Tag Archives: byzantium

CFP: Byzantine Heritage in the History and Spiritual Culture of Ukraine, 19 – 22 October 2017, Monastery of St Theodore Studites, Rome, Italy

Culture of Ukraine, October 19 – 22, 2017, Monastery of St Theodore Studites,
Rome, Italy.
Deadline: 25th August 2017.
The International Conference Byzantine heritage in the history and spiritual culture of
Ukraine aims to become a platform for the sharing of knowledge. The conference will
involve the systematic discussion and promotion of the following themes:
  • Byzantine spiritual heritage in the history of Ukraine-Rus’ and Eastern churches of the Kievan tradition
  • the role and influence of the Byzantine Empire in the formation of Ukrainian national identity
  • spiritual culture
  • publishing and literature
  • art
  • theological and philosophical thought
  • religious traditions
and more.
Suggested topics for the conference:
1. Byzantium – Kievan Rus: historical, spiritual and cultural interconnection.
2. Byzantine hesychasm in the tradition of monasticism, and in the culture and
spiritual life of Ukraine-Rus’.
3. The Byzantine Fathers of the Church and the distribution of their books in
Ukraine.
4. Byzantine heritage in literature, art, theological and philosophical
thought, in liturgical science and in the church tradition of Ukraine.
5. “Studion” and its role in reviving the Byzantine Stoudite tradition of the Greek
Catholic Church (contribution by Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky and Patriarch
Josyph Slipyj).
6. Byzantine heritage in the traditions of modern Ukrainian monasticism.
7. The current state of Byzantines in Ukraine.
Working languages of the conference: Ukrainian, English, Italian.
The organizers will provide free accommodation and meals for participants during
the conference. There are plans to publish the results of the conference in the
scientific collection Sofia of Kiev: Byzantium. Russia. Ukraine.
The conference will allow for full-time and part-time participation.
How to apply:

The submission should indicate title of paper and author information (name,
surname, academic degree, title or position, address, home or mobile phone, email,
etc.).

The e-mail address of the Organizing Committee is tnu-pres@ukr.net

CFP: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

CfP ICMA Kalamazoo 2018 Moving People Shifting FrontiersCall for Papers: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean, International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13 2018
Deadline: 10 September 2017

Organizers: Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne) and Maria Alessia Rossi (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artifacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.

Conférence – Didier Martens, «Byzance dans le Nord : icônes de saint Luc dans la peinture flamande du XVe au XVIIe siècle»

iconByzance dans le Nord : icônes de saint Luc dans la peinture flamande du XVe au XVIIe siècle

par Didier Martens, historien de l’art et germaniste, professeur à l’Université libre de Bruxelles, auteur de nombreux ouvrages dont Peinture flamande et goût ibérique XVème-XVIème siècles (Le Livre Timperman, Bruxelles, 2010)

Lieu : Académie royale de Belgique
Palais des Académies, 1 rue Ducale, 1000 Bruxelles (Espace Baudouin)
Date : Jeudi 4 mai 2017 à 18h00
Inscriptions : info@koregos.org

Programme (Académie royale de Belgique) :

18h00 Accueil
18h15 Mot d’accueil par Monsieur Marc Seminckx
Président du Conseil d’administration de Koregos
18h25 Conférence
Byzance dans le Nord : icônes de saint Luc dans la peinture flamande du XVe au XVIIe siècle
par Monsieur Didier Martens

À partir du XVe siècle, des représentations de la Vierge à l’Enfant attribuées à l’évangéliste Luc vont commencer à circuler dans le nord-ouest de l’Europe, sous la forme de copies plus ou moins fidèles venues d’Italie.

Ces images, procédant de modèles byzantins, seront considérées comme des témoignages véridiques, ayant valeur de documents quant à l’aspect physique du Christ et de sa Mère. Elles susciteront dès les années 1490 de nombreux miracles et donneront lieu à des pèlerinages. L’engouement du public pour ces représentations estimées authentiques amènera à son tour, dans les anciens Pays-Bas, une importante production de copies.

Avant le XVIIe siècle, le modèle byzantin fut le plus souvent adapté aux traditions artistiques locales : l’icône fut sans autre forme de procès convertie en un panneau de Primitif flamand.

À partir du XVIIe siècle, les copistes s’efforceront en revanche d’imiter le plus fidèlement possible leurs modèles et créeront ainsi un étonnant style néo-byzantin. En réalité, il est clair que l’art de Byzance plaisait peu aux peintres des XVe, XVIe et XVIIe siècles et que la valorisation des icônes pour des raisons d’ordre religieux a donné naissance à un véritable conflit entre esthétique et dévotion, goût et authenticité.

C’est à ce conflit et à la difficile gestion de la différence artistique durant trois siècles d’art flamand que sera consacrée la présente conférence.

Entrée gratuite. Inscription souhaitée avant le 2 mai à l’adresse : info@koregos.org

Lecture, Prof Liz James: ‘Light and colour; dark and shadow’, 5.30pm,Tues 11th October, Courtauld Institute, London

church-of-the-theotokos-pammakaristos

Church of the Theotokos Pammakaristos (Liz James)

Prof Liz James (University of Sussex): ‘Light and colour; dark and shadow’

Light and colour, darkness and shadow, are all fundamental aspects of works of art in a practical way (can we see the work?), a formal fashion (what colours are used?) and conceptually (why these colours? Why this light or this lighting?). But they are also elements of the work of art that have tended to have a secondary place within the history of art. Through a discussion of Byzantine monumental mosaics, this lecture will consider some of the ways in which light, dark, colour and shade are fundamental elements in the appearance, effectiveness and function of images. 

Liz James is Professor of Art History at the University of Sussex and a Byzantinist. She has been interested in light and colour for a long time, writing her doctoral thesis on colour in Byzantium. She has just finished writing a book about medieval mosaics (provisionally entitled ‘A short history of medieval mosaics’).

Ticket / entry details:

Tuesday 11 October 2016
5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

This lecture launches the Frank Davis Memorial Series on Light/Darkness

Open to all, free admission

Conference Programme: Minority Influences in Medieval Society, St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, November 25-26, 2016

tumblr_mpkos7mo2o1ssmm02o1_1280Conference Programme: Minority Influences in Medieval Society, St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, November 25-26, 2016.

Friday 25 November

9.45 Welcome (Nora Berend)

Session 1. 10-11.15

Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg) Influences of mudejar spirituality on majority Christian religious life

Teresa Shawcross (Princeton) Ethno-religious Minorities and the Shaping of Byzantine Society during the Crusades

COFFEE

Session 2. 11.30-12.45

Annette Kehnel (Mannheim) Minority language, minority culture, minority tradition: Who exactly cares?

Amira Bennison (Cambridge) The Berber imprint on the medieval Maghrib

LUNCH

Session 3.  14.15-15.30

Ana Echevarría (Madrid) Reinventing law codes under foreign conditions: influence, adaptation or endurance in the Iberian peninsula

Eduard Mühle (Münster)  Real and perceived influence of minority groups in medieval Poland (12th-13th c)

COFFEE

Session 4. 16-18 Eva Haverkamp (München) Jews in the high medieval economy: how to evaluate their role

István Petrovics (Szeged) The Role of “Latin”  Guests in the Economic Life and Urban Development of Medieval Hungary

James Barrett (Cambridge) Northern Peoples and Medieval European Trade: Locating Agency

 

Saturday 26 November

Session 1. 9.30-10.45

Przemysław Wiszewski (Wrocław) Cultural turn in 12th-14th c. Silesia: how the German-speaking minority became the cultural majority

Luciano Gallinari (Cagliari) Catalans in Sardinia and the transformation of Sardinians into a political minority

COFFEE

Session 2. 11.15-12.30

Matthias Hardt (Leipzig) Western immigrants in High Medieval Bohemia

Katalin Szende (Budapest) Iure Theutonico? German settlers, local rulers, and legal frameworks for immigration to medieval East Central Europe  LUNCH

Supported by the DAAD Cambridge Research Hub with funds from the German
Federal Foreign Office (FFO)

How to register: To register for the conference, please email Dr Nora Berend, nb213@cam.ac.uk and send a cheque for £ 7 (or the appropriate cost for one day; an optional charge for lunch can also be added, see below) to her to St Catharine’s College, Cambridge CB2 1RL. Cheques must be made payable to St Catharine’s College. Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Registration is £4 for Friday and £3 for Saturday; this is to cover the cost of refreshments during the day. Coffe, tea and biscuits will be available.

Lunch will ONLY be provided for those who order and pay £12 by 10 November, but it will be possible instead to leave during the lunch break to get some food in town.

 

CFP: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era

palaiologos-to-deleteCFP: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era, One day and a half Symposium & Worshop, University of Birmingham, February, 24-25, 2017.
Deadline: 30 September 2016

 

Organisers: Andrea Mattiello – University of Birmingham
Maria Alessia Rossi – The Courtauld Institute of Art

Keynote Speakers: Niels Gaul – University of Edinburgh
Cecily Hilsdale – McGill University
Angeliki Lymberopoulou – The Open University

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire, such as the Adriatic and Balkan regions, the major islands of Cyprus and Crete, and the regions surrounding the cities of Constantinople, Thessaloniki, and Mystras. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

In its last centuries, the political entity of the Empire of the Romaioi released cultural and artistic energies migrating towards new frontiers of intellectual achievements. The intent is to counter-balance the innovation of these works of art with the notion of decline and the narrative of decay frequently acknowledged for this period; and to promote an understanding of transformation where previous cultural heritages were integrated into new socio-political orders.

The Symposium – hosted on the afternoon of the 24 and the morning of the 25 February – will bring together established scholars, early-career scholars, and postgraduate students. Three keynotes will provide the methodological framework for the discussion; while the selected papers will focus solely on the visual expressions and cultural trajectories of the artworks produced during the late Palaiologan Era.

The Workshop, hosted on the afternoon of the 25 February, will offer the opportunity to further the discussion in a more informal setting and for a selected number of Master students to interact and offer brief presentations.

Postgraduate students and early-career scholars are invited to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers on art and architecture history, material culture and archaeology, visual aspects of palaeography and codicology, and gender studies.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

 

– Gift exchange in view of diplomatic missions or dynastic marriages both within the Empire and with its neighbours

– Visual evidence of the interaction between the Emperor and the Patriarch

– Innovations in the visual agenda of the Palaiologan dynasty

– Aspects of religious iconography and visual representations of theological controversies, i.e. Hesychasm

– Artistic patronage and manuscript production as the outcome of dynastic and institutional interactions

– Visual and material production as the outcome of political and social circumstances, i.e. the Zealot uprising or the Unionist policy

– Evidence of artistic exchanges in the depictions of women, men, and children during the Palaiologan Era

 

How to submit: Titles of proposed papers, abstracts of 250 words, and a short CV should be sent to Maria Alessia Rossi – m.alessiarossi@icloud.com and Andrea Mattiello – axm570@bham.ac.uk by 30 September 2016.

 

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 4th Forum Medieval Art

mjc-logo-lrgCall for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel at the 4th Forum Medieval Art, Berlin and Brandenburg, September 20–23, 2017.
Deadline: May 9, 2016

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 4th Forum Medieval Art, Berlin and Brandenburg, September 20–23, 2017. The biannual colloquium is organized by the Deutsche Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V.
The theme for the 4th Forum Medieval Art is 360° – Places, Boundaries, Global Perspectives. It will focus on research at the geographical and methodological boundaries of classical medieval studies. The various venues in Berlin and Brandenburg with their medieval heritage and their rich collections of Byzantine and Middle Eastern will be taken as a starting point. Accordingly, the conference will highlight the interaction of Central European medieval art and artistic production with other regions ranging from Eastern Europe, Byzantium, the Middle East, the Caucasus and the Mediterranean to the British Isles and the Baltic region. Thus research areas such as Byzantine Studies or Islamic Art History will be brought into the focus and consciousness of medieval studies, particularly in the context of the endangered artistic and architectural monuments of the Middle East. Especially welcome are topics discussing phenomena such as migration, media transformation and changing cultural paradigms. By asking for culturally formative regions at the borders of “Europe” and transcultural contact zones, definitions of the Middle Ages can be put up for debate. As a counterpart to this panorama, research about the region of Brandenburg and Berlin will also be presented. This includes subjects of museum studies and the history of art of and in Berlin, where the development of areas of cultural exchange has a long tradition.
We invite session proposals that fit within the 360° – Places, Boundaries, Global Perspectives theme and are relevant to Byzantine studies.
How to submit: Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (http://www.maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/4th-forum-medieval-art). The deadline for submission is May 9, 2016. Proposals should include:
*Title
*Session abstract (500 words)
*Proposed list of session participants (presenters and session chair)
*CV
Applicants will be notified of the status of their proposal by May 16, 2016. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session proposal to the Forum by June 1, 2016.
If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair) up to $300 maximum for residents of Germany, up to $600 maximum for EU residents, and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.