Amy Smith (University of Reading)

11:55 – 12:10 Discussion
12:10 – 13:40 LUNCH
SECTION II: New Approaches to Collections

(Chair: Sadie Pickup, Christie’s Education) 

13:45 – 14:10 The Digital Pilgrim Project: approaching large collections of miniature art

Amy Jeffs (University of Cambridge)

14:10 – 14:35 From Monastic Libraries to Computer Screens: Collecting Late Antique Illumination through the Centuries

Peter Toth (British Library)

14:35 – 15:00 Collections, Controversies and the Copts: Deciphering the Late Antique Textiles of Egypt

Anna Kelley (University of Birmingham)

15:00 – 15:15 Discussion
15:15 – 15:45 COFFEE & TEA
SECTION III: Private and Public Collections

(Chair: Jana Gajdošová, Christie’s Education)

15:50 – 16:15 The intersection between collecting and scholarship: some personal experience

Michael Carter (English Heritage)

16:15 – 16:40 Exploring the Collection of George R Harding

Naomi Speakman (British Museum)

16:40 – 17:05 Title to be Confirmed

Claudio Corsi (Christie’s, London)

17:05 – 17:15 Discussion
17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks
18:00 Drinks Reception

Conference: The Courtauld’s 22nd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium: Medieval Collaborations

cfp-imageSaturday 4 February 2017
10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Kenneth Clark Lecture, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN,

The traditional art-historical concern of attribution of works of art to specific masters has given way to more nuanced approaches to the artistic production of the Middle Ages that focus on collaborative working practices. Collaborations like that of Simone Martini and Lippo Memmi, the illuminators of the Winchester Bible, or the creators of Opus Anglicanum reveal a complex picture of artistic co-operation. Notions of the single commanding master have been replaced with collaborative artisan activity across disparate media, from the early-medieval cloister to the increasing specialisation of the late-medieval shop.

The Courtauld Institute’s 22nd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider new approaches to artistic collaborations of the Middle Ages, and how conceptions of collaboration have impacted on the study of these works.

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers the opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and promote their research.

Organised by Meg Bernstein (The Courtauld Institute of Art Kress Fellow 2015-7 / University of California, Los Angeles) and Imogen Tedbury (The Courtauld Institute of Art / National Gallery) with the generous support of The Sackler Research Forum.

Programme
09.30 – 10.00 Registration

10.00 – 10.10 Welcome

Session 1: Networks in collaboration. Chaired by Sophie Kelly (University of Kent)

10.10 – 10.30
Maeve O’Donnell-Morales, The Courtauld Institute of Art
It Took a Village: Collaborations at the Medieval Altar between Donors, Artists and Clerics

10.30 – 10.50
Aude Chevalier, Paris Nanterre Université
Collaborations in medieval copperware craftsmanship: the case study of French copper alloy censers (11th-17th centuries)

10.50 – 11.10
Maggie S. Crosland, The Courtauld Institute of Art
Commission as Collaboration: Untangling Agency in the Book of Hours of Philip the Bold

11.10 – 11.30
Discussion

11.30 – 12.00
TEA / COFFEE BREAK

Session 2: Artists in collaboration. Chaired by Lydia Hansell

12.00 – 12.20
Eowyn Kerr-Di Carlo, The Courtauld Institute of Art
Santa Maria degli Angeli or not? Considering Florentine artistic networks and the painter-illuminators of Fitzwilliam MS 30

12.20 – 12.40
Eleonora Cagol, Technische Universität Dresden
The workshop of Jörg Arzt and Jörg Feiss: winged altarpieces as evidence of artistic collaboration in South Tyrol at the end of the Middle Ages

12.40 – 13.00
Bryan C. Keene, The J. Paul Getty Museum / The Courtauld Institute of Art
Pacino / Pacinesque: Collaborative Choir Book Commissions in Early Trecento Florence

13.00 – 13.20

Discussion

13.20 – 14.30

LUNCH (speakers only)

Session 3: Collaborating across media. Chaired by Teresa Lane

14.30 – 14.50
Ella Beaucamp, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich
A joint venture from Venice: Medieval rock-crystal miniatures

14.50 – 15.10
Marie Quillent, University of Picardy Jules Verne
Artistic Collaboration in Medieval Funeral Sculpture in the North of France: the Tomb of Adrien de Hénencourt in the Cathedral of Amiens

15.10 – 15.30
Amanda Hilliam, National Gallery / Oxford Brookes University
Carlo Crivelli and the Goldsmith’s Art: shared aesthetics and technologies

15.30 – 15.50

Discussion

15.50 – 16.20

BREAK

Session 4: Collaborating across time. Chaired by Miguel Ayres DeCampos

16.20 – 16.40
Esther Dorado-Ladera, Independent Scholar
Reuse of Hispanic Muslim architecture during the Middle Ages: Christian interventions in the Aljaferia Palace

16.40 – 17.00
Oliver Mitchell, The Courtauld Institute of Art
Collaboration and conflict in Hugo de Folieto’s Liber de rotae religionis et simulationis

17.00 – 17.20
Costanza Beltrami, The Courtauld Institute of Art
Building and rebuilding the cloister of Segovia Cathedral (1436-1530): collaborations across space and time

17.20 – 17.50

Discussion

17.50 – 18.00
Closing remarks: Joanna Cannon (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

18.00
RECEPTION

View conference programme here.

Conf: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era, University of Birmingham, 24-25 February 2017

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Conference: 
Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era
University of Birmingham
24-25 February 2017

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

24 Feb 2017 – 1st day
14.00-14.10 – Opening remarks: prof Leslie Brubaker, University of Birmingham
14.10-15.00 First Keynote lecture and discussion: Dr Cecily Hilsdale, McGill University, Title TBC
15.00-16.00 First panel – Chair Dr Ruth Macrides, University of Birmingham
Ivana Jevtic: Late Byzantine Painting Reconsidered: Art in Decline or Art in the Age of Decline?
Andrew Griebeler: The Greek Botanical Albums in Late Byzantine and Early Ottoman Constantinople
Maria Alessia Rossi: Political ruin or spiritual renewal? Early Palaiologan art in context
16.00-16.20 Discussion
16.30-16.50 Coffee break
17.00-17.50 Second Keynote lecture and discussion: prof Niels Gaul, University of Edinburgh: Palaiologan Byzantium(s): East Rome’s Final Two Centuries in Recent Research
18.00-19.00 Reception

25 Feb 2017 – 2nd day
9.00-9.50 Opening keynote lecture and discussion: Dr Angeliki Lymberopoulou, Open University, Palaiologan art from regional Crete: artistic decline or social progress?
10.00 -10.40 Second panel – Chair Dr Daniel Reynolds, University of Birmingham Anđela Gavrilović: The Stylistic Features of the Frescoes of the Church of the Mother of God Hodegetria in the Patriarchate of Peć (c. 1335-1337)
Ludovic Bender: Mistra and its countryside: The transformation of the late Byzantine religious landscape of Laconia
10.40-11.00 Discussion
11.00-11.20 Coffee break
11.30-12.30 Third Panel – Chair Dr Francesca Dell’Acqua, University of Birmingham Andrea Mattiello: Who’s that man? The perception of Byzantium in 15th century Italy
Tatiana Bardashova: Palaiologan Influence on the Visual Representation of the Grand Komnenoi in the Empire of Trebizond (1204-1461)
Lilyana Yordanova: The Issues of Visual Narrative, Literary Patronage and Display of Virtues of a Bulgarian Tsar in the Fourteenth century
12.30-12.50 Discussion
13.00-14.00 Lunch break

Workshop
14.10-14.50 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
14.50-15.30 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
15.40-16.00 Coffee break
16.10-16.50 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
16.50-17.00 Closing remarks: Andrea Mattiello/Maria Alessia Rossi

The programme, further information and details of how to book can be found at:

and
http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/bomgs/events/2017/reconsidering-palaiologan-arts.aspx

CFP: 14th International Medieval Society Symposium: ‘Evil,’ Paris, June 29– July 1, 2016

ambrogio_lorenzetti_008Call for Papers: 14th International Medieval Society Symposium: ‘Evil,’ Paris, June 29– July 1, 2016
Deadline:
November 5, 2016

For its 14th Annual Symposium, the International Medieval Society invites abstracts on the theme of Evil in the Middle Ages. The concept of evil, and the tensions it reveals about the relationship between internal and external identities, fits well into recent trends in scholarship that have focused attention on medieval bodies, boundaries, and otherness. Medieval bodies frequently blur the distinctions between moral and non-moral evil. External, monstrous appearances are often seen as testament to internal dispositions, and illnesses might be seen as a reflection of a person’s evil nature. More generally, evil may stand in for an entire, contrasting ideological viewpoint, as much as for a particular kind of behaviour, action, or being. It may appear in the world through intentional acts, as well as through accidental occurrences, through demonic intervention as much as through human weakness and sin. It may be rooted in anger, spread through violence, or thrive on ignorance, emerging from either the natural world or from mankind.

Alongside those working on bodies and monstrosity, the question of evil has also preoccupied scholars working to understand the limits of moral responsibility and the links between destiny and decision as shown in medieval literary, artistic and historical productions. The 14th Annual IMS Symposium on Evil aims to focus on the many facets of medieval evil, analysing the intersections between evil as concept and form, as well as taking into account medieval responses to evil and its potential effects.

This Symposium will thus explore (but is not limited to) three broad themes:

1)    Concepts of evil: discourse on morality and moral understandings of evil; reflections on the relationship between good and evil; heresy and heretical beliefs, teachings, writings; evil and sin; evil and conscience; associations with hell, the devil; types of evil behaviour or evil thoughts; categories of evil; evil as disorder/chaos; evil as corruption; evil and mankind

2)    Embodied evil/being evil/evil beings: monstrosity; the demonic; perceptions of deformity and disfigurement; evil transformations and metamorphoses; magic and the supernatural; outward expressions of evil (e.g. through clothing, material possessions); evil objects

3)    Responses to evil: punishments; the purging and/or exorcism of evil; inquisition; evil speech; warnings about evil (textual, visual, musical); ways to avoid evil or to protect oneself (talismans etc.); the temptation of evil; emotional responses to evil; social exclusion as a response to evil.

Through these broad themes, we aim to encourage the participation of researchers with varying backgrounds and fields of expertise: historians, art historians, musicologists, philologists, literary specialists, and specialists in the auxiliary sciences (palaeographers, epigraphists, codicologists, numismatists). While we focus on medieval France, compelling submissions focused on other geographical areas that also fit the conference theme are welcome and encouraged. By bringing together a wide variety of papers that both survey and explore this field, the IMS Symposium intends to bring a fresh perspective to the notion of evil in medieval culture.

How to submit: Proposals of no more than 300 words (in English or French) for a 20-minute paper should be e-mailed to communications.ims.paris@gmail.com by November 5th 2016. Each should be accompanied by full contact information, a CV, and a list of the audio-visual equipment that you require.

Please be aware that the IMS-Paris submissions review process is highly competitive and is carried out on a strictly anonymous basis. The selection committee will email applicants in late-November to notify them of its decision. Titles of accepted papers will be made available on the IMS-Paris website. Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fee (35 euros, reduced for students, free for IMS-Paris members).

The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary, bilingual (French/English) organisation that fosters exchanges between French and foreign scholars. For the past ten years, the IMS has served as a centre for medievalists who travel to France to conduct research, work, or study. For more information about the IMS-Paris and past symposia programmes, please visit our website: www.ims-paris.org.

IMS-Paris Graduate Student Prize:

The IMS-Paris is pleased to offer one prize for the best paper proposal by a graduate student. Applications should consist of:

1) a symposium paper abstract

2) an outline of a current research project (PhD. dissertation research)

3) the names and contact information of two academic referees

The prize-winner will be selected by the board and a committee of honorary members, and will be notified upon acceptance to the Symposium. An award of 350 euros to support international travel/accommodation (within France, 150 euros) will be paid at the Symposium.

Conference: Al-Murābiṭūn: Noveno centenario del esplendor de un Imperio, Granada, October 19-22, 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAConference: Al-Murābiṭūn: Noveno centenario del esplendor de un Imperio, Granada, October 19-22, 2016
Inscription deadline: October 17, 2016.

The Universidad Internacional de Andalucía and the Escuela de la Alhambra present “Al-Murābiṭūn: Noveno centenario del esplendor de un Imperio,” a colloquium/ course in honor of the memory of Prof. Henri Terrasse, to he held 19-22 October 2017 at the Palace of Carlos V in the Alhambra (Granada).

2016 is the 900th anniversary of the conquest of the Balearic islands by the Almoravids (1116), an event which corresponded to the greatest territorial expansion of their empire and started the moment of its maximum splendor. With the occupation of the Islands, the empire obtained a vast territory extending from Mauritania to Zaragoza, as since the end of the 11th century they had been gaining power over the taifas of Al-Andalus, becoming the most important empire of Western Islam during the first half of the 12th century. They were the first to unite the two sides of the Strait of Gibraltar under the same political and religious power. This fact enabled a lively social, commercial and cultural exchange between Al-Andalus and North Africa, centered around the great capitals of the Empire, especially the North African Marrakech, and the peninsular Granada.

Moreover, this year marks 45 years since the death of Professor Henri Terrasse, a great scholar of the art of Morocco and Al-Andalus. Among his works are several publications dedicated to the art and arquitecture of Al-Andalus, necessary starting points for anyone interested in pursuing research in these fields.
During this international seminar, several specialists of the Almoravides will commemorate the 900th centernary of the apogee of the greater Western Islamic empire, with a special attention to the legacy of Henri Terrasse.

PROGRAMME
1a JORNADA: miércoles 19 de octubre
10:00 a 10:15 – Presentación
10:15 a 11:15 – Conferencia inaugural.
“Henri Terrasse y su contribución historiográfi ca”
D. Rafael LÓPEZ GUZMÁN (Universidad de Granada). 11:15 a 11:30 – Pausa-café

Sesión de mañana:
MESA 1.- Origen, génesis y evolución del Imperio almorávide
11:30 a 12:30
“Camelleros saharianos: la caracterización de los almorávides en las fuentes”
D.a Helena DE FELIPE (Universidad de Alcalá).
12:30 a 13:30
“El primer urbanismo de Marrakech”
D. Abdellatif MAROU (Conservador de la Inspección de Monumentos y Sitios Históricos de Marrakech, Ministerio de Cultura del Reino de Marruecos).
13:30 a 14:30
“El nacimiento del Califato almohade y el  fin de los almorávides. Introducción de un nuevo arte” D.a Dolores VILLALBA SOLA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisboa).
14:30 a 17:00- Almuerzo

Sesión de tarde:
MESA 2.- El Imperio almorávide: organización económica, política y jurisdicción
17:00 a 18:00
“La evolución de la organización política y administrativa del emirato almorávide al imperio almohade”
D. Pascal BURESI (CNRS, Lyon).
18:00 a 18:30- Pausa-café
[MESA 1.- Origen, génesis y evolución del Imperio almorávide]
18:30 a 19:30
“Historia de los almorávides a través de las fuentes textuales”
D.a Ma Jesús VIGUERA MOLINS (Universidad Complutense de Madrid).
19:30 a 20:00- Debate sesión de tarde

2a JORNADA: jueves 20 de octubre
Sesión de mañana

MESA 2 (b).- El Imperio almorávide: organización económica, política y jurisdicción 10:00 a 11:00
“Cadíes y cadiazgo andalusí en época almorávide”
D. Rachid EL HOUR (Universidad de Salamanca).
11:00 a 12:00
“La economía de los almorávides saharianos en el Sur de al-Andalus según sus indicios” D. Eduardo ESCARTÍN GONZÁLEZ (Universidad de Sevilla).
12:00 a 12:30 – Pausa-café
MESA 3.- Trabajos arqueológicos, conservación y difusión de la cultura material almorávide
12:30 a 13:30
“El registro arqueológico almorávide en Šarq al-Andalus: arquitectura y producciones cerámicas”
D. Pedro JIMÉNEZ CASTILLO (Escuela de Estudios Árabes – CSIC, Granada) y Manuel PÉREZ ASENSIO (Arqueólogo).
13:30 a 14:00 Debate sesión de mañana 14:00 a 17:00 – Almuerzo

Sesión de tarde
17:00 a 17:30
“La colección almorávide del Museo de la Alhambra: inventario y catálogo”
D.a Paula SÁNCHEZ GÓMEZ (Arqueóloga – Arquemus Medievalia S. L.) y Eva MORENO LEÓN (Arqueóloga – Arquemus Medievalia S. L.).
17:30 a 18:30
Visita a la colección del Museo de la Alhambra
D.a Paula SÁNCHEZ GÓMEZ (Arqueóloga – Arquemus Medievalia S. L.) y Eva MORENO LEÓN (Arqueóloga – Arquemus Medievalia S. L.).
18:30 a 19:00- Pausa-café
19:00 a 20:00
“Otra forma de enseñar la Historia”
D. Juan CASTILLA BRAZALES (Escuela de Estudios Árabes – CSIC, Granada).

3a JORNADA: viernes 21 de octubre
Sesión de mañana

MESA 4.- El arte y la cultura en la época almorávide: arquitectura, artes suntuarias y pensamiento estético
10:00 a 11:00
“La estética andalusí en el siglo XII”
D. José Miguel PUERTA VÍLCHEZ (Universidad de Granada).
11:00 a 12:00
“¿Existe un arte almorávide? Contribuciones y nuevas perspectivas”
D.a María MARCOS COBALEDA (Instituto de Estudos Medievais – FCSH/UNL, Lisboa).
12:00 a 12:30 – Pausa-café
12:30 a 13:30
“El Panteón Real del monasterio cisterciense de las Huelgas de Burgos. Historiografía, arqueología artística y modelo de conservación”
D.a Concha HERRERO CARRETERO (Patrimonio Nacional).
13:30 a 14:00 Debate sesión de mañana
14:00 a 17:00 – Almuerzo

Sesión de tarde
MESA 5.- Las civilizaciones coetáneas a los almorávides
17:00 a 18:00
“Toledo en el siglo XII: de la casa al barrio”
D. Jean PASSINI (LaDéHiS – CRH – EHESS, Paris).
18:00 a 18:30 – Pausa-café
18:30 a 19:30
“Relaciones entre musulmanes, judíos y cristianos en el Mediterráneo del siglo XII”
D. Brian A. CATLOS (University of Colorado, Boulder (EEUU) / The Mediterranean Seminar). 19:30 a 20:00 Debate sesión de tarde y conclusiones  nales

4a JORNADA: sábado 22 de octubre (opcional)
10:00 a 14:00
Visita al Palacio de Dar al-Horra, las murallas de la Alhacaba y el Bañuelo (personal de Huerto Alegre).

Time and place
El Seminario se celebrará en el Conjunto Monumental de la Alhambra y Generalife, en el Palacio de Carlos V, Granada.
Las clases tendrán lugar los días 19 al 22 de octubre de 2016, en horario de mañana y tarde (excepto el sábado 22 que será sólo de mañana).

How to apply:
Número de plazas y condiciones de admisión
El número de plazas es limitado, por lo que las solicitudes se atenderán por riguroso orden de matriculación.
La Universidad comunicará expresamente la matriculación del solicitante.
El seminario va dirigido fundamentalmente a alumnado universitario de los grados de Filología Árabe y Hebrea, Historia del Arte e Historia; medievalistas, arabistas y otros investigadores; guías e intérpretes; profesores de Instituto.

El plazo de matrícula  finaliza el 17 de octubre de 2016.
El importe es de 8 € de apertura de expediente.
Número de horas: 25.
El pago de la apertura de expediente deberá efectuarse por transferencia bancaria libre de gastos o por ingreso a la cuenta de La Caixa, O cina Isla de la Cartuja (Sevilla) IBAN: ES78 21009166752200074348

Formalización de la matrícula
Deberá aportarse la siguiente documentación:
1- Solicitud en el impreso que facilita la Universidad Internacional de Andalucía.
2- Fotocopia del DNI.
3- Justificante de haber abonado los derechos correspondientes.

CFPs: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017

tumblr_nid8xdrz0n1soj7s4o4_500Call for Papers: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017
Deadline: October 25, 2016

For more information on panels, round-tables, short presentations and working groups, and for submission guidelines, see: http://rarebookschool.org/bibliography-conference-2017/

Bibliography Among the Disciplines, a four-day international conference to be held in Philadelphia from 12 to 15 October 2017, will bring together scholarly professionals poised to address current problems pertaining to the study of textual artifacts that cross scholarly, pedagogical, professional, and curatorial domains. The conference will explore theories and methods common to the object-oriented disciplines, such as anthropology and archaeology, but new to bibliography. The Bibliography Among the Disciplines program, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to promote focused cross-disciplinary exchange and future scholarly collaborations. The conference sessions will include both traditional and innovative formats: plenary addresses, short presentations, roundtables, workshops, working groups, and site visits. Calls for Proposals and Participants (CFPs) are listed below. The project will culminate in 2019 with a volume of essays contributed by conference participants. The conference and subsequent volume will seek to build on the ongoing series of symposia conducted by Rare Book School’s Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography, established in 2012 through funding from the Foundation.

Call for Papers- Panels:

Graphic Representation: Illustration & Diagrams
Session Organizers: Claire Eager (University of Virginia), Jeannie Kenmotsu (University of Pennsylvania)

Textual Instruments
Session Organizer: Nick Wilding (Georgia State University)

Questions of Scale, Production & Labor
Session Organizer: Juliet Sperling (University of Pennsylvania)

Transmission & Transfer of Images
Session Organizer: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley

Degradation, Loss, Recovery & Fragmentation
Session Organizer: Jane Raisch (University of California, Berkeley)

Materiality of Digital Objects
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

The Social Life of Books: Uses of Text & Image Beyond Reading & Viewing
Session Organizers: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley), Hannah Marcus (Harvard University), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Books as Agents of Contact
Session Organizers: Hansun Hsiung (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science), András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Yael Rice (Amherst College)

Manuscript in the Age of Print
Session Organizers: Rachael King (University of California, Santa Barbara), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation
Session Organizer: Lauren Jennings (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Comparative Histories of the Book
Session Organizers: Megan McNamee (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Reappraising the Redundant: The Value of Copies in the Study of Textual Artifacts
Session Organizer: Kappy Mintie (University of California, Berkeley)n and

Call for Papers – Roundtables:

Performance, Textuality & Orality
Session Organizer: Glenda Goodman (University of Pennsylvania)

Authorship
Session Organizers: András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Digitization, Representation & Access
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

Materiality as a Sustainable Humanistic Discourse
Session Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Ethics & Responsibility in the Bibliosphere
Session Organizer: Claire Eager (University of Virginia)

 Call for papers – Short Presentations:

Tools for Data Analysis & Visualization
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

Innovative Pedagogy with Material Objects
Session Organizer: Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Teaching Global Book History
Session Organizers: Devin Fitzgerald (Harvard University) & Ben Nourse (University of Denver)

Dynamics of Digital Collections
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

The Book and Its Time: Developing a ‘Period Eye’
Session Organizer: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire (Winterthur Museum)

Call for Papers: Working Groups:

Globalizing Book History & Bibliography
Working Group Organizers: Hwisang Cho (Xavier University), Ben Nourse (University of Denver), Rachel Stein (Columbia University in the City of New York)

Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines
Working Group Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Courtney Roby (Cornell University)

 

CFP: Medieval Materialities: Encountering the Material Medieval, St Andrews, School of Art History/St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies, January 19 – 20, 2017

cskf7tovyaa3ku6-jpg_largeCall for Papers: Medieval Materialities: Encountering the Material Medieval, St Andrews, School of Art History/St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies, January 19 – 20, 2017
Deadline: November 15, 2016

The University of St Andrews School of Art History in collaboration
with the St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) present
Encountering the Material Medieval, the second edition of an
interdisciplinary conference on materiality and material engagements
with the medieval, taking place on 19-20 January 2017 in Scotland.

The academic year 2016-2017 looks like it is going to be the year of
modern medievalisms, with three conferences addressing how the medieval
fits into our modern world in the UK, France and the USA. While the
idea of medievalism directly impacts modern scholarship and culture at
large, it encourages an engagement with a theoretical abstraction of
the medieval culture. This way, the materiality of the sources, and the
intrinsic materiality of our embodied engagement with the medieval, is
neglected.

Beyond the digital humanities, we are interested in material
engagements with the medieval. This takes place in the library, where
we encounter manuscripts in an intimate, skin-to-skin contact; during
fieldwork, when we need to crouch in order to enter a medieval altar;
in one’s own kitchen, when we try to reproduce a recipe freshly
transcribed from a manuscript; or on the fairground, where we can hold
in our own hand a replica of medieval pottery.

We are dedicated to encouraging multi-mediality and non-traditional
presentation methods during the conference. Therefore, we invite
interactive presentations, installations and posters, workshop and
hands-on activities proposals (45-50 minutes), as well as papers (not
longer than 20 minutes) on the following range of topics and their
relationship to the study of materiality, physicality and embodiment
in/with the Middle Ages:
– The concept of materiality and physicality as research and teaching
methodology;
– Bringing the materiality of the medieval to the institution or the
wider public;
– Semiotics and anthropology of the material Middle Ages in modern or
medieval thought and practice;
– The human and non-human, material and embodied, materiality and
boundaries;
– Medieval to modern (dis)continuities in genealogy of material.
Papers and workshops on other issues related to the study of
materiality and physicality in the Middle Ages are also welcome.

How to submit: Please send your submissions (250 word abstract) along with a short
biography (max. 100 words) to medmat@st-andrews.ac.uk no later than
15th of November 2016.

For more info, visit our website Medievalmaterialities.wordpress.com
Find us on Twitter: @medievalmateriality and tweeting with #medmat17