Tag Archives: Portugal

INSCRIBING COLONIALISM IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY PORTUGAL, 26 MARCH 2019, QMUL, London

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place tomorrow, 26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

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Jessica Barker, ‘Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal’, 26 March 2019, QMUL

Maius image

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place on 26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

Research Group: Research Network of Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies

logo_rede_estudos_medievaisThe Red de Estudios Medievales Interdisciplinares is the result of a collaboration between scholars researching Medieval Art at various departments of the University of Compostela, other Galician and Portuguese universities and the Instituto de Estudos Gallegos “Padre Sarmiento” del CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas).

The group welcomes scholars in Spain and abroad, and runs various research activities, for example: cultural and formative site visits, training courses, events leading to multidisciplinary publications, website articles, European research projects.

To learn more and get involved in their research activities, visit their website. 

CFP: The Art of Ornament. Meaning, Archetypes, Forms and Uses, Lisboa, November 23 – 25, 2017

199354720975162159ekrxrxpmcConference: The Art of Ornament. Meaning, Archetypes, Forms and Uses, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisboa, November 23 – 25, 2017

Deadline for abstract submission: 30 April 2017
Notification of acceptance of abstract: 31 May 2017
Provisional Programme: 30 June  2017
Deadline for registration: 31 August 2017

The topics suggested for proposals for participating in this Conference
are generically the following, although others may be considered if they are deemed pertinent and relevant:

1.    Contemplating the ornament our days: meaning, tendencies and
paths.
2.    Ornament and portuguese decorative arts;
3.    Revivalism, exoticism and ornament
4.    Ornamentalists and engravers: creation, reception and
dissemination;
5.    Ornament and architecture: historiography, theory and present
times;
6.    Mobility and transcontinentality: the migration of forms;
7.    Between the sacred and the profane: appropriations, reinventions
and coexistence;
8.    Intersection, union and dissonance: literature, music and visual
arts.

Abstracts (of no more than 500 words), accompanied by a short bio (250
words), in English or Portuguese, should be sent to the members of the
organizing committee, at iha.ornament2017@gmail.com by April 30, 2016.
Participants will be notified by the end of May, and the conference
program will be published in June. The languages of the conference are
English, Portuguese, Spanish and French.

A selection of papers from the conference will be published in Revista
de História da Arte – Série W, an annual peer-reviewed digital  journal.

For all questions regarding administration and practical matters, as
well as the payment of the conference inscription, please send an email
to  iha.ornament2017@gmail.com

CFP: 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE THE MIDDLE AGES: A GLOBAL CONTEXT?, 13-15 DECEMBER, 2017, PORTUGAL, LISBON (MEDIEVAL EUROPE IN MOTION RESEARCH GROUP)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8CFP: 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE THE MIDDLE AGES: A GLOBAL CONTEXT?, 13-15 DECEMBER, 2017, PORTUGAL, LISBON (MEDIEVAL EUROPE IN MOTION RESEARCH GROUP)
How to Apply: Proposals for either 3-paper sessions or individual papers will be equally welcome. Individual papers should be 20 minutes in length. Please submit an abstract of no more that 250 words and a brief CV to mem2017@fcsh.unl.pt
Deadline: 15 June 2017.

NB: Conference Registration Fees:
Participation with Paper: 75€ (Registration fee includes documentation and coffee-breaks);
• Attendance: 30€ for the general public and 25€ for students;
• Gala Dinner: 35€.

In December, as the third year of its six-year Strategic Project draws to a close, the Institute for Medieval Studies – whose research groups have been working around our main theme, “People and Knowledge in Motion: Medieval Portugal in Trans-European Networks” – is hosting a Conference aimed at bringing together scholars from around the world in order to discuss and reassess the research undertaken in the Institute and in the wider academic world on mobility, the circulation of models, and phenomena of a global nature during the Middle Ages. In the course of the last three years, researchers specialising in the areas of History, History of Art, Archaeology and Literature, have developed their research with a strong emphasis on the question of the circulation of men and women, ideas, models and artefacts as mirrors of a medieval reality in which
mental, symbolic and physical mobility seems to correspond less and less to the ancient perceptions and stereotypes of Medieval Men and Society as characterized by stillness and immutability. Furthermore, work in the Institute has raised additional questions and problems intimately connected with the topics being studied, but also very much in line with current historiographical trends. For this reason, the organizers of the 4th International Conference on Medieval Europe in Motion deemed it appropriate to take our principal concern a step further and propose as its main subject the question whether or not it is possible to speak of a Global Middle Ages.
The Conference will seek to provide a forum for scholars from all disciplines who are willing to examine this topic. We invite participation from graduate students, early-career researchers and senior scholars. Papers are warmly welcome whether in English, Portuguese, Spanish, French or Italian.
The three sections of the Conference will be:
1. Debating the Global Middle Ages: Theoretical and Historiographical Approaches;
2. Texts, Images and Representations;
3. Territories and Powers: a “Glocal” Perspective.
Possible topics may include, but are by no means restricted to, the following:
• approaches to sub-global, semi-global and pan-global concepts and the discussion of contact,
exchange, interaction, circulation, integration and exclusion;
• analysis of concepts and case studies concerning diffusion, outreach, dispersal and expansion;
• approaches to concepts of impact, reception, acceptance, transformation and reform.
Selected proceedings will be edited by the Institute of Medieval Studies, as a peer-reviewed e-book, during the course of 2018.

 

Edinburgh College of Art Trecento seminar, Artist and Authorship (6 May 2016)

Scultore, Firenze, Museo Bardini3 (1)6th May 2016
10:00 – 17:00
Hunter Lecture Theatre, Edinburgh College of Art, 74, Lauriston Place , Edinburgh

Convened by Claudia Bolgia and Luca Palozzi from the School of History of Art

This one-day international research seminar on ‘Artist and Authorship’ is designed to take stock of the field, showcase award-winning, original research and discuss different methodologies, thus charting new avenues for future research. While the research seminar’s main focus of attention is the Italian Trecento, contributions reach well beyond it to investigate different geographical areas – both East and West (Portugal, France, Spain, Byzantium) – across a broader timespan, including contemporary perspectives on the topic.

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL.

BOOK YOUR FREE TICKET(S) HERE. LIMITED CAPACITY

Programme

10.00 – 10.15 Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art), Introduction

Session 1: Visual Networks and Artistic Flows

Chair: Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art)

10.15 – 10.40 Emanuele Lugli (University of York), ‘Inventing the Network: Linking Figures and Connecting Knowledge in Trecento Italy’

10.40 – 11.05 Carla Varela Fernandes (Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal), ‘France-Catalonia-Portugal: artistic flows in the Trecento. Some examples from the Digital Index of Magistri Cataloniae’

11.05 – 11.20 Q&A

11.20 – 11.40 Coffee break

Session 2: Authorship and Self-Representation: East and West

Chair: Claudia Bolgia (Edinburgh College of Art)

11.40 – 12.05 Maria Lidova (British Museum, University of Oxford), ‘Manifestations of Authorship: Artists’ Signatures in Byzantium’

12.05 – 12.30 Giampaolo Ermini (Scuola Normale Superiore, Italy), ‘The Opere firmate nell’arte italiana / Medioevo Project : some notes on Sienese metalworkers’ signatures: goldsmiths, locksmiths, bell makers’

12.30 – 12.55 Donal Cooper (University of Cambridge), ‘The Authorship and Audience of the Meditations of the Life of Christ’

12.55 – 13.10 Q&A

13.10 – 14.00 Lunch

Session 3: Self-awareness and Reception

Chair: Claudia Bolgia (Edinburgh College of Art)

14.00 – 14.25 Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art), ‘Before the Paragone: Trecento Visual Intelligence and the Critical Misfortune of Sculptors’

14.25 – 14.50 Corin Sworn (Artist and Lecturer, Ruskin School of Art, Oxford), ‘The Mobile Screen and the Early Modern Stage: A contemporary artist’s take on borrowing from the past’

14.50 – 15.00 Q&A

15.00 – 15.20 Coffee break

Session 4: Postgraduate Research Showcase, Discussion and Conclusions

Chairs: Claudia Bolgia (Edinburgh College of Art), Robert Gibbs (University of Glasgow), John Richards (University of Glasgow), Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art)

15.20 – 15.50 Research Showcase with History of Art PhD candidates at the University of Edinburgh

Maria Gordusenko, ‘Magester Ursus and his self-representation in the church of Santi Pietro e Paolo in Ferentillo’
Amelia Hope-Jones, ‘The Elusive Artist: A Thirteenth-Century Tabernacle in the National Gallery of Scotland’
Fabian Bojkovsky, ‘A Jewish Convert as Artist: The Shrine of San Vicente, Sabina and Cristeta at the Intersection between Legend, Historicity and Propaganda’
15.50 – 16.20 Discussion

16.20 Claudia Bolgia (Edinburgh College of Art), Conclusions

For all enquiries, please email: luca.palozzi@ed.ac.uk.