Tag Archives: printing

Book round-up: A History of the Gutenberg Bible

EditioPrincepsEditio princeps
A History of the Gutenberg Bible

By Eric Marshall White

 ISBN 978-1-909400-84-9

 

The Gutenberg Bible is widely recognized as Europe’s first printed book, a book that forever changed the world. However, despite its initial impact, fame was fleeting: for the better part of three centuries the Bible was virtually forgotten; only after two centuries of tenacious and contentious scholarship did it attain its iconic status as a monument of human invention. Editio princeps: A History of the Gutenberg Bible is the first book to tell the whole story of Europe’s first printed edition, describing its creation at Mainz circa 1455, its impact on fifteenth-century life and religion, its fall into oblivion during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and its rediscovery and rise to worldwide fame during the centuries thereafter. This comprehensive study examines the forty-nine surviving Gutenberg Bibles, and fragments of at least fourteen others, in the chronological order in which they came to light. Combining close analysis of material clues within the Bibles themselves with fresh documentary discoveries, the book reconstructs the history of each copy in unprecedented depth, from its earliest known context through every change of ownership up to the present day. Along the way it introduces the colorful cast of proud possessors, crafty booksellers, observant travelers, and scholarly librarians who shaped our understanding of Europe’s first printed book. Bringing the ‘biographies’ of all the Gutenberg Bibles together for the first time, this richly illustrated study contextualizes both the historic cultural impact of the editio princeps and its transformation into a world treasure.

 

Eric Marshall White, PhD, became Curator of Rare Books at Princeton University Library in 2015 after eighteen years as Curator of Special Collections at Southern Methodist University’s Bridwell Library. A specialist in early European printing, he has published numerous articles and exhibition catalogues on rare books.

 

 

More Info: http://bit.ly/2kuyQW8

Grants: Printing Historical Society : Research Grants 2018

printing-historical-society

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CFP: Recasting Reproduction (1500-1800) (London, 18 Nov 17)

The contested concept of “reproduction” stands at a critical nexus of
the conceptualisation of Early Modern artistic thought. The early
modern period has been characterised by the development of novel and
efficient reproduction technologies, as well as the emergence of global
empires, growing interconnectedness through trade, warfare and
conquest, and the rise of new markets and cultures of collecting. This
ethos of innovation and cultural exchange was, however, contextualised
against myriad contemporary ideologies still rooted in the values and
legends of narratives of the past. Reproduction stood at the centre of
this dichotomy. Set against the context of changing cultural tastes and
the increasingly overlapping public and private spheres,
‘reproductions’ were involved within changing viewing practices,
artistic pedagogy, acts of homage and collecting.

The idea of reproduction connotes a number of tensions: between
authenticity and counterfeit; consumption and production; innovation
and imitation; the establishment of archetype and the creation of
replica; the conceptual value of the original and the worth of the
reproduction as a novel work of art; the display of contextualised
knowledge and the de-contextualisation of the prototype. At the same
time, production is shaped historically through practices and
discourses, and has figured as a key site for analysis in the work of,
for example, Walter Benjamin, Richard Wolin, Richard Etlin, Ian Knizek
and Yvonne Sheratt. Participants are invited to explore reproduction
‘beyond Benjamin’, investigating both the technical and philosophical
implications of reproducing a work of art and seeking, where possible,
a local anchoring for the physical and conceptual processes involved.

We welcome proposals for papers that investigate the theme of
reproduction from the early modern period (c.1500-1800), including
painting, print making, sculpture, decorative arts, architecture,
graphic arts and the intersections between them. Papers can explore
artistic exchanges across geopolitical, cultural and disciplinary
divides and contributions from other disciplines, such as the history
of science and conservation, are welcome. Topics for discussion may
include, but are not limited to:

The conceptualisation and processes of reproduction and reproduction
technologies before and at the advent of ‘the mechanical’;
Reproduction in artistic traditions beyond ‘the West’;
The slippage between innovation and imitation;
Part-reproduction and the changing, manipulation and developments of
certain motifs;
Problematizing the aura of ‘authenticity’ and the ‘value’ of the
original, copies and collecting;
Fakes and the de-contextualisation of a work through its reproduction;
Reproduction within non-object based study e.g. architecture;
Theoretical alternatives and the vocabulary used to describe the
process and results of reproduction in contemporary texts.
Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a 150 word
biography by 6th July 2017 to kyle.leyden@courtauld.ac.uk and
natasha.morris@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by Kyle Leyden, Natasha Morris and Angela Benza (The
Courtauld Institute of Art)

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Recasting Reproduction (1500–1800) (London, 18 Nov 17). In:
H-ArtHist, Jun 6, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/15728>.

CFPs: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017

tumblr_nid8xdrz0n1soj7s4o4_500Call for Papers: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017
Deadline: October 25, 2016

For more information on panels, round-tables, short presentations and working groups, and for submission guidelines, see: http://rarebookschool.org/bibliography-conference-2017/

Bibliography Among the Disciplines, a four-day international conference to be held in Philadelphia from 12 to 15 October 2017, will bring together scholarly professionals poised to address current problems pertaining to the study of textual artifacts that cross scholarly, pedagogical, professional, and curatorial domains. The conference will explore theories and methods common to the object-oriented disciplines, such as anthropology and archaeology, but new to bibliography. The Bibliography Among the Disciplines program, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to promote focused cross-disciplinary exchange and future scholarly collaborations. The conference sessions will include both traditional and innovative formats: plenary addresses, short presentations, roundtables, workshops, working groups, and site visits. Calls for Proposals and Participants (CFPs) are listed below. The project will culminate in 2019 with a volume of essays contributed by conference participants. The conference and subsequent volume will seek to build on the ongoing series of symposia conducted by Rare Book School’s Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography, established in 2012 through funding from the Foundation.

Call for Papers- Panels:

Graphic Representation: Illustration & Diagrams
Session Organizers: Claire Eager (University of Virginia), Jeannie Kenmotsu (University of Pennsylvania)

Textual Instruments
Session Organizer: Nick Wilding (Georgia State University)

Questions of Scale, Production & Labor
Session Organizer: Juliet Sperling (University of Pennsylvania)

Transmission & Transfer of Images
Session Organizer: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley

Degradation, Loss, Recovery & Fragmentation
Session Organizer: Jane Raisch (University of California, Berkeley)

Materiality of Digital Objects
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

The Social Life of Books: Uses of Text & Image Beyond Reading & Viewing
Session Organizers: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley), Hannah Marcus (Harvard University), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Books as Agents of Contact
Session Organizers: Hansun Hsiung (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science), András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Yael Rice (Amherst College)

Manuscript in the Age of Print
Session Organizers: Rachael King (University of California, Santa Barbara), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation
Session Organizer: Lauren Jennings (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Comparative Histories of the Book
Session Organizers: Megan McNamee (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Reappraising the Redundant: The Value of Copies in the Study of Textual Artifacts
Session Organizer: Kappy Mintie (University of California, Berkeley)n and

Call for Papers – Roundtables:

Performance, Textuality & Orality
Session Organizer: Glenda Goodman (University of Pennsylvania)

Authorship
Session Organizers: András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Digitization, Representation & Access
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

Materiality as a Sustainable Humanistic Discourse
Session Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Ethics & Responsibility in the Bibliosphere
Session Organizer: Claire Eager (University of Virginia)

 Call for papers – Short Presentations:

Tools for Data Analysis & Visualization
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

Innovative Pedagogy with Material Objects
Session Organizer: Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Teaching Global Book History
Session Organizers: Devin Fitzgerald (Harvard University) & Ben Nourse (University of Denver)

Dynamics of Digital Collections
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

The Book and Its Time: Developing a ‘Period Eye’
Session Organizer: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire (Winterthur Museum)

Call for Papers: Working Groups:

Globalizing Book History & Bibliography
Working Group Organizers: Hwisang Cho (Xavier University), Ben Nourse (University of Denver), Rachel Stein (Columbia University in the City of New York)

Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines
Working Group Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Courtney Roby (Cornell University)