Tag Archives: Tomb Sculpture

Call for Contributions: English Alabaster Sculptures in Context: Art, History and Historiography (edited volume)

english_-_resurrection_-_walters_27308The book aims at challenging the current limits within the field of research related to English alabasters, in order to establish a new model of study. Over the last century many studies on English alabasters have been published, including exhibition catalogues, list of documents and archival sources, catalogues raisonnés of the most important collections. All these studies have marked key points in the scholarly approach to English alabaster carvings, but they have also imposed a stubbornly curt historiographical perspective. Indeed, these publications have mainly been focused on specific collections -e.g. Frances Cheetham’s Medieval English alabaster carvings in the Castle Museum of Nottingham (Nottingham, 1973)-, and have thus provided only a partial view on that artistic phenomenon. They ended up isolating English alabasters from their historical and cultural context. In addition, as Susan Ward has pointed out in her review to Frances Cheetham’s Alabaster Images of Medieval England (Speculum, 2006), these publications’ main focus was often traditional: their bulks describe the standard subject matters found in the alabasters (e.g. the Passion of Christ, the Life of the Virgin and the saints) and explain the literary sources of that subject matter in a sometime too basic way. The authors tend to isolate the pieces from their wider historical framework, lacking to consider the character of piety in late-medieval England, and failing to consider the sculptures from a comprehensive historiographical point of view.

The book aims at setting the study of English alabasters on a new footing, which results from the influence of previous scholarship but, at the same time, reacts against it and is finally capable to establish a different approach.

Possible themes and subjects could address, but are not limited to one of the following topics

  • Alabaster altarpieces: function and design
  • Alabasters in pre/post Reformation England
  • Centres of productions, Trade routes
  • Workshop practices (Collaborations and Co-creations; Process and Method; Marks and Inscriptions; Archival records)
  • Reception of alabasters abroad; Possible adaption to local practices/taste
  • Patronage
  • Paraliturgical Dramas
  • Distinctions between rural/urban churches
  • Alabaster tombs

Papers will be collected in a volume to be published by the end of next year (2018), entitled English Alabaster Sculptures in Context: Art, History and Historiography. Submission: Please send an abstract of your proposed contribution (ca. 300 words) and a short CV to the editor: zuleika.murat@unipd.it.

Deadline: April 1, 2017.

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Murray Seminar: 5.00pm, 20th January 2016 Birkbeck

Zuleika Murat, ‘I have not seen more precious tombs and burials with greater pomp’: Guariento and the Tomb of Doge Giovanni Dolfin in Santi Giovanni e Paolo, Venice

The splendid tomb of Doge Giovanni Dolfin in the Basilica dei Santi Giovanni e Paolo in Venice once consisted of a hanging canopy and tomb by Andrea da San Felice and decorations by the famous painter Guariento.  Dr. Murat proposes a new hypothesis and a visual reconstruction of this important monument in one of Venice’s most significant locations.

All seminars this term are held at 5pm in the Keynes Library at Birkbeck’s School of Arts (Room 114, 43, Gordon Sq., London, WC1H OPD). A break at 5.50pm is followed by discussion and refreshments.

Conference: Medieval Tombs and their Spatial Contexts. Strategies of Commemoration in Christianity and Islam, University of Tubingen (18-20 February 2016)

Leeds 2015 CFP - voices from the grave-1Medieval Tombs and their Spatial Contexts. Strategies of Commemoration in Christianity and Islam

University of Tubingen, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Alte Burse, Bursagasse 1, Raum X, 72070 Tübingen, Germany,

Conference: February 18 – 20, 2016. Registration deadline: Feb 15, 2016

The idea that the shaping of tombs and funeral places goes beyond aspects of personal welfare and mirrors social functions and meanings of commemoration up to political claims is very popular in medieval research and leaves its mark on examples from Christian and Islamic contexts likewise. Beside an enhanced interest in ritual integration, recent investigations show a wider perspective on concrete location and spatial situation as main factor for the understanding of tombs and their function. As a result, space is interpreted beyond physical boundaries and frames as a relational definition based on social construct in the sense of collective perception, use and appropriation. The conference will give the opportunity to discuss these approaches within comparative perspectives on medieval objects, buildings and places of commemoration in Christianity and Islam. The focus lies on the relevance and the integration of tombs as places and spaces of formative and constitutive character in both religious cultures.

Registration now open:
http://www.transculturalstudies.ch/en/index/conferences/conference-tuebingen/registration.html

Programme

Kunsthistorisches Institut der Universität Tübingen, Alte Burse, Bursagasse 1, Raum X, 72070 Tübingen

Thursday, 18.02.2016

13.45 Opening remarks

Francine Giese, Zürich / Kristina Seizinger, Jens Brückner, Markus Thome, Tübingen

Section I – Workshop des Graduiertenkollegs „Religiöses Wissen im vormodernen Europa“ Grabmaltopographien: Konstruktion und Wahrnehmung sakraler Orte und sozialer Distinktion

14.00 Jens Brückner, Tübingen

„Deus in cuius miseratione animae fidelium requiescunt…“ – die
liturgische Inszenierung von Grabmälern in Dom und Stadt Augsburg

14.45 Sebastian Scholz, Zürich

Totengedenken, Selbstdarstellung und Frömmigkeitspraxis im Spiegel der Inschriften vom 6. bis zum 15. Jahrhundert

15.30 Coffee break

16.00 Kristina Seizinger, Tübingen

Wer erhielt ein Denkmal in der Kirche? Standortwahl und Visualisierungsstrategien sozialer Gruppen zwischen Tradition und Wandel

16.45 Markus Hörsch, Leipzig

Die Zisterzienserabteikirche Heilsbronn – Hohenzollern-Grablege und Abbild höfischer Hierarchie
18.15 Keynote Lecture

Tanja Michalsky, Rom

“Napoli (…) che é pietosissima verso li suoi passati, ali quali ogn’hora edifica sepolcri, fabrica sepolture, inalza marmi, statue et colossi …“.Die historiographische Erfassung der Grabmalstopographie im Neapel der Frühen Neuzeit

19.30 Apéro

20.45 Night visit: Die Tübinger Stiftskirche als Begräbnisort

Friday, 19.02.2016
Section II
Location of the sepulchral monument: appropriaton and construction of commemoration places

09.00 Xenia Stolzenburg, Marburg

Sieben Kirchen für ein Stiftergrab. Santo Sepolcro in Mailand im
Spiegel des Stiftungsdokumentes um 1030

09.30 Richard McClary, Edinburgh

On a Holy Mountain? Remote and Elevated Funerary Monuments in Medieval
Islam

10.00 Patricia Blessing, Stanford

Urban Space Beyond the Walls: Siting Islamic Funerary Complexes in Konya

Coffee break

11.00 Susanna Blaser, Zürich

Die programmatische Einbindung der Königinnen-Grabmäler in die
dynastische Nekropole in Saint-Denis bis zur Mitte des 15. Jahrhunderts

11.30 Eva Leistenschneider, Ulm

Aux piez et au plus près de la sepulture de nostre corps… – Die Gräber
von Familienmitgliedern und Höflingen des Königs in der
Herrschergrablege Saint-Denis

12.00 Fozia Parveen, Harrogate

Mythmaking, Symbols and Topography: The Ottoman Tombs of Selim I,
Suleiman I and Selim II

Lunch break

Section III
Shaping concepts: construction of meaning through formal, spatial and ritual reference frames

14.00 Francine Giese, Zürich

The Capilla Real in Córdoba. Transcultural Exchange in Medieval Spain

14.30 Antje Fehrmann, Berlin

Das Grabmal als Prozess: Form, Raum, Liturgie und Rezeption am englischen Königs- und Königinnengrabmal

Coffee break

15.30 Jessica Barker, London

Voices from the Grave: Tomb Monuments and Sound in Late-Medieval England

16.00 Sami L. De Giosa, London

The crosses of the Sultan: Sultan Qaytbay’s complex (1472-1474) and the mystery of two decorative elements carved in stone

16.30 Stefan Bürger, Würzburg

Zu den lokalen, liturgischen, historischen, genealogischen, baukulturellen und bautechnischen Kontexten der Grablege Bischof Thilo von Throtas im Merseburger Dom

18.15 Keynote lecture

Doris Behrens-Abouseif, London

Between written and unwritten testimonies: The Christian influences on
the mausoleum of Sultan Qalawun in Cairo

19.30 Conference dinner

Saturday, 20.02.2016

09.00 Markus Thome, Tübingen

Kathedralen als Gedächtnisräume. Das Bischofsgrabmal und die Visualisierung liturgischer Gemeinschaft im Spätmittelalter

09.30 Jörg Richter, Hannover

Eine Kathedrale ohne Bischöfe? Memorialtopographie und Memorialkalender am Halberstädter Dom im 15. Jahrhundert

Coffee break

Section IV
Political strategies: Power issues and sepulchral monuments as means of formation of identity

10.30 Barbara Franzé, Lausanne

Das Grabmosaik der Abtei von Saint-Bertin in Saint Omer (1109): Der Ausdruck der gräflichen Autorität zur Zeit der gregorianischen Reform

11.00 Christina Vossler-Wolf, Tübingen

Von Stiftern und Mönchen – Grablegen und monastische Raumkonzepte am Beispiel des ehemaligen Zisterzienserklosters Bebenhausen

11.30 Claudia Jentzsch, Berlin

„Florentiner Bescheidenheit“? Raumordnungen und Regulierungen der Begräbniskultur in spätmittelalterlichen Florentiner Sakralräumen

Lunch break

13.30 Sara Mondini, Venedig

A widespread ‘taste for the macabre’, apotropaic or political marks? Urbanism, landscapes and funerary architecture in the Indian Sultanates

14.00 Anna Pawlik, Köln

Ort des Gedenkens, Ort der Repräsentation. Das patrizische Grabmal im Spätmittelalter

14.30 Peyman Eshaghi, Karaj

From a Familial Grave to a National Shrine: Fundamental Changings in the Position of Safi-ad-din Ardabili’s tomb during the Safavid Dynasty in Iran

15.00 Final discussion

 

Registration deadline: Feb 15, 2016

Study day: Monumental Brass Society at Battle, East Sussex (28 March 2015)

John Wythines, S.T.D., born at Chester, fellow of Brasenose College, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, Dean of Battle for 42 years, 1615, aged 84, in cap, gown and scarf holding a book. Reproduced by permission of the Monumental Brass Society

John Wythines, S.T.D., born at Chester, fellow of Brasenose College, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, Dean of Battle for 42 years, 1615, aged 84, in cap, gown and scarf holding a book. Reproduced by permission of the Monumental Brass Society

The church of St Mary the Virgin, Battle, was established by Abbot Ralph c. 1115 on the battlefield of 1066. The church includes a magnificent transitional nave, a rare wall painting of St Margaret of Antioch of c.1300 and the gilded and painted alabaster tomb of Sir Anthony Browne (1548) who acquired the abbey at the Dissolution. The earliest surviving brass is for Sir John Lowe (1426) with a distinctive memento mori inscription

Brasses for the deans of Battle; Robert Clere, engraved c.1430, and John Wythines, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford, and Dean of Battle for 42 years, who died in 1615 are to be found north and south area of the sanctuary respectively.

This meeting, on Saturday 28th March 2015, is free for members and non-members of the Society.

Programme:

2.00p.m. Welcome
by Martin Stuchfield, President of the Monumental Brass Society

2.05p.m. St Mary’s Church Battle
by Clifford Braybrooke

2.30p.m. The Brasses of Battle Church
by Robert Hutchinson

3.00p.m. The Monument to Sir Anthony Browne and his wife, Alice Gage
by Nigel Llewellyn

3.30p.m. Tour of the church and viewing of the brasses and monuments led by Pat Roberts

4.15 Tea

The Church will be open prior to the meeting.

St Mary’s Church is located in Upper Lake in the centre of Battle with ample parking in the vicinity. The postcode for satellite navigation is TN33 0AN. The nearest station is Battle (served from London: London Bridge).

(Updated) Conference Programme: Fifty Years after Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture (London, 21 June 2014)

(Updated) Conference Programme:
Fifty Years after Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture.
New Approaches, New Perspectives, New Material

Saturday 21 June 2014, 10.00 – 18.00 (with registration from 09.30)
Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

Tomb Sculpture will remain….among the basic works which determine turning points in the history of our discipline’. (Review in Art Bulletin, 1967).

The Courtauld Institute will be holding a one-day conference in 2014 to mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Erwin Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture: Four Lectures on its Changing Aspects from Ancient Egypt to Bernini, comprising the lectures delivered originally in the fall of 1956 at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York. Panofsky’s lectures represented a new attempt to consider funerary monuments as artistic objects, charting developments in their iconography, style, form and function within the broader chronology of art history. Panofsky also emphasised the importance of tombs as evidence for changing (and sometimes contradictory) attitudes towards the deceased.

Examining monuments across Europe, from the Medieval to Early Modern periods, this conference will explore the legacy of Panofsky’s work as well as showcase the developments in research techniques and approaches that have led to new insights into tomb sculpture.

Ticket/Entry Details: £16 (£11 students, Courtauld staff/students, concessions). Please note that online booking for this event has now closed. However, limited places will be available on the day on a first come, first served basis (cash payment only).

For further information: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/calendar.shtml

Organised by Professor Susie Nash, Ann Adams and Jessica Barker (The Courtauld Institute of Art).
Batalha

PROGRAMME

09.30 – 10.00 Registration

10.00 – 10.40 Professor Susie Nash (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
Welcome and Introduction: Erwin Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture. Four lectures on its changing aspects from Ancient Egypt to Bernini (1964).

10.40 – 11.00 Break for refreshments (provided – Seminar Room 1)

SESSION 1: Reassessing Panofsky (Chair: Ann Adams)

11.00 – 11.25 Shirin Fozi (University of Pittsburgh): ‘From the ‘pictorial’ to the ‘statuesque’: Rudolf of Swabia, Widukind of Saxony, and the Problem of Plastic Form

11.25 – 11.50 Geoff Nuttall (Independent Scholar): ‘Delicate to the point of evanescence’: Panofsky, Ilaria del Carretto and Jacopo della Quercia

11.50 – 12.15 Jessica Barker (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Prospective and Retrospective: Joint Memorials in the Middle Ages

12.15 – 12.30 Panel questions

12.30 – 13.30 Lunch (not provided)

SESSION 2: New Approaches, New Perspectives, New Material (Chair: Michaela Zöschg)

13.30 – 13.55 Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art): ‘To Carve a Living Person out of Stone’: Petrarch, Pandolfo Malatesta, and the Origins of the Renaissance Humanist Tomb in Fourteenth-Century Italy

13.55 – 14.20 Christina Welch (University of Winchester): Cadaver monuments in England

14.20 – 14.45 James Cameron (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Competing for ‘dextro cornu magnum altaris’: Tombs and Liturgical Seating in English Churches

14.45 – 15.00 Panel questions

15.00 – 15.30 Break for refreshments (provided – Seminar Room 1)

SESSION 3: Reconstruction, Materials and Conservation (Chair: Kim Woods)

15.30 – 15.45 Kim Woods (The Open University): Introduction on materials

15.45 – 16.10 Martha Dunkelman (Canisius College): Deconstructing Donatello’s Brancacci Chapel

16.10 – 16.35 Marisa Costa (University of Lisbon): Does technical investigation fully answer art history questions? The case study of a Portuguese copper tomb from the early fifteenth century.

16.35 – 16.50 Panel questions

16.50 – 17.00 Summary: Ann Adams & Jessica Barker

17.00 – 18.00 Dr Phillip Lindley (University of Leicester)
Keynote: Taking leave of Panofsky

18.00 RECEPTION (Front Hall)

 

Conference: Fifty Years After Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture. New Approaches, new Perspectives, New Material, London

TombofKingJohnIandQueenPhilippa_Batalha_000The Courtauld Institute of Art is holding this one-day conference in 2014 to mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Erwin Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture: Four Lectures on its Changing Aspects from Ancient Egypt to Bernini, comprising the lectures delivered originally in the fall of 1956 at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York. Panofsky’s lectures represented a new attempt to consider funerary monuments as artistic objects, charting developments in their iconography, style, form and function within the broader chronology of art history. Panofsky also emphasised the importance of tombs as evidence for changing (and sometimes contradictory) attitudes towards the deceased.

Examining monuments across Europe, from the Medieval to Early Modern periods, this conference will explore the legacy of Panofsky’s work as well as showcase the developments in research techniques and approaches that have led to new insights into tomb sculpture.

Saturday, 21 June 2014 10.00 – 18.00 (with registration from 09.30), Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Jessica Barker (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Marisa Costa (University of Lisbon), Martha Dunkelman (Canisius College), Shirin Fozi (University of Pittsburgh), Dr Phillip Lindley (University of Leicester), Professor Susie Nash (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Geoff Nuttall (Independent Scholar), Luca Palozzi (Edinburgh College of Art), Joana Ramôa Melo (New University of Lisbon), Christina Welch (University of Winchester), Kim Woods (The Open University)

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2014/summer/jun21_FiftyYearsAfterPanofsky.shtml

 

Call for papers: Commemoration of the Dead: New Approaches, New Perspectives, New Material; London

Brass_of_Simon_de_Felbrigge_and_wife_St_Margaret's_Church_Felbrigg_Norfolk

Call for Papers for Commemoration of the Dead: New Approaches, New Perspectives, New Material conference to be held 10.00- 17.00, Saturday 15 November 2014 at the Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Proposals are invited for papers to be presented at a one-day conference, jointly sponsored by the Monumental Brass Society and the Church Monuments Society. The aim of this event is to showcase the developments in research techniques and approaches that have led to new insights into monumental brasses.

This follows a conference, ‘Fifty Years after Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture: New Approaches, New Perspectives, New Materials’ to be held at the Courtauld Institute of Art on 21 June 2014. Panofsky, in his lavishly illustrated Tomb Sculpture, included the illustration of only a single brass (Pl. 212), that of the hand-holding Sir Edward Cerne and Lady Elyne Cerne, Draycott Cerne, Wilts. The ‘Commemoration of the Dead’ conference will address this imbalance by examining the significance of monumental brasses within the broader context of funerary art, especially the connections and divergences between brasses and other forms of tomb sculpture.

The core period covered by the conference will be Medieval to Early Modern, but papers up to the current day will be considered. The core geographic focus will be Europe.

Papers are invited on a wider range of topics arising from the study of monumental brasses, and could include:

• Individual brasses – style, location, patronage, production

• Groups of brasses united by a common theme

• Materials and their symbolic importance

• Function of brasses- prospective/retrospective, devotional, legal, etc.

• Audience and reception

• Brasses and the liturgy

• Inscriptions, epitaphs, heraldry

• Technical investigation

Logistics:

• Length of paper: 20 minutes

• Expenses: limited funds are available to cover speakers’ expenses

This is an opportunity for doctoral and early post-doctoral students to share their research. It is intended (subject to quality and peer review) to publish a joint collection of edited essays from the two conferences.

Please send proposals of no more than 250 words and a brief biography to

tombsculpture@gmail.com by 18 May.

Organised by: Christian Steer, Hon. Secretary, Monumental Brass Society, Ann Adams & Jessica Barker, PhD Candidates, The Courtauld Institute of Art.