Tag Archives: Workshop

Looking back: Medieval & Early Modern Festival, University of Kent, June 2017

The 16th-17th June 2017 was the third annual MEMS Festival, a two-day celebration of all things Medieval and Early Modern at the University of Kent. Papers covered all kinds of topics, from art and literature to politics, identity, and everyday life from the entire period. The range of material meant that lots of different areas of expertise were brought together, leading to interesting discussions and comparisons. There were also lots of exciting practical workshops, such as a “mystery trail” in the Special Collections and Archives and workshopping a scene from the York Corpus Christi play with Claire Wright (University of Kent).

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Kent undergraduate students present their final year dissertations

The two dedicated medieval art sessions covered objects from far and wide. The first panel looked at style and symbolism over the artistic networks in England and France. Cassandra Harrington (University of Kent) gave probably a paper on foliate head keystones, looking at a particular example from the chapter house at Cluny, and distinguishing them from the usual interpretation of such heads as “Green Men”. Angela Websdale’s (University of Kent) paper on the “lost” wall paintings at Faversham Cathedral investigated a potential Westminster workshop moving between London and Kent, while Alice Ball’s (University of Kent) considered images of the Prodigal Son, in particular how the iconography of the windows at Chartres cathedral may have influenced the Bibles Moralisees.

The second medieval art panel was made up of three students who had just finished their undergraduate degrees at the University of Kent, who all presented on their recently-completed dissertations. Michael Gittins gave a fresh look at a well-known object, considering the heraldry and weapons pictured in the Morgan Picture Bible to make a convincing argument that Walter of Brienne may have been the original patron. In contrast, Lucy Splarn’s paper turned towards a tiny and much less well-known pilgrimage badge of St Thomas Becket, looking at the unusual iconography of the saint riding a peacock (see embedded 3D model). This could have been a representation of Thomas’s personality, and the idea that he was arrogant in his outward appearance but humble inside, which tied in well with Paul Binski’s paper at the Thomas Becket study day on the concept of personality in the Middle Ages. Catherine Heydon gave the third paper, on the idea of Purgatory in the thought of St Augustine, thinking about the way in which the imagery of Classical thought influenced the theology of the early Church.

Medieval and Early Modern art made an appearance in other sessions as well. Hannah Straw (University of Kent) gave a paper on the imagery of Charles II’s escape in the Boswell Oak tree and how it was used to shape the king’s public identity. Emily Guerry (University of Kent) also looked at public identity and the use of history, by examining the significance of James Comey’s (mis)quotation of Henry II in his testimony, and the way in which the past can be used in the public imagination.

Each afternoon of the conference was taken up with activities and workshops, which was a great opportunity to get some hands-on work with objects and new technologies. This included a set of workshops and a tour of Eastbridge Pilgrim’s Hospital, which would have been a stopping point for hundreds of visitors to St Thomas’s shrine. Despite the ancient surroundings, two of these were on new technologies for approaching medieval objects and buildings, using GIS mapping and 3D modelling to see medieval art in a new way. Amy Jeffs (Digital Pilgrim Project) led a workshop on digitising pilgrim souvenirs and using software to enable better study and public appreciation of objects which are usually difficult to access, leading to a discussion on the benefits and potential issues of digitalisation. Tim Beach also used technologies to explore medieval art, but on a much larger scale, demonstrating how 3D laser scanning can be used to make a perfect 3D digital representation of medieval buildings, performing a live demonstration on the undercroft of Eastbridge Hospital itself.

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Attendees take part  in a workshop in the Eastbridge Hospital Chapel

The whole conference was an exciting look at new research and approaches to medieval and early modern history, and the diverse mix of papers meant that lots of interesting discussions were happening all through the weekend, finishing up in the beautiful space of Eastbridge Hospital. The festival showcased the new research in the History of Art emerging from the University of Kent, both in relation to the wealth of local art around Canterbury itself, and the international nature of work being done, with a particular focus on the art of France and networks between France and England.    

Review by Han Tame

Postgraduate, University of Kent

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Conf: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era, University of Birmingham, 24-25 February 2017

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Conference: 
Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era
University of Birmingham
24-25 February 2017

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

24 Feb 2017 – 1st day
14.00-14.10 – Opening remarks: prof Leslie Brubaker, University of Birmingham
14.10-15.00 First Keynote lecture and discussion: Dr Cecily Hilsdale, McGill University, Title TBC
15.00-16.00 First panel – Chair Dr Ruth Macrides, University of Birmingham
Ivana Jevtic: Late Byzantine Painting Reconsidered: Art in Decline or Art in the Age of Decline?
Andrew Griebeler: The Greek Botanical Albums in Late Byzantine and Early Ottoman Constantinople
Maria Alessia Rossi: Political ruin or spiritual renewal? Early Palaiologan art in context
16.00-16.20 Discussion
16.30-16.50 Coffee break
17.00-17.50 Second Keynote lecture and discussion: prof Niels Gaul, University of Edinburgh: Palaiologan Byzantium(s): East Rome’s Final Two Centuries in Recent Research
18.00-19.00 Reception

25 Feb 2017 – 2nd day
9.00-9.50 Opening keynote lecture and discussion: Dr Angeliki Lymberopoulou, Open University, Palaiologan art from regional Crete: artistic decline or social progress?
10.00 -10.40 Second panel – Chair Dr Daniel Reynolds, University of Birmingham Anđela Gavrilović: The Stylistic Features of the Frescoes of the Church of the Mother of God Hodegetria in the Patriarchate of Peć (c. 1335-1337)
Ludovic Bender: Mistra and its countryside: The transformation of the late Byzantine religious landscape of Laconia
10.40-11.00 Discussion
11.00-11.20 Coffee break
11.30-12.30 Third Panel – Chair Dr Francesca Dell’Acqua, University of Birmingham Andrea Mattiello: Who’s that man? The perception of Byzantium in 15th century Italy
Tatiana Bardashova: Palaiologan Influence on the Visual Representation of the Grand Komnenoi in the Empire of Trebizond (1204-1461)
Lilyana Yordanova: The Issues of Visual Narrative, Literary Patronage and Display of Virtues of a Bulgarian Tsar in the Fourteenth century
12.30-12.50 Discussion
13.00-14.00 Lunch break

Workshop
14.10-14.50 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
14.50-15.30 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
15.40-16.00 Coffee break
16.10-16.50 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
16.50-17.00 Closing remarks: Andrea Mattiello/Maria Alessia Rossi

The programme, further information and details of how to book can be found at:

and
http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/bomgs/events/2017/reconsidering-palaiologan-arts.aspx

CFP: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era

palaiologos-to-deleteCFP: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era, One day and a half Symposium & Worshop, University of Birmingham, February, 24-25, 2017.
Deadline: 30 September 2016

 

Organisers: Andrea Mattiello – University of Birmingham
Maria Alessia Rossi – The Courtauld Institute of Art

Keynote Speakers: Niels Gaul – University of Edinburgh
Cecily Hilsdale – McGill University
Angeliki Lymberopoulou – The Open University

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire, such as the Adriatic and Balkan regions, the major islands of Cyprus and Crete, and the regions surrounding the cities of Constantinople, Thessaloniki, and Mystras. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

In its last centuries, the political entity of the Empire of the Romaioi released cultural and artistic energies migrating towards new frontiers of intellectual achievements. The intent is to counter-balance the innovation of these works of art with the notion of decline and the narrative of decay frequently acknowledged for this period; and to promote an understanding of transformation where previous cultural heritages were integrated into new socio-political orders.

The Symposium – hosted on the afternoon of the 24 and the morning of the 25 February – will bring together established scholars, early-career scholars, and postgraduate students. Three keynotes will provide the methodological framework for the discussion; while the selected papers will focus solely on the visual expressions and cultural trajectories of the artworks produced during the late Palaiologan Era.

The Workshop, hosted on the afternoon of the 25 February, will offer the opportunity to further the discussion in a more informal setting and for a selected number of Master students to interact and offer brief presentations.

Postgraduate students and early-career scholars are invited to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers on art and architecture history, material culture and archaeology, visual aspects of palaeography and codicology, and gender studies.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

 

– Gift exchange in view of diplomatic missions or dynastic marriages both within the Empire and with its neighbours

– Visual evidence of the interaction between the Emperor and the Patriarch

– Innovations in the visual agenda of the Palaiologan dynasty

– Aspects of religious iconography and visual representations of theological controversies, i.e. Hesychasm

– Artistic patronage and manuscript production as the outcome of dynastic and institutional interactions

– Visual and material production as the outcome of political and social circumstances, i.e. the Zealot uprising or the Unionist policy

– Evidence of artistic exchanges in the depictions of women, men, and children during the Palaiologan Era

 

How to submit: Titles of proposed papers, abstracts of 250 words, and a short CV should be sent to Maria Alessia Rossi – m.alessiarossi@icloud.com and Andrea Mattiello – axm570@bham.ac.uk by 30 September 2016.

 

New Exhibition and Events: Opus Anglicanum, Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery, V&A Museum, 1 October 2016 – 5 February 2017

opus anglicanum to deleteNew Exhibition: Opus Anglicanum: Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1 October 2016 – 5 February 2017

From the 12th to the 15th centuries, England enjoyed an international reputation for the quality of its luxury embroideries, and were frequently referred to as ‘Opus Anglicanum’ (English work). Often featuring complex imagery, and ambitious in their scale and intricacy, they were sought after by kings, queens, popes and cardinals across Europe. This exhibition is the first opportunity in over half a century to see an outstanding range of surviving examples in one place. Paintings, illuminated manuscripts, metalwork and stained glass will be shown alongside, to explore the world within which these exquisite works were created.

Luxury embroideries were made by professional craftsmen and women living in the City of London, some of whom we can still identify by name. London was a hub for commerce, and the embroiderers formed part of an international mercantile network. The rare survivals of this extraordinary period of English art are today scattered across Europe and North America. Some of the embroideries have not been seen in Britain since they were produced.

Book now: vam.ac.uk/opus


 

lossy-page1-1024px-web2c_grevens_sc3a4ngkammare-_detalj2c_grevens_sc3a4ng_-_skoklosters_slott_-_88043-tifEnglish Medieval Embroidery Unpicked, day course, The Lydia & Manfred Gorvy Lecture Theatre @V&A Museum, Saturday 12 November 2016

STUDY DAY: This study day explores the world of England’s Medieval luxury embroideries, known as Opus Anglicanum. We will examine their materials, techniques and design; the patrons and artists involved; and the extraordinary images depicted on them.

During the later Middle Ages, England enjoyed an international reputation for its luxury embroideries, produced for Europe’s greatest patrons including kings, queens, cardinals and popes. This study day will put embroideries in the exhibition Opus Anglicanum: Masters of Medieval Embroidery under the microscope, examining their materials, techniques and design; the patrons and artists involved; and exploring the extraordinary images depicted on them. Leading experts in the field will discuss these questions in what promises to be a fascinating afternoon.

With exhibition curators Glyn Davies and Sally Dormer.

14.00 – 16.30, Saturday 12 November 2016

£35 full, £30 concessions, £15 students


 20160719161621_170Opus Anglicanum: An Introduction to Silk & Gold Embroidery, Workshop, Art Studio @V&A Museum, Saturday 12 November, 10.30 – 16.30

WORKSHOP: Learn the secrets behind the beautiful embroidery techniques of Opus Anglicanum as seen in this exhibition. Sarah will guide you step by step through split stitch fillings, surface couching and underside couching with gold threads on an Opus Anglicanum inspired piece of your own, in this one day introduction to medieval embroidery. All materials included.

Saturday 12 November, 10.30 – 16.30

£92.00, £73.60 concessions

(Lead Image: The Steeple Aston Cope 1330-40 (detail). The Rector and Churchwardens of St Peter and St Paul, Steeple Aston, Oxfordshire. On long term loan to the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.)

BAA Study Day: Lincoln Cathedral Study Day ‘making and remaking’ (Lincoln, 6 October 2014)

Study Day:
BRITISH ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION 
Lincoln Cathedral Study Day ‘making and remaking’
Monday 6th October 2014, 10.15 – 16.30
Registration open until 19th September 2014 (limited spaces)

LINCOLN CATHEDRAL has for forty years had a full team of craftsmen, and has contributed to the training of workers at other cathedrals around the country. The ongoing programme of ‘making and remaking’ at Lincoln serves to inform our understanding not only of this particular building but also medieval architecture more widely.
Lincoln_Cathedral_(7435757570)Organised and led by cathedral archaeologist Professor Philip Dixon, this day school is an opportunity to visit the works department and talk to the masons, glaziers and carpenters of the works team, and see their daily work on the cathedral. In the afternoon Professor Dixon will lead a tour of the cathedral to look in detail at areas where the craftsmen’s work can be seen in situ alongside historic material.

The BAA is most grateful to Carol Heidschuster, manager of the works department, for generously hosting this study day. The cost of the day will be £20 for members. The event is free for students.

The cathedral is approx. 3/4 mile walk from Lincoln rail station; alternatively there is a taxi rank at the station. Coffee and biscuits will be provided on arrival at the cathedral works department, but participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch. The cathedral refectory will be open and serving hot and cold refreshments.

Please note: the afternoon session may involve stairs, heights, confined spaces and other potential hazards. Participants must take responsibility for their own safety at all times.

Places are limited to 20, of which 10 are reserved for students. To apply please e-mail Helen Lunnon – h.lunnon@uea.ac.uk by Friday 19th September, stating if you are a student. In the case of a greater number of applications being received than places available a ballot will be used. Successful candidates will be contacted by email on Monday 22nd September, with a request for payment.

Workshop: Catastrofi e ricostruzioni nei centri storici italiani (Florence, 15 September 2014)

Workshop:
Catastrofi e ricostruzioni nei centri storici italiani
Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut
15 September 2014

organised by Carmen Belmonte, Elisabetta Scirocco and Gerhard Wolf

Le recenti catastrofi sismiche in Abruzzo e in Emilia hanno ancora una volta mostrato la vulnerabilità del patrimonio monumentale italiano. Nonostante gli interventi istituzionali, il lavoro e l’attività scientifica dei professionisti impegnati sul campo, molteplici sono, a distanza di anni, le questioni irrisolte relative alla ricostruzione di centri storici danneggiati, ma non per questo annientati dal sisma.
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L’emergenza da catastrofe è stata più volte affrontata in Italia nell’ultimo secolo. Ma quali sono stati nel passato e quali sono oggi i principi e le linee guida da adottare nella ricostruzione?

Il Workshop del KHI, a conclusione dello Studienkurs dedicato a L’Aquila, allargherà la prospettiva di indagine ad altri centri storici colpiti da catastrofi naturali. Il coinvolgimento di studiosi impegnati in difesa del patrimonio culturale italiano offrirà un’occasione di confronto sui temi legati alla tutela e alla conservazione, e di riflessione sull’impegno civile e sulla responsabilità etica dello storico dell’arte in situazioni di emergenza.

PROGRAMMA
Lunedì 15 settembre

15:00
Gerhard Wolf
Introduzione

15:10
Carmen Belmonte – Elisabetta Scirocco
L’Aquila. Dal progetto all’esperienza dello ‘Studienkurs’

15:30
Cristiana Pasqualetti
Fare storia dell’arte all’Aquila prima e dopo il sisma

16:00
Valentina Valerio
Istantaneità e lunga durata: danni sismici e ricostruzioni nell’Italia dei terremoti

16:30 Pausa

17:00
Tomaso Montanari
Com’era e dov’era: perché?

17:30
Marco Ciatti
L’OPD e i danni da castastrofi al patrimonio culturale: problemi, esperienze e risultati

18:15
Salvatore Settis
Conclusioni

For further information, see http://www.khi.fi.it/aktuelles/veranstaltungen/veranstaltungen/veranstaltung542/index.html