Tag Archives: multidisciplinary

Funding Opportunity: 5-8 doctoral positions, MIMESIS, Munich Doctoral Program for Literature and the Arts, LMU Munich

cover170x170Funding Opportunity: 5-8 doctoral positions (E13 TV-L, 66%), MIMESIS, Munich Doctoral Program for Literature and the Arts at LMU Munich funded by the Elite Network of Bavaria, starting 1 April 2017
 Deadline for application: 1 November 2016.
The International Doctoral Program (IDP) MIMESIS is dedicated to innovative doctoral research in the fields of literature and the arts, with special emphasis on historical, theoretical and transdisciplinary perspectives. It will enable cooperation between research projects in literature, theatre, performance, music, film studies, architecture and the visual arts, offering both a forum and a framework in which interests drawn from any one of these areas enter into a dialogue with other areas in the wider spectrum of creative engagements. Its research program is framed by the term mimesis, a key concept throughout the history of the arts, right up to the most recent developments in critical and cultural theory. MIMESIS offers a structured program of doctoral study combining seminars, workshops, lecture series and master classes. In addition internships with leading cultural institutions and at partner universities will be integrated into the study program.
How to Apply: The applicants should hold an excellent/above average master’s degree or equivalent in literature, art history, theatre or film studies or related subjects. The outline of the research project should show an explicit connection to the research profile of the program (i.e. mimesis).
Please use the application tool on this website:
http://portal.graduatecenter-lmu.de/gc-application/
For further information please contact:
mimesis-doc@lmu.de
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CFP: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Late-Medieval Political Literature (2 sessions), IMC, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017.

edward_iii_of_england_order_of_the_garterCFP: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Late-Medieval Political Literature I and II, IMC, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017.
Deadline: September 15, 2016

Organizers: Kristin Bourassa and Justin Sturgeon – Centre for Medieval Literature (University of Southern Denmark/University of York) & Canadian Society of Medievalists/Société canadienne des médiévistes

The increased engagement of late-medieval authors in very precise political conversations, and the way these writers justified their interventions in the political sphere by inserting themselves as characters in their own texts and creating authorial personas, have received increased scrutiny from scholars over the last several years. Some of the challenges of studying this literature include 1) the many recognizable genres involved, with individual texts often incorporating characteristics of multiple genres such as mirrors for princes, autobiography, allegory, travel narrative, and letters; and 2) the tendency to group such literature by language and/or modern national borders, making it difficult to consider medieval political literature in the context of the inter-regional conversations in which it often participated.

These three-paper sessions aim to take a broad and interdisciplinary view, using the term “political literature” to denote any form of writing that had the communication of political messages as one of its main goals. This includes visual elements such as images and marginalia, the physical layout of text and image, and the codicological structure of the manuscripts themselves. The sessions aim to open up the field of late medieval political literature and its manuscripts by thinking outside of modern definitions of genre, disciplinary conventions, and so-called “national” borders, with the broad goal of connecting scholars working in this area from different linguistic traditions and from the disciplinary perspectives of history, art history, and literature. Building on an upcoming workshop (March 2017) on late-medieval political literature in France, Burgundy, and England, our aim is to put literature from these regions into conversation with that produced in other areas. By holding two sessions, we hope to attract papers covering a larger variety of languages and geographical locations than could be accomplished with one session alone, and to build a longer-term network of scholars working on this material.

Questions the sessions might address include: How did authors view their own role as contributors to contemporary political conversations? What textual and/or visual tactics did they use to convey their messages? What audiences did they address? To what extent did writers attempt to criticize and/or support individual or institutional power? And how can considering political literature from interdisciplinary, as well as multiple geographical and linguistic traditions help us to better understand the political conversations taking place in a time of significant “international” problems such as the papal schism and the Hundred Years War? We will particularly welcome papers working from interdisciplinary perspectives and that can broaden our geographical scope.

Contact: Kristin Bourassa, kristin@sdu.dk