Tag Archives: Theology

CFP: Leo Steinberg’s Sexuality of Christ Revisited (New Orleans, 22-24 Mar 18)

steinbergNew Orleans, Louisiana, USA, March 22 – 24, 2018
Deadline: May 10, 2017

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, 22 (Thursday) -24 (Saturday) March  ’18

Leo Steinberg’s Sexuality of Christ Revisited

Despite the controversy that it provoked more than thirty years ago, Leo Steinberg’s insight about ostentatio genitalium has become almost a commonplace.  Through that motif, Steinberg claimed, artists created what was prominently preached from roughly 1400 to 1600, a theology of palpable Incarnationism.  Critics countered variously: Textual evidence supporting his conclusion was weak.  Treatment of sexuality was too narrowly male.  The visual evidence itself was too inconsistent and unconvincing.  Others simply found the entire subject discomforting.

Today among Renaissance specialists Steinberg’s insight is more invoked than examined, though new reasons to interrogate it have emerged. Medievalists have called attention to the nudity of Christ in earlier centuries.  The body of Christ was not just a penis.  The relationship between the religious and the sensuous is an increasingly vibrant subject of research.  Studies of sexuality and gender have become more finely granular.  In contrast to the parochially western Christian and Greco-Latin perspectives that have heretofore dominated, specialists have started to incorporate other ancient influences, notably Egyptian, as well as interactions within all-Christendom and between it and Judaism/ Islam.  The lives of the great art historians have been explored to offer insight into their scholarship.  Provocative and wide-ranging proposals integrating these and related approaches are welcome.

Proposals (MS Word attachment ONLY — no PDF or Google Doc) submitted to Benjamin Braude <Braude@bc.edu>, before 10 May, must include name and affiliation, short title (15 word max), abstract (150 word max), cv (not in prose, 300 word max), e-address, cell and land line numbers, keywords, as well as scheduling and a-v needs.  To participate one must be a member of the RSA.

New Publications: The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch

hmsah_77The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch: Imagining Antichrist and Others from the Middle Ages to the Reformation

Author: D.H. Strickland

Brepols Publishers

This study examines medieval Christian views of non-Christians and their changing political and theological significance as revealed in late-medieval and early-modern visual culture. Taking as her point of departure Hieronymus Bosch’s famous Epiphany triptych housed in the Prado Museum in Madrid, the author analyzes how representations of Jews, Saracens (later Turks), ‘Ethiopians’, and Mongols for centuries shaped western Christian attitudes towards salvation history, contemporary political conflicts, and the declining status of the Roman Church. She argues that Bosch’s innovative pictorial warning of the coming of Antichrist and the threat posed by non-Christians gained its power and authority through inter-visual references to the medieval past. Before and after Bosch, imaginative constructions that identified Jews and Turks with Gog and Magog, or the Pope with Antichrist, drew upon a long-established range of artistic and rhetorical strategies that artists and authors reconfigured as changing political circumstances demanded. Painted at a pivotal moment on the eve of the Reformation, the Prado Epiphany is a compelling lens through which to look backwards to the Middle Ages, and forwards to Martin Luther and the ideological significance of escalating Christian/non-Christian conflicts in the formation of the new Protestant church.

New Publications: Body-Worlds: Opicinus de Canistris and the Medieval Cartographic Imagination

st_186Body-WorldsOpicinus de Canistris and the Medieval Cartographic Imagination 

Author: K. Whittington

Brepols Publishers

In 1334, an Italian priest named Opicinus de Canistris fell ill and experienced a divine vision of continents and oceans transformed into human figures, a vision which inspired numerous drawings. While they relate closely to contemporary maps and seacharts, religious iconography, medical illustration, and cosmological diagrams, Opicinus’s drawings cannot be assimilated to any of these categories. In their beautiful strangeness they complicate many of our assumptions about medieval visual culture, and spark lines of inquiry into the interplay of religion and science, the practice of experimentation, the operations of allegory in the fourteenth century, and ultimately into the status of representation itself.

Reviews

“Karl Whittington’s Body-Worlds brings Opicinus de Canistris’ idiosyncratic drawings out of the purely personal, mentally disturbed world to which they have generally been consigned into a more normative and accessible realm. To unlock their forms and meanings, Whittington persuasively compares the odd renderings to portolan charts used in marine navigation, which he sees as foundational to Opicinus’s project. And, building on the work of Michael Camille and Victoria Morse, he subjects the drawings to a sensitive analysis that never flattens these indisputably eccentric works but, in the end, enhances their innovative nature even while rendering it understandable.”

– Herbert L. Kessler, Johns Hopkins University

“Opicinus’s drawings contribute in new and unexpected ways to our understanding of the late medieval church, the history of vision and sensibilities, the body, the history of cartography, and Mediterranean studies. Karl Whittington is an intelligent reader of these very difficult works and a wonderful guide for readers encountering this material for the first time. His book will open up an important and under-utilized corpus for further study and should spark an on-going conversation about these intriguing manuscripts.”

– Victoria Morse, Carleton College

“In Body-Worlds, Karl Whittington has produced a magisterial study of the enigmatic drawings of Opicinus de Canistris. Focusing on a key grouping within the larger corpus of images, he examines some two dozen illustrations that superimpose human bodies on the form of the earth, its seas, and its continents. Two questions guide his task: why would this late medieval thinker adapt a diagrammatic form based on current understanding of cartography; and why turn this image into a system for analyzing broad theological and philosophical questions of the day? Although some scholars believe that Opicinus suffered from a form of physical and mental disorder, and that the drawings reflect a disturbed state of mind, Whittington’s complex study indicates otherwise. Whittington does justice to the rich multivalent nature of these drawings, showing us how Opicinus understood the relationship between the body and cosmos, as well as how sexuality and gender worked as important conceptual tools in his visionary system.”

– Catherine Harding, University of Victoria

CFP: Marian Iconography East and West (Rijeka, 2-4 June 2016)

Deadline: Mar 30, 2016

DuccioTenth International Conference of Iconographic Studies
Center for Iconographic Studies – University of Rijeka (Croatia) in collaboration with:
Study of Theology in Rijeka, University of Zagreb (Croatia)
University of Thessaly (Greece)
University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)
Gregorian Pontifical University Rome (Italy)

The conference seeks to explore and discuss recent development in the dialogue between theology, art history, philosophy and cultural theory concerning the iconography of Mary in Eastern and Western art. We welcome academic papers that will approach this subject in an interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse way. The themes and subjects can include the following:

– early representations of Mary
– images of intercession and authority
– devotional iconography
 Mary Mother of God
– Virgin as queen
– Mary as Ecclesia
– Mary and Eve
– Life of the Virgin
– post-Tridentine iconography
– hermeneutical and phenomenological aspects of Mary

Paper proposals should be submitted electronically to cis@ffri.hr
A paper proposal should contain:
1. full name, institution, affiliation, address, phone number(s),
e-mail address
2. title
3. abstract (maximum 2 pages – 500 words)

Invitations to participate will be sent out by email before April 15,
2016
There is NO registration fee
Administration and organizational costs, working materials, lunch and
coffee breaks during conference as well as all organized visits are
covered by the organizers.
All presented papers will be published in the thematic issue of the
IKON journal in May 2017.

Please contact us for any additional information.
Contact person:
Sanja Jovanović
Center for Iconographic Studies
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Rijeka
Sveucilisna avenija 4
51 000 Rijeka
Croatia
E-mail: cis@ffri.hr

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Marian Iconography East and West (Rijeka, 2-4 Jun 16). In:
H-ArtHist, Jan 7, 2016. <http://arthist.net/archive/11897>.

The Bishop Otter Scholarship (Chichester and King’s College London, Deadline 22 May 2015)

St Cuthbert, DarwenThe trustees of the Bishop Otter Trust seek to appoint a person of proven
academic ability to a new scholarship for exploration of theology and the
arts, based in Chichester, working in partnership with the Centre for Arts
and the Sacred at King’s (ASK), London.

The scholarship will be for two years. The successful candidate will be ready
to undertake some original, post-graduate work of research that will generate
theological debate (seminar, lecture, blog, etc), provide a research resource
for the bishop of Chichester, and achieve publication that will constitute
serious scholarship. Residential accommodation (including utilities, etc) is
provided. The scholarship is for £7,000 per annum. The time commitment to
the scholarship is three days a week residence in Chichester, the equivalent
of a .5 part-time post of 20 hours. Holiday is pro rata for a .5 part-time
post.

Applications close at 12.00 noon on Friday 22 May, 2015.
Interviews will be held at The Palace, Chichester, on Tuesday, 2 June, 2015.

Details are available from Mrs Margaret Gibson, The Palace, Chichester, West
Sussex, PO19 1PY
applications@chichester.anglican.org