Tag Archives: Violence

CFP: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018, Bloomington, Indiana

5487225791_f2f9dd3b91Call for Papers: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018,

Keynote: Elizabeth Allen, University of California, Irvine

The Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University invites proposals for its 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, April 6-7, 2018, in Bloomington, Indiana

Iron maidens, the Inquisition, the Crusades, witch burnings: these images of violence, both fact and fiction, are profoundly connected to the Middle Ages. Yet if in many popular conceptions, the medieval world is associated with brutality and suffering, the period also offers unique formulations of mercy, compassion, and the power of resistance. In exploring both medieval violence or nonviolence, this symposium seeks to examine specific structures of power and brutality but also to complicate the narrative of the violent Middle Ages.

We invite papers on any medieval discipline or region that engage issues of medieval violence and nonviolence: What functions did violence serve in the Middle Ages? How might acts of physical and rhetorical violence against othered groups (gendered, religious, cultural, racial, nonhuman) reflect larger concerns or anxieties within medieval culture? Is there a medieval aesthetic of violence? How does medieval music, art, theology, and literature glorify or critique brutality and/or suffering? How do medieval texts understand the uses and effects of verbal violence? How might medieval violence operate in a metaphorical sense, as violence done to texts or to the material past? What does nonviolence look like in the Middle Ages? Given the functions and pervasiveness of violence, what are some ways in which it is resisted and negotiated? What alternatives do medieval people or institutions offer to violence? How might medieval understandings of mercy or love act as a counter to violence? We also encourage papers on modern representations of the Middle Ages that consider to what extent and to what ends these medievalisms employ violence and nonviolence.

We are also excited to announce that graduate students whose papers have been accepted for the symposium are invited to submit their papers by March 2, 2018 to be considered for the IU Medieval Studies Symposium Paper Prize. Papers will be evaluated by a panel of IU medieval faculty. The prize of $250 will be awarded before the symposium to help defray the cost of travel, and the winner will be noted in the program.

Please submit 200 word abstracts or complete sessions proposals to IUMestSymposium@gmail.com by November 24, 2017.

Advertisements

Giotto’s Circle Presents Berlin Remixed: Papers on Italian Art and Architecture from the RSA Conference.

nuremberg_chronicle_berlin[1]After the recent Renaissance Society of America conference in Berlin, the Courtauld will be hosting an opportunity for those who could not see he papers – whether due to session clash or not attending the conference – in the, Research Forum Seminar Room, 30 April, 10.00 am – 6.00 pm.

10.00 – 11.30: SPACES AND PLACES I

Alexander Roestel (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Habemus paulum: Reconstructing the Florentine Church of San Paolino

Joanna Cannon (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Relocating the Virgin. Altars and panel paintings in the Dominican churches of Tuscany.

Donal Cooper (University of Cambridge): Provincialism and Plurality in the Franciscan Church Interior

11.30 – 11.45: Break

11.45 – 1.15: SPACES AND PLACES II/WORDS AND PICTURES I

Michaela Zoeschg (Victoria and Albert Museum/The Courtauld Institute of Art): Royal Courts and Enclosed Gardens: The Frescos in Santa Maria Donnaregina (Naples) and Their Audience

Janet Robson (Independent Scholar): Pride of Place: La Verna, Monticelli, and a Trecento Painting for a Noble Clarissan Nun

Federico Botana (Queen Mary, University of London): Learning the Trade: Illustrated Abbaco Manuscripts in Fifteenth-Century Florence.

1.15 – 2.30: Lunch (not provided)

2.30 – 4.00: WORDS AND PICTURES II

Scott Nethersole (The Courtauld Institute of Art): “Your arrows have pierced me”: Perugino’s Saint Sebastian and the Spectator

Federica Pich (University of Leeds): Written for the Viewer, Painted for the Reader: On the Rhetoric of Words in Portraits

Paul Hills (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Language and the Discrimination of Colors in the Time of Titian and Veronese

4.00 – 4.30 Break

4.30 – 6.00: BEYOND TUSCANY

Bryony Bartlett-Rawlings (The Courtauld Institute of Art): ‘Beware, you envious thieves of the work and invention of others, keep your thoughtless hands from these works of ours’.

Eva Papoulia (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Gregory XIII and Sixtus V: A Known Antipathy, an Unknown Project

A WIDER VIEW

Caroline Campbell (National Gallery) – discussant in a round tablePainting and Painters in Fifteenth-Century Venice’

Closing remarks

Reception to mark the publication of Péter Bokody’s book Images-within-Images in Italian Painting (1250-1350): Reality and Reflexivity, Ashgate 2015.