Tag Archives: urbanism

CFP: Conquest and Construction: Architecture and Landscapes in the Medieval Mediterranean, Architecture Space and Society Research Centre, Birkbeck (University of London), March 1, 2019

CFP deadline: Monday 3 December 2018

Much recent scholarship on the medieval Mediterranean focuses on shifting borders and cultural identities. Conquest is one of the causes of such shifts. This one-day symposium will examine how the consequences of conquests were manifested in conquered cities and landscapes, asking how conquerors responded to their new environments and how conquered communities were built and re-built.

Papers might touch on any of the following in relation to conquest, conquerors or conquered territories in the Mediterranean world, in the period 500 – 1500.

  • Architecture
  • Space, landscape, urbanism, topographies
  • Architectural sculpture and decoration
  • Sacred and liturgical spaces
  • Destruction of architecture and urbanism
  • Spoliation and re-use of building materials
  • Cross-cultural exchanges through buildings, cities and landscapes
  • Conquerors as builders and patrons of architecture
  • Castles and defensive architecture
  • Written descriptions of conquered landscapes

Papers are welcome on all areas of the Mediterranean world (including the Islamic, Byzantine and Latin areas, Jewish communities, the crusades and border zones).

Please send proposals for 20-minute papers to Clare Vernon (c.vernon@bbk.ac.uk), by Monday 3 December 2018, including a paper title, an abstract (max 300 words) and contact details.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Call for Papers Metropolenbilder. Inszenierungen von Metropolität in Spätmittelalter und Renaissance (1200-1600) 26-27/11/2018 Deadline 15/05/2018

Notre-Dame-Cathedral-Paris

Der Aufstieg von Paris zur größten europäischen Stadt, zum Sitz der französischen Monarchie und zur führenden Universität des Abendlandes spiegelt sich in der zunehmenden Intensität der Diskurse über die Bedeutung der Seine-Stadt wider. In der Blütezeit des 16. Jahrhunderts schreiben sich Topoi wie diejenigen vom unvergleichlichen Paris („Paris sans Pair“) oder von der Weltstadt Paris („Lutetia non urbs, sed orbis“) in zahllose historiographische Texte, Briefe, Tagebücher, Karten und Bilder ein. Der Prozess der Bedeutungszuschreibung oder ‚Metropolisierung‘ beginnt aber schon im 12. Jahrhundert, und damit vor dem enormen Urbanisierungsschub des Spätmittelalters. Das Pariser Selbstbewusstsein, einem besonderen Gemeinwesen anzugehören, ist also nicht bloße Folge des demographischen, wirtschaftlichen und politischen Erfolges der Stadt. Die Diskurse über die Bedeutung moderieren vielmehr die Identitätsbildung als Metropole, aus deren Größe, Macht und Geschichte sich aktuelle politische oder kulturelle Ansprüche ableiten lassen. Ein solcher Prozess findet statt in Fremdzuschreibungen wie in Selbststilisierungen, Vergleichen mit historischen oder aktuellen Metropolen (Athen, Rom) und in der Multimedialität der Inszenierung. Entsprechende Selbstäußerungen können in fundierenden Stadtgeschichten (Gründungsmythen) und im Städtelob (Laus urbium) genauso verortet werden wie in Rechtstexten und Ego-Dokumenten, Ikonographie, Architektur oder herrschaftlichem Handeln.

Continue reading

CFP: Defense(less) city – Revista de Historia da Arte next issue

Revista de Historia da ArteDeadline: Apr 30, 2017

DEFENSE(LESS) CITY will be the special subject of next issue of the Revista de História da Arte from IHA-FCSH-NOVA.

The city is, by definition, alterity, difference. It is the human accomplishment par excellence, standing out from nature, isolating itself from it. The presumption of defense is inherent to the very idea of the urban. The rite of the city’s birth implies first tracing its symbolic defense precincts, followed by the effective building of its walls. In the Middle Ages, the very definition of a city requires a wall. But it is in Early Modernity that speculation about the city’s defenses reaches its zenith. Defenses are theorized in treatises and tested in fortifications. Throughout the Early Modern period, war becomes an exercise of extreme defense, of siege resistance. Until the time comes for the absolute inoperability of any kind of city walls. The Contemporary city stands literally fuori mura. And yet, cosmopolitan urbanity, supposedly open, is also potentially closed.

Continue reading

Conference: Al-Murābiṭūn: Noveno centenario del esplendor de un Imperio, Granada, October 19-22, 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAConference: Al-Murābiṭūn: Noveno centenario del esplendor de un Imperio, Granada, October 19-22, 2016
Inscription deadline: October 17, 2016.

The Universidad Internacional de Andalucía and the Escuela de la Alhambra present “Al-Murābiṭūn: Noveno centenario del esplendor de un Imperio,” a colloquium/ course in honor of the memory of Prof. Henri Terrasse, to he held 19-22 October 2017 at the Palace of Carlos V in the Alhambra (Granada).

2016 is the 900th anniversary of the conquest of the Balearic islands by the Almoravids (1116), an event which corresponded to the greatest territorial expansion of their empire and started the moment of its maximum splendor. With the occupation of the Islands, the empire obtained a vast territory extending from Mauritania to Zaragoza, as since the end of the 11th century they had been gaining power over the taifas of Al-Andalus, becoming the most important empire of Western Islam during the first half of the 12th century. They were the first to unite the two sides of the Strait of Gibraltar under the same political and religious power. This fact enabled a lively social, commercial and cultural exchange between Al-Andalus and North Africa, centered around the great capitals of the Empire, especially the North African Marrakech, and the peninsular Granada.

Moreover, this year marks 45 years since the death of Professor Henri Terrasse, a great scholar of the art of Morocco and Al-Andalus. Among his works are several publications dedicated to the art and arquitecture of Al-Andalus, necessary starting points for anyone interested in pursuing research in these fields.
During this international seminar, several specialists of the Almoravides will commemorate the 900th centernary of the apogee of the greater Western Islamic empire, with a special attention to the legacy of Henri Terrasse.

PROGRAMME
1a JORNADA: miércoles 19 de octubre
10:00 a 10:15 – Presentación
10:15 a 11:15 – Conferencia inaugural.
“Henri Terrasse y su contribución historiográfi ca”
D. Rafael LÓPEZ GUZMÁN (Universidad de Granada). 11:15 a 11:30 – Pausa-café

Sesión de mañana:
MESA 1.- Origen, génesis y evolución del Imperio almorávide
11:30 a 12:30
“Camelleros saharianos: la caracterización de los almorávides en las fuentes”
D.a Helena DE FELIPE (Universidad de Alcalá).
12:30 a 13:30
“El primer urbanismo de Marrakech”
D. Abdellatif MAROU (Conservador de la Inspección de Monumentos y Sitios Históricos de Marrakech, Ministerio de Cultura del Reino de Marruecos).
13:30 a 14:30
“El nacimiento del Califato almohade y el  fin de los almorávides. Introducción de un nuevo arte” D.a Dolores VILLALBA SOLA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisboa).
14:30 a 17:00- Almuerzo

Sesión de tarde:
MESA 2.- El Imperio almorávide: organización económica, política y jurisdicción
17:00 a 18:00
“La evolución de la organización política y administrativa del emirato almorávide al imperio almohade”
D. Pascal BURESI (CNRS, Lyon).
18:00 a 18:30- Pausa-café
[MESA 1.- Origen, génesis y evolución del Imperio almorávide]
18:30 a 19:30
“Historia de los almorávides a través de las fuentes textuales”
D.a Ma Jesús VIGUERA MOLINS (Universidad Complutense de Madrid).
19:30 a 20:00- Debate sesión de tarde

2a JORNADA: jueves 20 de octubre
Sesión de mañana

MESA 2 (b).- El Imperio almorávide: organización económica, política y jurisdicción 10:00 a 11:00
“Cadíes y cadiazgo andalusí en época almorávide”
D. Rachid EL HOUR (Universidad de Salamanca).
11:00 a 12:00
“La economía de los almorávides saharianos en el Sur de al-Andalus según sus indicios” D. Eduardo ESCARTÍN GONZÁLEZ (Universidad de Sevilla).
12:00 a 12:30 – Pausa-café
MESA 3.- Trabajos arqueológicos, conservación y difusión de la cultura material almorávide
12:30 a 13:30
“El registro arqueológico almorávide en Šarq al-Andalus: arquitectura y producciones cerámicas”
D. Pedro JIMÉNEZ CASTILLO (Escuela de Estudios Árabes – CSIC, Granada) y Manuel PÉREZ ASENSIO (Arqueólogo).
13:30 a 14:00 Debate sesión de mañana 14:00 a 17:00 – Almuerzo

Sesión de tarde
17:00 a 17:30
“La colección almorávide del Museo de la Alhambra: inventario y catálogo”
D.a Paula SÁNCHEZ GÓMEZ (Arqueóloga – Arquemus Medievalia S. L.) y Eva MORENO LEÓN (Arqueóloga – Arquemus Medievalia S. L.).
17:30 a 18:30
Visita a la colección del Museo de la Alhambra
D.a Paula SÁNCHEZ GÓMEZ (Arqueóloga – Arquemus Medievalia S. L.) y Eva MORENO LEÓN (Arqueóloga – Arquemus Medievalia S. L.).
18:30 a 19:00- Pausa-café
19:00 a 20:00
“Otra forma de enseñar la Historia”
D. Juan CASTILLA BRAZALES (Escuela de Estudios Árabes – CSIC, Granada).

3a JORNADA: viernes 21 de octubre
Sesión de mañana

MESA 4.- El arte y la cultura en la época almorávide: arquitectura, artes suntuarias y pensamiento estético
10:00 a 11:00
“La estética andalusí en el siglo XII”
D. José Miguel PUERTA VÍLCHEZ (Universidad de Granada).
11:00 a 12:00
“¿Existe un arte almorávide? Contribuciones y nuevas perspectivas”
D.a María MARCOS COBALEDA (Instituto de Estudos Medievais – FCSH/UNL, Lisboa).
12:00 a 12:30 – Pausa-café
12:30 a 13:30
“El Panteón Real del monasterio cisterciense de las Huelgas de Burgos. Historiografía, arqueología artística y modelo de conservación”
D.a Concha HERRERO CARRETERO (Patrimonio Nacional).
13:30 a 14:00 Debate sesión de mañana
14:00 a 17:00 – Almuerzo

Sesión de tarde
MESA 5.- Las civilizaciones coetáneas a los almorávides
17:00 a 18:00
“Toledo en el siglo XII: de la casa al barrio”
D. Jean PASSINI (LaDéHiS – CRH – EHESS, Paris).
18:00 a 18:30 – Pausa-café
18:30 a 19:30
“Relaciones entre musulmanes, judíos y cristianos en el Mediterráneo del siglo XII”
D. Brian A. CATLOS (University of Colorado, Boulder (EEUU) / The Mediterranean Seminar). 19:30 a 20:00 Debate sesión de tarde y conclusiones  nales

4a JORNADA: sábado 22 de octubre (opcional)
10:00 a 14:00
Visita al Palacio de Dar al-Horra, las murallas de la Alhacaba y el Bañuelo (personal de Huerto Alegre).

Time and place
El Seminario se celebrará en el Conjunto Monumental de la Alhambra y Generalife, en el Palacio de Carlos V, Granada.
Las clases tendrán lugar los días 19 al 22 de octubre de 2016, en horario de mañana y tarde (excepto el sábado 22 que será sólo de mañana).

How to apply:
Número de plazas y condiciones de admisión
El número de plazas es limitado, por lo que las solicitudes se atenderán por riguroso orden de matriculación.
La Universidad comunicará expresamente la matriculación del solicitante.
El seminario va dirigido fundamentalmente a alumnado universitario de los grados de Filología Árabe y Hebrea, Historia del Arte e Historia; medievalistas, arabistas y otros investigadores; guías e intérpretes; profesores de Instituto.

El plazo de matrícula  finaliza el 17 de octubre de 2016.
El importe es de 8 € de apertura de expediente.
Número de horas: 25.
El pago de la apertura de expediente deberá efectuarse por transferencia bancaria libre de gastos o por ingreso a la cuenta de La Caixa, O cina Isla de la Cartuja (Sevilla) IBAN: ES78 21009166752200074348

Formalización de la matrícula
Deberá aportarse la siguiente documentación:
1- Solicitud en el impreso que facilita la Universidad Internacional de Andalucía.
2- Fotocopia del DNI.
3- Justificante de haber abonado los derechos correspondientes.

CFP: Society of Architectural Historians (Glasgow, June 2017)

Society of Architectural Historians
2017 Annual International Conference
June 7-11 | Glasgow, Scotland

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline: June 6, 2016

Conference Chair: Sandy Isenstadt, SAH 1st Vice President-elect, University of Delaware

The Society of Architectural Historians is now accepting abstracts for its 70th Annual International Conference in Glasgow, Scotland, June 7–11. Please submit an abstract no later than June 6, 2016, to one of the 32 thematic sessions, the Graduate Student Lightning Talks or the open sessions. The thematic sessions have been selected to cover topics across all time periods and architectural styles. SAH encourages submissions from architectural, landscape, and urban historians; museum curators; preservationists; independent scholars; architects; and members of SAH chapters and partner organizations.

Thematic sessions and Graduate Student Lightning Talks are listed below. Please note that those submitting papers for the Graduate Student Lightning Talks must be graduate students at the time the talk is being delivered (June 7–11, 2017). Open sessions are available for those whose research does not match any of the themed sessions. Instructions and deadlines for submitting to themed sessions and open sessions are the same.

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Abstracts must be under 300 words.
  2. The title cannot exceed 65 characters, including spaces and punctuation.
  3. Abstracts and titles must follow the Chicago Manual of Style.
  4. Only one abstract per conference by author or co-author may be submitted.
  5. A maximum of two (2) authors per abstract will be accepted.

Abstracts are to be submitted online using the link below.

SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT

Abstracts should define the subject and summarize the argument to be presented in the proposed paper. The content of that paper should be the product of well-documented original research that is primarily analytical and interpretive, rather than descriptive in nature. Papers cannot have been previously published or presented in public except to a small, local audience (under 100 people). All abstracts will be held in confidence during the review and selection process, and only the session chair and general chair will have access to them.

All session chairs have the prerogative to recommend changes to the abstract in order to ensure it addresses the session theme, and to suggest editorial revisions to a paper in order to make it satisfy session guidelines. It is the responsibility of the session chairs to inform speakers of those guidelines, as well as of the general expectations for participation in the session and the annual conference. Session chairs reserve the right to withhold a paper from the program if the author has not complied with those guidelines.

Please Note: Each speaker is expected to fund his or her own travel and expenses to Glasgow, Scotland. SAH has a limited number of partial conference fellowships for which speakers may apply. However, SAH’s funding is not sufficient to support the expenses of all speakers. Each speaker and session chair must register and establish membership in SAH for the 2017 conference by August 31, 2016, and are required to pay the non-refundable conference registration fee to show their commitment.

KEY DATES

June 6, 2016 Deadline for submitting abstracts
July 15, 2016 Session chairs notify all persons submitting abstracts of the acceptance or rejection of their proposals
August 1, 2016 Annual conference fellowship applications open
August 31, 2016 Deadline for speaker and session chair registration (non-refundable) and membership in SAH
September 7, 2016 Deadline for conference fellowship applications
January 9, 2017 Speakers submit complete drafts of papers to session chairs
February 10, 2017 Session chairs return papers with comments to speakers
April 3, 2017 Speakers complete any revisions and distribute copies of their paper to the session chair and the other session speakers

Some sessions of possible interest to our readers:

Architectural Ghosts
This session explores the concept of the ghostly in architecture. While the “ghost” in architecture might refer to actual haunted places, it also refers to the unfinished, the remnant, the referenced, the remembered, and the ruined. How, when, and where do we find and interpret the ghostly in architecture? Whether it be the flicker of spatial remembrance like a passing sense of cold, the palimpsest of a former window on a solid brick wall, or a crumbling foundation overgrown in the woods—spirits, souls, traces, and the spaces in between abound in our experience of, and critical approaches to, architecture and its histories. The ghostly can complicate ideas about originality, temporality, authenticity, and the sacred. It may imply a process of design that could linger in uncanny twilight between the conscious and the unconscious. Moreover, might architectural ghostliness lure us towards nostalgia, utopia, and imagined histories? Architects haunted by various histories may be caught up in the ghostly too: the spectres of lost opportunities or ruined spaces, and, significantly, the persistent power of the past. The concept of the architectural phantom could equally imply spaces of the ephemeral—opening up possibilities of the architectural image in visual culture or performative practices. What can writers—from ancient dramas to gothic tales to modern critical theory—offer to the study of the ghostly in design? We are interested in papers that explore any aspect of the architectural ghost: the unfinished project, the troubled biography, the voices of the memorialized in monuments or crypts, the fragment and its imagined completion, or any case study or theoretical paradigm in which architectural apparitions, residues, shadows or wraiths might be found.

Session Chairs: Karen Koehler, Hampshire College, and Ayla Lepine, University of Essex

Medieval Vernacular Architecture
Scholarly interest in vernacular architecture has gained increased traction in the past few decades. As the editors of the 2005 volume Vernacular Architecture in the Twenty-First Century noted, vernacular architecture no longer is understood solely as domestic architecture, rural architecture, or architecture built by romanticized non-professionals—in other words a product counterpoint to “polite” building—but as a cultural process specific to a location, whether rural or urban, or to a people that reveals how builders within that group engage with ecological, technological, and cultural variables. In the same vein, in his 2010 book English Houses: 1300–1800, the archaeologist Matthew Johnson argued that vernacular architecture is an anthropological style, one in which a people, their histories, and priorities can be read through the building form.  Much work on vernacular architecture focuses on building from the twentieth century through the present..

This session seeks papers that address the study of buildings through the lens of the vernacular from the Middle Ages, defined roughly as the fifth through fifteenth centuries. Subjects are welcome from any part of the world and may include studies of domestic spaces, but in the aim of expanding the definition(s) of vernacular architecture, in particular so that its study can engage with other disciplines, the session encourages papers with anthropologic understandings of the vernacular that examine relationships, specific to an area or group, between builders, patrons, and their surrounding environments that contributed to cultural continuity. As such, this session is interested particularly in papers that address construction processes, lived experience, workshop practices, material and environmental analyses, and the impact of regional integration on local building within specific cultural, social, and historical environments, whether urban or rural, “polite” or domestic. In addition, papers that employ or discuss new technologies for analyzing medieval vernacular buildings are welcome.

Session Chair: Alexander Harper, Princeton University

Questions of Scale: Micro-architecture in the Global Middle Ages
This session seeks to expand worldwide a productive discourse that has engaged historians of Gothic architecture for at least forty years: the interplay of design ideas across the macro- and micro-architectural realms. In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries small-scale shrines and sacrament houses looked increasingly like monumental Gothic churches with pointed arches and flying buttresses. Soon, choir stalls and tabernacles became design laboratories that germinated formal ideas for full-sized structures arrayed with intricate niches or encrusted with delicate tracery. Moreover, recent scholarship by Sarah Guérin, Achim Timmermann, and Paul Binski has shown this interplay of forms provided more than formal ideas; smaller works of art, like ivory diptychs and pulpit canopies, could deploy the architectural features of churches and castles to project spiritual meanings.

This conversation should not be limited to medieval Europe. Micro-architecture featured in many design traditions and material cultures around the world during these years. At small scale, canopies with amalakas often sheltered sculptures of Hindu gods in the same manner as the gables and finials crowned statues of the Virgin and Child. Somewhat larger Chinese sutra cabinets for storing Buddhist scriptures were often built as octagonal pavilions, a form specified by the Song Dynasty text Yingzao fashi. They pre-date the Gothic sacrament houses mentioned above and parallel them in purpose and sophistication. At the monumental level, Goethe’s delight in the “great harmonious masses [of Strasbourg Cathedral], quickened into numberless parts” could equally apply to the temples of Khajuraho, where lofty sikharas rise as recursive compositions of miniaturized towers, or urushringas. In Islamic architecture muqarnas serve an opposite function; the tiny half-dome ornaments dematerialize their larger vaults. This session invites papers that address one or more case studies of micro-architecture from 300–1600 CE at any scale, from anywhere in the world, and in any media.

Session Chair: Jeffrey A. K. Miller, University of Cambridge

Rethinking Medieval Rome: Architecture and Urbanism

This session seeks to assess the impact of recent methodological developments on the study of the architecture and urban forms of the city of Rome from the end of the Gothic War (ca. 554) to the re-establishment of the papacy under Pope Martin V (ca. 1420). In the past decade the medieval humanities have opened up new perspectives on the past by focusing on questions of materiality, agency, temporality, spatiality, cross-cultural interaction, and ecocriticism. These new approaches, many of which are informed by interdisciplinary research and contemporary cultural interests in the natural and built world, are fundamentally reshaping how we conceive of and study medieval architecture and urbanism. This panel will examine how new methodologies and theoretically informed approaches are changing our understanding of the architecture of medieval Rome. The city of Rome has long occupied a particular place in scholarly narratives as the seat of the papacy, as a destination for pilgrims, and as a mythical symbol of past grandeur and decline. Historians of Rome’s medieval architecture and urban fabric have traditionally focused on such issues as the distinctively retrospective character of the city’s basilicas, the relationship between architecture and liturgy, the reuse of ancient materials, the topographical distinctions between the city’s inhabited and uninhabited regions, or the polemical character of Rome’s baronial tower houses. This session inquires into the current status of medieval Rome, both within the field of architectural history and in relation to the broader discourses of the medieval humanities. We invite contributions from architects, architectural historians, and scholars in allied fields whose work charts new avenues for rethinking the history of medieval Rome’s built environment through novel questions, through innovative methodological and technological approaches, by presenting new evidence, or by means of critical revisions of existing scholarly narratives.

Session Chairs: Marius B. Hauknes, Johns Hopkins University, and Alison Locke Perchuk, California State University Channel Islands

Call for Papers: Mapping urban changes (Dubrovnik, 20-22 Sep 2017)

dubrovnik-conrad-von-grunenberg1468Dubrovnik, Croatia, September 20 – 22, 2017
Deadline: Sep 5, 2016

The aim of this scientific workshop is to compare and discuss
methodologies of visualisation of the results achieved within the urban
history research. The intention is to gather researchers from different disciplines, like art and architectural history, urban development studies, geographical history, economic, social and political history
and archaeology, who would present their work. We are looking for papers dealing with the physical changes of urban tissue, its buildings or open spaces as well as those investigating the changes of the ways they were used, perceived or governed. The research could be based on
archival data, literary sources, old maps and city views or examination of the physical realm. The visualisations of these results realised through analytic maps, especially those made with the use of GIS programs or improved with 3D models are most welcomed, as well as any other methodology applied. The discussion will be focused on possibilities, obstacles, limits and achievements of these methodologies in the improvement of understanding and dissemination of the research results.

The scientific workshop is organized within the project Dubrovnik: Civitas et Acta Consiliorum. Visualizing Development of the Late Medieval Urban Fabric founded by Croatian Science Foundation; see more at ducac.ipu.hr . The papers will be published as e-book at the project web pages by the beginning of the workshop.

Keywords: mapping, visualisation, urban history
Period: Medieval, Early Modern, Modern

Organizers: Ana Plosnić Škarić and Danko Zelić, ducac project, Croatian
Science Foundation
Scientific Committee: Donatella Calabi, Alessandra Ferrighi, Nada
Grujić, Ana Marinković, Ana Plosnić Škarić, Danko Zelić

Location: Croatia, Dubrovnik, CAAS
Working Language: English

Abstracts Due to: 5 September 2016: in English, up to 300 words with
title; with name, affiliation, address and a CV up to 150 words
Notification of paper acceptance: 25 September 2016

Full Texts Paper Submissions Due to: 31 March 2017: c. 5000 words, in
English, Italian, French, German or Croatian

Call for Applications: Cathedral Cities. Planning and Building a Medieval Utopia – II TEMPLA Summer School

catedralvistaaereaCall for Applications: Cathedral Cities. Planning and Building a Medieval Utopia –
II TEMPLA Summer School,
“Nicolau d’Olwer i Pere i Joan Coromines” room,
Institut d’Estudis Catalans, Carrer del Carme 47,  08001 Barcelona, July 14th-16th 2016
Deadline: May 29, 2016

TEMPLA, a permanent workshop of Medieval Studies composed of specialists from universities, museums and archives from different parts of Spain, Europe and in particular Catalonia, seeks applications for its second Summer School, Cathedral Cities. Planning and Building a Medieval Utopia. National and international researchers into medieval art history and related disciplines are invited to to debate the concept and expression of “Cathedral Cities”, which have boosted in European episcopal sees during the medieval period. The studies of Cathedral City Landscapes could reveal the historical and living memory they  contain.
This call aims to understand how the fragile historical centers of cathedral cities have become the bearers of European’s identity, memory and their complex and plural intangible heritage. The medieval cathedral is widely seen as one of the most important contributions to European and global cultural history. Besides they often are the largest and oldest of all monuments in a city or town, cathedrals and their functioning influenced the way the city evolved. They are therefore essential to our understanding of local and regional history. Alongside their urban influence cathedrals are places for people – social congregation for secular and religious occurrence, where the memories of people and events were made and are now stored, where history and “invented traditions” intertwine.
The progress about knowledge of this European heritage is a necessary measure to protect its visibility and understanding as well as to justify the survival and sustainability of their uses. This living heritage, condenser and referential framework of social and cultural pan-European principles, is at risk of depletion and irrelevance. Therefore the results of the II TSS will be transferred to the academic community, but also to policy makers and citizens in general.

The School’s aims are:

1. To analyse the confluence of diverse resources and actors (institutional, economic, topographic, architectural…) activated to planning and building the place of cathedrals inside medieval cities and development of medieval cities around their cathedrals.
2. To propose new forms of contextualising historical building of European bishoprics in order to explain the results of artistic promotion underlining extra-artistic factors: e.g. liturgical, devotional, circulatory, … as well as convergence of actions by ecclesiastical and civil policies. For proper understanding of this issue it is necessary to emphasize the corresponding “framework for action”.
3- To evidence that the urban and architectural heritage of medieval cathedral cities is bearer of axiological meaning and transmitter of European identity, the validity of the collective memory and also builder of real and imaginary urban landscape.
4- To establish, on the basis of the results of the two previous objectives, new approaches and multidisciplinary research in the urban and social environments of European Cathedral Cities.

Organised by: Gerardo Boto, Marta Serrano, Vincent Debiais; TEMPLA. Institut de Recerca Històrica, Universidad de Girona.

How to Apply:  This scientific meeting is intended for a small number of participants; the application procedure allows for 10 researchers to be invited to present their research. Participants will be expected to take an active role in the debates that will follow each presentation. Every researcher must benefit from the contributions of the other specialists. The presentations and debates may take place in Spanish, French, Italian or English.
Format: The debates will take place on the first two days. On the third day there will be a visit to a Catalan Cathedral City to highlight in situ its particular specificities regarding episcopal and civil urbanism.
The workshop is principally aimed at young pre- and postdoctoral researchers in the areas of history of art, history and liturgical studies. Those who are interested in participating in the TEMPLA Summer School 2016 must submit:
• A letter of motivation that includes a description their current research,
• A CV (maximum one page)
• A presentation proposal (maximum 300 words).
These documents may be in Spanish, French, Italian or English.

The deadline for submitting this documentation is May 29 2016. It must be sent to (both): gerardo.boto@udg.edu and marta.serrano@urv.cat
Applicants will receive a response before June 13 2016. The successful candidates must provide the organizers with a description of the ideas they wish to present, any images relating to their presentation and a brief bibliography by June 26 2016. This documentation will be used to create a dossier a hand-out for the other attendees. The aim of this initiative is to encourage participants to submit proposals of direct interest to the planned debates.

Expenses for accomodation, lunch and other activities will be covered by the organisers. Participants must pay their travel expenses to the workshop.