Tag Archives: Leeds Medieval Congress

CFP: Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session, 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018

mjc-logo-lrgCall for For Session Proposals, Mary Jaharis Center’s sponsored session, 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018
Deadline: September 1, 2017
The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 25th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2–5, 2018. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.
The thematic strand for the 2018 IMC is “Memory.” See the IMC Call for Papers (https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2018_call.html) for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.
Session proposals should be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/25th-imc). The deadline for submission is September 1, 2017. Proposals should include:
**Title
**100-word session abstract
**Session moderator and academic affiliation
**Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
**CV
Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.
If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.
The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.
Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.
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TODAY: Leeds IMC, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland, Session 703

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland will be running its first conference session this year at the Leeds International Medieval Congress.

Session 703 – Tuesday 4 July 2017 – 14.15 to 15.45

The following papers will be delivered:

Ron Baxter (Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture and the Medieval Workshop (paper 703-a);

James King (The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Romanesque Sculpture of Dunfermline Abbey and Its Influence: Evidence and Some Questions (paper 703-b);

Agata Gomółka (Department of Art History & World Art Studies, University of East Anglia) – Carving Romanesque Bodies (paper 703-a).

Abtstract

Romanesque art and architecture was transnational in a European context.
The architectural sculpture produced in the British Isles and Ireland during the late
11th and 12th centuries demonstrates the visceral connection between these off-
shore islands and mainland Europe at that time. In its inaugural session at the IMC,
the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI) is seen to reveal
some of the ways in which its searchable and fully illustrated database enables art
historians to build an understanding of Romanesque stone carving by identifying
authorship, tracing the diffusion of carved ornament, recreating workshop practice,
and reimagining aesthetic criteria. Launched in 1987 by Professor George Zarnecki
with British Academy support and now affiliated also to King’s College London, the
CRSBI is an Open Access website comprising illustrated records of the Romanesque
sculpture at some five thousand sites in Britain and Ireland.

CFP: Special thematic strand: ‘Otherness,’ IMC Leeds 2017

imc_postcard_2017_front_1Call for Papers: Special thematic strand: ‘Otherness,’ International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 3–6 July 2017
Deadline for paper proposals: 31 August 2016.
Deadline for session proposals:
30 September 2016

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome.

However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which – for 2017 – is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch.

‘Others’ can be found everywhere: outside one’s own community (from foreigners to non-human monsters) and inside it (for example, religious and social minorities, or individual newcomers in towns, villages, or at court).

One could encounter the ‘Others’ while travelling, in writing, reading and thinking about them, by assessing and judging them, by ‘feelings’ ranging from curiosity to contempt, and behaviour towards them which, in turn, can lead to integration or exclusion, friendship or hostility, and support or persecution.

The demarcation of the ‘Self’ from ‘Others’ applies to all areas of life, to concepts of thinking and mentalité as well as to social ‘reality’, social intercourse and transmission of knowledge and opinions. Forms and concepts of the ‘Other’, and attitudes towards ‘Others’, imply and reveal concepts of ‘Self’, self-awareness and identity, whether expressed explicitly or implicitly. There is no ‘Other’ without ‘Self’. A classification as ‘Others’ results from a comparison with oneself and one’s own identity groups.

Thus, attitudes towards ‘Others’ oscillate between admiring and detesting, and invite questioning into when the ‘Other’ becomes the ‘Strange’.

The aim of the IMC is to cover the entire spectrum of ‘Otherness’ through multi-disciplinary approaches, on a geographical, ethnic, political, social, legal, intellectual and even personal level, to analyse sources from all genres, areas, and regions.

Possible entities to research for ‘Otherness’ could include (but are not limited to):
•       Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems

  • Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
    •       Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
    •       The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’.
    •       Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
    •       Otherness related to art, musics, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
    •       Any further specific determinations of ‘alterity’

Methodologies and Approaches to ‘Otherness’ (not necessarily distinct, but overlapping) could include:
•       Definitions, concepts, and constructions of ‘Otherness’
•       Indicators of, criteria and reasons for demarcation
•       Relation(s) between ‘Otherness’ and concepts of ‘Self’
•       Communication, encounters, and social intercourse with ‘Others’ (in embassies, travels, writings, quarrels, conflicts, and persecution)

  • Knowledge, perception, and assessment of the ‘Others’
    •       Attitudes and behaviour towards ‘Others’
    •       Deviation from any ‘norms’ of life and thought (from the superficial to the fundamental)
    •       Gender and transgender perspectives
    •       Co-existence and segregation
    •       Methodological problems when inquiring into ‘Otherness’
    •       The Middle Ages as the ‘Other’ compared with contemporary times (‘Othering’ the Middle Ages).

    How to Submit: The IMC online proposal form is now available.
    Proposals should be submitted online at: www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2017_call.html
    The IMC welcomes session and paper proposals submitted in all major European languages.

Substitute paper wanted for Leeds session

Tunstead, rood screen

Tunstead, rood screen

Session 1135, Wednesday 9 July 2014: 11.15-12.45

Local Heroes: New Approaches to the Study of Minor Saints and Their Cults

Organizer: Anne E. Bailey, Harris Manchester College, University of Oxford

Chair: Rodney M. Thomson, School of History & Classics, University of Tasmania

One of the Hagiography Society sessions at Leeds this year has had a speaker pull out and is in need of a replacement.  The session topic is on minor saints’ cults, and the session is intended to be interdisciplinary, so there is plenty of room for art-historical work.  Although Leeds is a medieval conference, the Hagiography Society is expanding its reach to include a broader historical and geographical range, so papers outside of the strictly interpreted realm of medieval studies would also be welcome.  If you are interested in contributing a paper, please email Anne Bailey (anne.bailey@history.ox.ac.uk); or, if you know someone who might be interested, please forward this information.