Author Archives: costanzabeltrami

CFP: Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages, University of Saint Andrews, 13–14 September 2019

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Reliquary diptych, late 14th century, Italian. (Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917. 17.190.982)

The School of Art History, SAIMS and Special Collections Division at the University of St Andrews are pleased to announce an upcoming two-day conference on the archive in medieval art and thought.

The word archive suggests the acts of taxonomy and conservation, but also interpretation and regulation. Its etymology traces back to the Greek arkheion, thus highlighting the political nature of the physical archive and the act of archiving itself. The medieval world maintained this sense of privileged access. Isidore of Seville connected the Latin word archivium with arca, strongbox, and arcanum, mystery. But the term was malleable, referring to collections of various goods and treasures, not just of parchment records and registers. And yet, Michael Clanchy has argued that the medieval mind did not always distinguish between the library and the archive, as we do today.

The organisers therefore invite proposals on the theme of the expanded medieval archive, as it relates to art and material culture. What can medieval collections, compilations, and assemblages of material things tell us about the accumulation of knowledge and the preservation of memory? How is the archive manipulated to fit political or social agendas, and by whom? What are the limits of the medieval archive? Paper topics and themes may include, though are not limited to:

  • Records or inventories of collections, secular, civic, and ecclesiastical;
  • The archive as a physical object or visual record, including books and manuscripts, buildings, reliquaries, etc.;
  • The accretive nature of written testimony in the form of: chronicles, herbals, visitations, necrologies, inscriptions and tituli;
  • Time, writing history through the material, and collapsing temporalities;
  • The creation and perpetuation of memory, identity, and authority;
  • The accumulation and transmission of cultural or familial knowledge via material culture;
  • The politics of preservation, documentation, and display in the medieval world, and of the medieval in the modern world.

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages will take place 13–14 September 2019 in St Andrews, Scotland. Professor Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) will deliver the keynote. The organisers intend to publish the conference proceedings as an edited volume.

All papers must be no more than 30 minutes maxmimum. Please submit a 250 word abstract and title by 15 February 2019. Prof Julian Luxford, Prof Kathryn Rudy, and Dr Emily Savage, along with Senior Archivist Rachel Hart, warmly welcome all submissions and queries at medievalarchive@st-andrews.ac.uk.

https://medievalarchive2019.wordpress.com/

Lecture: Professor Helen Nicholson (Cardiff University), ‘A Ruler of the Latin East? Queen Sybil of Jerusalem (1186-1190)’, IHR, London, 22 January 2019, 7pm

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The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting the following lecture on Tuesday 22nd January at 7pm: 

 

Professor Helen Nicholson (Cardiff University), speaking on ‘A Ruler of the Latin East? Queen Sybil of Jerusalem (1186-1190)’

Location: Institute of Historical Research, Wolfson Room NB01, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU).

The lecture is open to all.

Web Resource: Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources

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The Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources aims to document all given names recorded in European sources written between 500 and 1600. New editions are published quarterly.

Looking for a particular name? Browse the entries.

Wondering how to interpret an entry? See the guide.

Want to know more? Read about the project.

See: http://dmnes.org

CFP: Pilgrimage and the Senses, University of Oxford, 7 June 2019

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Deadline for submissions: 20 January 2019 

Keynote Speaker: Professor Kathryn Rudy (University of St. Andrews)

With the release of its inaugural issue in 2006, The Senses and Society journal proclaimed a “sensual revolution” in the humanities and social sciences. The ensuing decade has seen a boom in sensory studies, resulting in research networks, museum exhibitions, and a wealth of publications. This interdisciplinary conference hosted at the University of Oxford aims to shed light on how sensory perception shapes and is shaped by the experience of pilgrimage across cultures, faith traditions, and throughout history.

Pilgrimages present an intriguing paradox. Grounded in physical experiences—a journey (real or imagined), encounters with sites and/or relics, and commemorative tokens—they also simultaneously demand a devotional focus on the metaphysical. A ubiquitous and long-lasting devotional practice, pilgrimage is a useful lens through which to examine how humans encounter the sacred through the tools of perception available to us. Focusing on the ways in which pilgrimage engages the senses will contribute to our knowledge of how people have historically understood both religious experience and their bodies as vehicles of devotional participation. We call on speakers to grapple with the challenges of understanding the sensory experience of spiritual phenomena, while bearing in mind that understandings of the senses can vary according to specific cultural contexts. While the five senses are a natural starting point, we are open to including papers that deal with “sense” in a more general way, such as senses of time and place.

Sample topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • the role of beholding (places, relics, miracles, mementos) in the pilgrimage experience
  • haptic encounters with relics
  • ways in which pilgrims are seen: wearing specific clothing and/or badges, public acts (or affects) of devotion, how pilgrims are depicted or described
  • pilgrims’ auditory expressions: wailing/crying, chanting, singing, reciting prayers
  • bathing and purification in preparation for devotions
  • food as a ritual element or means of experiencing cultures along a pilgrimage route
  • the place of music on the pilgrimage route and/or at pilgrimage destinations
  • pain as a facet of the pilgrimage journey
  • the sensory spectacle—visual, auditory, olfactory—of pilgrimage processions
  • devotional objects that require handling, such as prayer beads and prayer wheels
  • psychosomatic sensory experiences as a means of engaging with the divine
  • the evocation of sensory participation through works of art and/or written accounts

The organisers invite 20-minute papers from any discipline on topics related to the themes outlined above, especially in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, art history, history, literature, musicology, religious studies, sociology, and theology. We welcome submissions relating to aspects of pilgrimage of any faith or historical period. Doctoral students and early career researchers are particularly encouraged to apply.

Please submit a title, abstract (max. 250 words), and brief bio to pilgrimagesenses2019@gmail.com by January 20th. Successful applicants will be notified by February 5th. All submissions and papers must be in English.

Click here for more information

Job: Ass. teaching prof. in History of Architecture, Pennsylvania State University, deadline January 15, 2019

Penn20State20Old20Main20tulipsThe Department of Art History at The Pennsylvania State University seeks to appoint a three-year fixed-term assistant teaching professor with a specialization in ancient or medieval architecture of any geography. The appointment will begin on August 1, 2019 and carry the possibility of renewal. We are particularly interested in candidates conversant in diverse methodologies, including those involving new technologies and/or technical art history. The department values dynamic teachers who are prepared to lead upper level undergraduate and graduate courses in their field, as well as teach large introductory classes in the history of Western architecture. Expectations include undergraduate advising, graduate mentoring, and departmental and university service. Preference will be given to candidates who have a Ph.D. in art history or a related discipline.

To apply go to https://psu.edu.jobs/ job #84579, candidates should upload a letter of application, an up-to-date CV, and the names and contact information for three references to the Penn State Electronic Job Management System.  Applications received by January 15 will be assured full consideration.  However, applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

CFP: ‘Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and Scale in Medieval Art’, Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium, London, Friday 8 February 2019

image-1024x745The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider issues and opportunities encountered by medieval artists and viewers in relation to size and scale.

Deadline: 16 November 2018

From micro-architectural reliquaries and minute boxwood prayer beads to colossal sculpture and the built spaces of grand cathedrals and civic structures, size mattered in medieval art. Examples of simple one-upmanship between the castles and palaces of lords and kings and the churches and cathedrals of abbots and bishops are numerous. How big to make it was a principal concern for both patrons and makers of medieval art. Scale could be manipulated to dramatic effect in the manufacture of manuscripts and the relative disposition of elements within their decorative programmes. Divine proportions – of the Temple of Solomon or the Church of the Holy Sepulchre – were evoked in the specific measurements and configuration of contemporary buildings and decisions were made based on concern with numbers and number sequences.

Inspired by the ‘Russian doll’ relationship between the Sainte Chapelle in Paris and its micro-architectural miniature in the form of a gilded reliquary in the Musée de Cluny, Scaling the Middle Ages seeks to explore a range of questions surrounding proportion, scale, size, and measurement in relation to medieval art and architecture. The Sainte Chapelle, built by the saint-king of France Louis IX to house the relics of Christ’s Passion, is itself often described as an over-sized reliquary turned inside-out. The Cluny reliquary – made to house relics of Saints Maxien, Lucien, and Julien held within the chapel – both complicates and compliments that comparison, at once shrinking the chapel back down to size through close architectural quotation of its form in miniature and pointing the viewer’s attention back to that same, larger space. The relationship between these two artefacts raises a host of questions, including:

Scale and making

How were ideas about size and scale communicated between patrons, architects, craftspeople, and artists? In an age without universal standardised units of measurement, how did craftsmen negotiate problems of scale and proportion?

How were the measurements of a medieval building determined? What techniques did architects, masons, and artists use to determine the scale of their work?

Scale and meaning

What effects were achieved and what responses evoked by the manipulation of scale, from the minute to the massive, in medieval art?

What was the role of proportion and scale in architectural ‘copies’ or quotations?

What representational problems were encountered by artists approaching out-sized subjects, such as giants?

How was scale manipulated in order to communicate hierarchy or relative importance in medieval art?

How did size and scale function in competition between patrons or communities in their artistic commissions and built environments?

Problems of scale

What, if anything, happened when something was the wrong size? When was something too big, or too small? And how were such problems solved by patrons and makers?

How does the disembodied viewing of medieval art through digital surrogates distort or assist in our perception of scale?

How can modern measuring techniques and digital technology enhance our understanding of medieval objects and buildings?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these and related issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing buildings and objects from across the Middle Ages (broadly understood in geographical and chronological terms). The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research.

To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20-minute paper, together with a CV, to teresa.lane@courtauld.ac.uk and oliver.mitchell@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 16 November 2018.

Organised by Oliver Mitchell and Teresa Lane (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Job: Professor/in fuer Allg. Mittlere und Neuere Kunstgeschichte, Innsbruck

universitat-innsbruckInstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Philosophisch-Historische Fakultät, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck
Application deadline: Nov 14, 2018

Ausschreibung der Stelle einer/eines Universitätsprofessorin/ Universitätsprofessors für Allgemeine Kunstgeschichte mit Schwerpunkt Mittlere und Neuere Kunstgeschichte

Am Institut für Kunstgeschichte der Philosophisch-Historische Fakultät der Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck ist die Stelle einer/eines

gemäß § 98 UG 2002 in Form eines unbefristeten privatrechtlichen Arbeitsverhältnisses mit der Universität zu besetzen.

AUFGABEN

Die Stelleninhaberin / der Stelleninhaber soll das Fach Allgemeine Kunstgeschichte mit Schwerpunkt Mittlere und Neuere Kunstgeschichte in seiner ganzen Breite in Forschung und Lehre vertreten. Der Forschungsschwerpunkt soll in einem oder mehreren Themenbereichen im Zeitrahmen von Spätantike bis ausgehender früher Neuzeit liegen.

Die Forschungstätigkeit sollte ihren Niederschlag auch in internationalen Tagungen, Publikationen und drittmittelfinanzierten Forschungsprojekten finden.

Gewünscht ist eine vielfältig vernetzte Forscher/innenpersönlichkeit, die fähig und bereit ist, interdisziplinär zu arbeiten und neue Impulse zu geben.

Die Stelleninhaberin / der Stelleninhaber soll sich jedenfalls in den universitären Forschungsschwerpunkt „Kulturelle Begegnungen & Kulturelle Konflikte“ einbringen.

Die Mitarbeit in der akademischen Selbstverwaltung wird erwartet.

ANSTELLUNGSERFORDERNISSE

a)    eine der Verwendung entsprechende abgeschlossene inländische oder gleichwertige ausländische Hochschulbildung;
b)    einschlägige Lehrbefugnis (Habilitation) oder gleichzuhaltende Eignung;
c)    fachspezifische Monographien und Publikationen in international anerkannten Publikationsorganen und Fachzeitschriften
d)    Nachweis der Einbindung in internationale Forschung;
e)    Erfahrung in der Einwerbung von Drittmitteln;
f)    nachgewiesene didaktische Fähigkeiten aufgrund universitärer Lehrerfahrung;
g)    Führungskompetenz (Sozial-, Problemlösungs- und Organisationskompetenz).

Bewerbungen müssen bis spätestens 14.11.2018
an der Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, Fakultäten Servicestelle, Standort Innrain 52f, A-6020 Innsbruck (fss-innrain52f@uibk.ac.at) eingelangt sein.

Die Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck strebt eine Erhöhung des Frauenanteiles an und lädt deshalb qualifizierte Frauen zur Bewerbung ein. Frauen werden bei gleicher Qualifikation vorrangig aufgenommen.

Für diese Position ist eine Einreihung in die Verwendungsgruppe A1 des Kollektivvertrages für ArbeitnehmerInnen der Universitäten und ein Mindestentgelt von € 5.005,10/Monat (14 mal) vorgesehen. Ein in Abhängigkeit von Qualifikation und Erfahrung höheres Entgelt und die Ausstattung der Professur sind Gegenstand von Berufungsverhandlungen. Darüber hinaus bietet die Universität zahlreiche attraktive Zusatzleistungen (http://www.uibk.ac.at/universitaet/zusatzleistungen/).

Die Bewerbungsunterlagen sollen jedenfalls enthalten: Lebenslauf mit einer Beschreibung des wissenschaftlichen und beruflichen Werdeganges, Liste der wissenschaftlichen Veröffentlichungen, der Vorträge sowie der sonstigen wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten und Projekte, Beschreibung abgeschlossener, laufender und geplanter Forschungstätigkeiten und die fünf wichtigsten Arbeiten. Die Bewerbungsunterlagen sind jedenfalls digital (CD, E-Mail usw.) beizubringen. Die Papierform ist optional.

Laufende Informationen über den Stand des Verfahrens finden Sie unter: http://www.uibk.ac.at/fakultaeten-servicestelle/standorte/innrain52f/berufungen_habilitationen/berufungen_index_2010.html