Tag Archives: Conference

Conference Programme: “Women and Violence in the Late Medieval Mediterranean, ca. 1100-1500, 27 September 2019

The last decades have witnessed an increased interest in research on the relationship between women and violence in the Middle Ages, with new works both on female criminality and on women as victims of violence. The contributions of gender theory and feminist criminology have renewed the approached used in this type of research. Nevertheless, many facets of the complex relationship between women and violence in medieval times still await to be explored in depth. This conference aims to understand how far the roots of modern assumptions concerning women and violence may be found in the late medieval Mediterranean, a context of intense cultural elaboration and exchange which many scholars have indicated as the cradle of modern judicial culture. While dialogue across the Mediterranean was constant in the late Middle Ages, occasions for comparative discussion remain rare for modern-day scholars, to the detriment of a deeper understanding of the complexity of many issues. Thus, we encourage specialists of different areas across the Mediterranean (Western Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic world) to contribute to the discussion. What were the main differences and similarities? How did these change through time? What were the causes for change? Were coexisting assumptions linking femininity and violence conflicting or collaborating?

The conference will take place over two days thanks to the generous contributions of The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, the Maison Française d’Oxford, and the UMR Orient- Mediterranée Monde Byzantin.

Keynote speakers
Professor Carol Lansing (UC Santa Barbara)
Professor Élisabeth Malamut (Université de Provence)
Conclusion by Professor Annick Peters-Custot (Université de Nantes)

This event is free. To secure your place, please register here.

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CFP: International Meeting of the European Architectural History Network in Edinburgh in June 2020

Genius Loci: The Politics of Pre-Modern Architectural Style Session, International Meeting of the European Architectural History Network, Edinburgh, 10–13 June 2020

Frequently encountered in the historiography of pre-modern architecture is the theme of genius loci – a paradigm in which factors such as climate, local resources, and local traditions are understood as determinative for the building practices of a given region, country, or nation.

Writing on Gothic architecture is a striking case in point. The style was a pan-European phenomenon. Yet, almost from the beginning, it was interpreted in patently ethnic, regional, or national terms. Late medieval observers in northern Europe saw it as French (opus francigenum). Early modern observers in southern Europe saw it as German (maniera tedesca). And antiquarians, archaeologists, and architectural historians active during the era of the formation of modern nation states, in an effort to advance competing domestic claims to Gothic, coined a series of stylistic labels – ‘Perpendicular’ for England, ‘Flamboyant’ for France, ‘Sondergotik’ for Germany – that continue to be employed into the present day.

Thus have medieval architectural historians struggled to examine the buildings of smaller regions with more heterogeneous architectural traditions. Scotland – a land whose medieval edifices have been characterised as ‘dour’, ’embattled’, and even a ‘fag-end’ – is exemplary in this regard. Smaller buildings less sympathetic to foreign fashions have typically been viewed as crude. Larger buildings more sympathetic to foreign fashions have typically been viewed as mannered, wilful, or downright bizarre (cf. Roslin Chapel). Such interpretations not only uphold a simplistic centre-versus-periphery model of historical explanation but also assume that national styles are real ontic categories.

Raising the stakes for a re-evaluation of issues of place, space, and identity is the politically febrile atmosphere in which we now live and work. Indeed, nativism draws on the idea that countries have distinctive (if not inviolable) cultures, and architecture plays a dual role in such discourse in that old buildings can be used as evidence for certain values and new buildings can be used as vehicles for certain ideologies. Consequently, this panel seeks to interrogate the relationship between architecture and regional or national identities in the pre-modern period, with an emphasis on the buildings of medieval Scotland. Possible topics for papers include:

– Definitions of nationalism

– Investigations of ‘schools’, ‘groups’, and/or ‘styles’

– Attributions of buildings to various regional or national idioms

– Explorations of social networks that supported or subverted the exchange of architectural ideas

Please submit a proposal in English of no more than 300 words by 20 September 2019 to Zachary Stewart (zstewart@arch.tamu.edu) and Lizzie Swarbrick (Lizzie.Swarbrick@ed.ac.uk) with the following information:

– The title of the paper

– Your name

– Your professional affiliation

– A short curriculum vitae (maximum of two pages)

– A mailing address, email address and telephone number

Please note: papers may not have been previously published, nor presented in public. Only one submission per author will be accepted by EAHN 2020. Each speaker is expected to fund his or her own registration, travel and expenses to Edinburgh.

Conference: Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages, St Andrews Uni, 13-14 September 2019

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages will take place at the University of St Andrews on 13-14 September 2019, and is jointly held by the School of Art History, SAIMS and the University’s Special Collections Division. Please send all queries to medievalarchive@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Friday 13 September  [Venue: Napier Reading Room, Martyrs Kirk, North Street]

14:00 Emily Savage: word of welcome

14:15 Rachel Hart (University of St Andrews Library, Special Collections): “The surviving evidence of medieval collecting, curating and assembling to be found in the Library of the University of St Andrews”

15:00-16:00: Handling session in Special Collections with Rachel Hart

17:15: Keynote lecture: Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) [Venue: School 3 on the Quad]:

“History in the Making: Categories, Techniques and Chronology in Church Collections, c. 800-1300”

18:30: Conference dinner [Venue TBA]

 

Saturday 14 Sept [Venue for all sessions: Parliament Hall, South Street]

8:30-9: Coffee

9:00-10:45 Morning session  1: Relics and reliquaries – Chair: Kate Rudy

Juliette Calvarin (Harvard University): “Afterlives of Funeral Palls in the Sacristy (St. Thomas’, Prague, c. 1410)”

Ashley West (Temple University): “Heiltumsbücher and Artistic Authority in an Early Visual Archive”

Sarina Kursteiner (Columbia University): “Notarial Acts as Sacred Matter: Bolognese Notaries and their Images in the Archive, 1290-1303”

10:45-11: Coffee and comfort break

11:00-12:45 Morning session  2: Treasuries – Chair: Emily Savage

Elizabeth Mattison (University of Toronto): “Reflecting a Golden Age: The Material Composition of History in the Treasuries of the Late Medieval Maasland”

Marta Simões & Joana Antunes (CEAACP-GEMA, University of Coimbra): “Reading the Space, Listing the Riches: The Old Cathedral of Coimbra and its Medieval Inventories”

Zachary Stewart (Texas A&M University): “The St Peter Mancroft Inventory: Register, Record, Teaching Resource”

12:45- 2:00 Lunch

14:00-15:45: Afternoon session 1: Manuscripts as Archives – Chair: Julian Luxford

Kathleen Wilson Ruffo (Royal Ontario Museum): “Curating Cultural Capital: A little-known Dutch Psalter as Diplomatic Archive”

Shannon Wearing (UCLA): “The ‘Eternal Memory of Great Things’: Illustrated Secular Cartularies of the Twelfth Century,from Bavaria to Barcelona”

Orly Amit (Tel Aviv University): “Appropriating the Archive: Promoting Legitimacy and Shaping Historical Memory through the Library of John of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford”

15:45-16:00 Coffee and comfort break

16:00-17:45: Afternoon session 2: Storing the Archive  Chair: Rachel Hart

Diego Belmonte-Fernandez (Universidad de Sevilla): “Collecting, curating and remembering in the Cathedral of Seville: a portable written archive from the fifteenth century”

Rafael Ceballos-Roa & María del Carmen Rodríguez-López (Universidad de León): “The B-side of the parchment: two medieval monastic archives from the kingdom of León”

Amélie Marineau-Pelletier (University of Ottawa and École des hautes études en sciences sociales): “The Locus Credibilis and the Making of Urban Authority: Preserving the Written Word in Metz (14th-15th Centuries)”

Ending around 18:00

BAA Post-Graduate Conference – Saturday 23rd November 2019

Join us for the first British Archaeological Association Post-graduate Conference.

We are excited to present a diverse conference which includes postgraduates and early career researchers in the fields of medieval history of art, architecture, and archaeology.

The BAA postgraduate conference offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present their research and exchange ideas with fellow members of the BAA.

 

Tickets:

  • BAA Student Member Ticket – Free
  • Student Ticket – £5.00
  • Non-Student Ticket – £10.00

Get your tickets here: https://baapostgradconf.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

Conference Programme

9:30am – 9:50am – Registration

 

9:50am – 10:00am – Welcome

 

10:00am – 11:20am – Cultural imagination and Identity

Chair: Professor Sandy Heslop, University of East Anglia

Ryan Low (Harvard University)Seeing Identity in Crusader Colonial Ceramics

Netta Clavner (Birkbeck University of London)Defining Social Order: The Civic Scene of Medieval Bristol

Lily Hawker-Yates (Christ Church Canterbury University)Interpretations of Barrows in Later Medieval England

 

11:20am – 11:40am – Refreshment Break

 

11:40 am – 12:40pm – Landscape and Urban Space 

Chair: Dr Alexandra Gajewski, The Burlington Magazine/Institute of Historical Research, London

Dana Katz (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)The Lake Effect: An Environmental Case Study of Landscape Transformation at the Royal Parkland of La Favara in Medieval Sicily

Richard Nevell (University of Exeter)The Archaeology of Destruction in the Middle Ages

 

12:40pm -13:40pm – Lunch (provided)

 

13:45pm – 15:00pm – Iconography and Interpretation

Chair: Dr Emily Guerry, University of Kent

Dustin S. Aaron (Institute of Fine Arts, New York University)Revisiting the Meaning of Mouths on the Austro-Bavarian Frontier

Innocent Smith, op (Universität Regensburg)Representatio Representationis: Depictions of the Mass in 13th-century Missals

Muriel Araujo Lima (University of São Paulo)Sinful Nature: Creation Cycles, Moralizing Content and Figurative Exegesis in Medieval Bestiaries

 

15:00pm – 15:15pm – Refreshment Break

 

15:15pm – 16:15pm – Visualising the Cult of Saints

Chair: Professor Michael Michael, Research Fellow, School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow

Angela Websdale (University of Kent), The Cult of Saint Edward the Confessor and the Influence of Westminster Palace and Henry III’s Maison Dieu at Ospringe upon the Gothic Wall Paintings in Faversham

Katie Toussaint-Jackson (University of Kent)The Wall Paintings of Horsham St Faith and their Medieval Modifications

 

16:15pm – 16:30pm – Comfort Break

 

16:30pm – 17:45pm – Sculptures and Masons: Artistic agency, patronage and construction

Chair: John McNeill, Hon. Secretary, BAA

Aurora Corio (University of Genova)Lombard Sculptors in Western Tuscany at the heart of the Duecento: The case of St. Martino in Lucca

Teresa Martínez (Instituto de Historia, CCHS-CSIC/ University of Warwick)The petrification of Zamora: A specific answer to general questions about Construction and Society in the Middle Ages.

 

17:45pm – 18:00pm – Closing Remarks

 

NB: We will be providing a light lunch and refreshments to all attending. Please let us know if you have any dietary requirements: postgradconf@thebaa.org

Tickets:

  • BAA Student Member Ticket – Free
  • Student Ticket – £5.00
  • Non-Student Ticket – £10.00

Get your tickets here: https://baapostgradconf.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

CFP: BAA Post-Graduate Conference, Saturday 23rd November 2019 (Deadline: 6th May 2019)

The BAA invites proposals by postgraduates and early career researchers in the field of medieval history of art, architecture, and archaeology.

Papers can be on any aspect of the medieval period, from antiquity to the later Middle Ages, across all geographical regions.

The BAA postgraduate conference offers an opportunity for postgraduate students and early career researchers at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and discuss their research, and exchange ideas.

Proposals of around 250 words for a 20-minute paper, along with a CV, should be sent by 6th May 2019 to postgradconf@thebaa.org

 

BAA call for papers

CFP: St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference (6-8 June, 2019)

St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference

6 – 8 June, 2019

Deadline: 31 March, 2019

K104208

The British Library, Egerton 2899, Psalter of the Gallican Version, Scotland, 15th century, f. 30, detail.

We are announcing a call for papers for the second St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) Graduate Conference. This three-day conference is aimed at graduate students and early career researchers in any area of Medieval Studies. The second day of the conference will be devoted to the theme Politics and Political Thought and we would particularly welcome abstracts related to this topic from scholars working in any of the fields mentioned below. We aim to encompass a range of historical perspectives, from art to archeology, law to literature.

The keynote addresses will be delivered by Professor Carole Hillenbrand (Edinburg & St Andrews) and Dr Charles West (Sheffield).

Proposals relating to the following fields of research are especially welcome:

  • Eastern Mediterranean studies
  • Art and architecture
  • The church and religious life
  • Crusading
  • Late Antiquity
  • Latin poetry
  • Law
  • Middle Eastern studies
  • Philosophy
  • Rulership and lordship
  • Scottish history
  • Texts and manuscripts

It is anticipated that there shall be no registration free and that some travel bursaries will be available. Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes in length.

Please email 250-word abstracts to saimsgraduateconference@gmail.com by 31st March 2019.

CONF: Remembering the Middle Ages? Reception, Identity, Politics

Conference & Poetry Reading: Remembering the Middle Ages?

April 5-6, 2019

2 Locations:

Bush House, Aldwych, King’s College London
The London Global Gateway, 1-4 Suffolk Street, University of Notre Dame

A partnership between the University of Notre Dame (London Global Gateway) and King’s College London, ‘Remembering the Middle Ages? Reception, Identity, Politics’ asks speakers and attendees to consider how the concept of a ‘cultural memory’ of the Middle Ages can be useful (or not) in understanding how and why scholars, artists, readers, and others have resourced or imagined the Middle Ages, in any post-medieval period. We ask participants to interrogate the linguistic, material, and social networks that have been created by medieval things over time. Haruko Momma (University of Toronto) and Sarah Salih (King’s College London) will give a keynote panel, and the event also includes a reading featuring poets Vahni Capildeo and Ian Duhig and chaired by Professor Clare Lees (Director of the Institute for English Studies). Further details are forthcoming at our website: http://sites.nd.edu/remembering-the-middle-ages.

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