Tag Archives: landscape

CFP: Conquest and Construction: Architecture and Landscapes in the Medieval Mediterranean, Architecture Space and Society Research Centre, Birkbeck (University of London), March 1, 2019

CFP deadline: Monday 3 December 2018

Much recent scholarship on the medieval Mediterranean focuses on shifting borders and cultural identities. Conquest is one of the causes of such shifts. This one-day symposium will examine how the consequences of conquests were manifested in conquered cities and landscapes, asking how conquerors responded to their new environments and how conquered communities were built and re-built.

Papers might touch on any of the following in relation to conquest, conquerors or conquered territories in the Mediterranean world, in the period 500 – 1500.

  • Architecture
  • Space, landscape, urbanism, topographies
  • Architectural sculpture and decoration
  • Sacred and liturgical spaces
  • Destruction of architecture and urbanism
  • Spoliation and re-use of building materials
  • Cross-cultural exchanges through buildings, cities and landscapes
  • Conquerors as builders and patrons of architecture
  • Castles and defensive architecture
  • Written descriptions of conquered landscapes

Papers are welcome on all areas of the Mediterranean world (including the Islamic, Byzantine and Latin areas, Jewish communities, the crusades and border zones).

Please send proposals for 20-minute papers to Clare Vernon (c.vernon@bbk.ac.uk), by Monday 3 December 2018, including a paper title, an abstract (max 300 words) and contact details.

 

 

 

 

Fellowships at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies

220px-villa_i_tatti2c_ext-2c_giardino_05Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy is now accepting fellowship applications for the 2018–2019 academic year.
Deadline: November 15

Wallace Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore the historiography and impact of the Italian Renaissance in the Modern Era (19th–21st centuries).

Berenson Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore “Italy in the World”. Projects should address the transnational dialogues between Italy and other cultures (e.g. Latin American, Mediterranean, African, Asian, etc.) during the Renaissance, broadly understood historically to include the period from the 14th to the 17th century.

Digital Humanities Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for projects that cut across traditional disciplinary boundaries and actively employ digital technology. Applicants can be scholars in the humanities or social sciences, librarians, archivists, and data science professionals. Projects should apply digital technologies such as mapping, textual analysis, visualization, or the semantic web to topics on any aspect of the Italian Renaissance.

Villa I Tatti – Boğaziçi University Joint Fellowship (one year; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral research focusing on the interaction between Italy and the Byzantine Empire (ca. 1300 to ca. 1700). Scholars will spend a semester at Villa I Tatti and a semester at the Byzantine Studies Research Center of Boğaziçi University.

Craig Hugh Smyth Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for curators and conservators. Projects can address any aspect of the Italian Renaissance art or architecture, including landscape architecture.

David and Julie Tobey Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for research on drawings, prints, and illustrated manuscripts from the Italian Renaissance, and especially the role that these works played in the creative process, the history of taste and collecting, and questions of connoisseurship.

For more information on all fellowships at Villa I Tatti please visit http://itatti.harvard.edu/fellowships

Call for applicants for Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship Scheme

The ASSC welcomes contact from early career academics interested in applying for a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship to be held at Birkbeck.

These prestigious awards are intended to provide the holders with an opportunity to undertake a significant project of original research and to progress their academic career. The fellowships are for three years and are based upon a matched funding agreement between the Trust and the host institution.

We are interested in hearing from potential candidates working in the areas of architectural history, architectural humanities, architecture and philosophy, history of landscape, history of interiors, spatial dimensions of archaeology, etc.  Candidates must meet the eligibility criteria for the fellowships (PhD thesis submitted between 2 March 2013 and 2 March 2017; PhD from a UK institution, or current post held at UK institution; have not held a permanent post).

Please look in the first instance at our list of members to identify an appropriate mentor, and make contact directly with him/her, ideally no later than 2nd December 2016. Candidates should work with their mentor to prepare the short pro-forma application and this should be returned to researchgrants@bbk.ac.uk by 13th January 2017.

There will be an internal college selection procedure to choose candidates to put forward for the fellowships. Applications will be considered at the meeting of the Birkbeck Research Strategy Group on 2nd February 2017 and potential candidates will be informed of the outcome on 3rd February 2016. The final Leverhulme deadline is 2nd March 2017.

Full details of this process can be accessed at http://www.bbk.ac.uk/staff-information/research/early-career-researchers (please note the application  proforma can be accessed via the link in the 5th bullet point under how to apply).

The Architecture Space and Society Centre provides a focus for the research activities taking place within Birkbeck and beyond in the area of architectural, design, and landscape history, contemporary architectural humanities and archaeology. The ASSC regularly hosts international speakers, thematic symposia, site visits, visiting scholars, and reading groups.

CFP: Monastic Europe, Landscape and Settlement (Ennis, 22-25 August 2015)

Call for Papers:
Monastic Europe: Landscape and Settlement. International Conference
Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland, 22-25 August 2015 
Deadline: 28 November 2014

The Irish Research Council-funded Monastic Ireland: Landscape and Settlement project is a research partnership between the Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Trinity College Dublin, the Discovery Programme and the Department of History, University College Cork. The project is examining the unusually well preserved remains of late medieval monastic buildings in Ireland within their broader European context, with a particular emphasis on their architecture and impact on the landscape around them.
Kilconnell

The project team is pleased to announce an international conference, to be held 22-25 August in Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland. Located in an area rich with the medieval buildings of the European monastic orders, the conference will balance sessions of papers with a number of site visits, and will stimulate a focused academic debate on the impact of monasticism in shaping the development of the physical environment across Europe between c. 1100 and c. 1700. Conference themes will include:

– The topography of medieval monastic settlement (1100-1700) in both urban and rural environments
– The impact of Church reforms on the physical structures and landscapes of monastic foundations
– Monastic space (liturgical, social, and architectural aspects)
– Patronage networks
– Architecture and identities
– Written sources for understanding the monastic environment

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers exploring this theme across the stated time span, throughout Europe. Papers may deal with either case studies or broader methodological questions, and are not limited to delivery in the English language.

Proposals for posters are also welcomed from doctoral students and early career scholars, and the conference organisers hope to have small subsidies available for accommodation costs>

Please send an email containing both your proposed title and an abstract of no more than 300 words to Dr Rachel Moss at rmoss@tcd.ie. If you intend for apply for a conference subsidy please indicate this on your proposal. Deadline for proposals is Friday, 28 November, 2104.

Lecture: Deserts, Rivers and Mountains: Nature and Divinity in Byzantine Pilgrimage Art, Brookline, MA

mjc-logo-lrgDr. Anastasia Drandaki (Benaki Museum) considers the role of natural landscape in Byzantine pilgrimage art. A pilgrimage was born of the believer’s longing to be in a locus sanctus (holy place), to see and touch and imitate holy persons, treading in their very footsteps.  Pilgrims themselves express this in their journals, describing step by step with emotion how they followed the episodes in scripture or accounts of the lives. They need to be sure that they are in exactly the right place, on the particular spot where the sacred events took place. It is as if eradicating the geographical distance might also circumvent the distance in time, bringing them as close as possible to the presence of the holy persons and their acts. Moreover, the natural formation of the holy place often plays a decisive role in texts related to shrines, and the pilgrims’ contact with the particular landscape of any given pilgrimage affects their religious experience. But is the relation between landscape and holy place reflected in any way in Byzantine pilgrimage art? Does the natural landscape of the loca sancta project in art and artefacts related to holy sites, offering  a potential exception to the familiar and much debated sketchy presence of physical space in Byzantine religious scenes? This lecture will explore how the natural, physical environment of the locus sanctus is depicted and participate in the art and artefacts that completed the pilgrimage experience.