Tag Archives: Workshops

Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London, 31 Jan-27 Jun 18)

Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB, January 31 – June 27, 2018

Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern

e986ba7faa2ca55eff27486400168447--leather-apron-workshop-designWorkshop and workshop practices represent a core and dynamic research strand in the history of art. This strand encompasses the study of canonical artists but equally of the anonymous producers whose activities can be deduced from the surviving art objects, thanks to ever developing research questions and methodologies. This topic helps us to think about the agents and their networks (artists, patrons and other market consumers), objects and socio-economic factors (making, buying and trading) as well as the broader cultural issues of the transmission of skills and ideas (the movement of artists, objects and imagery). Our lecture series brings together leading experts in medieval and early modern historical periods in and beyond Europe, particular highpoints for the study of workshop practices, and also those researching workshop continuities and changes in later centuries, including digital mediation.

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Call for Contributions: English Alabaster Sculptures in Context: Art, History and Historiography (edited volume)

english_-_resurrection_-_walters_27308The book aims at challenging the current limits within the field of research related to English alabasters, in order to establish a new model of study. Over the last century many studies on English alabasters have been published, including exhibition catalogues, list of documents and archival sources, catalogues raisonnés of the most important collections. All these studies have marked key points in the scholarly approach to English alabaster carvings, but they have also imposed a stubbornly curt historiographical perspective. Indeed, these publications have mainly been focused on specific collections -e.g. Frances Cheetham’s Medieval English alabaster carvings in the Castle Museum of Nottingham (Nottingham, 1973)-, and have thus provided only a partial view on that artistic phenomenon. They ended up isolating English alabasters from their historical and cultural context. In addition, as Susan Ward has pointed out in her review to Frances Cheetham’s Alabaster Images of Medieval England (Speculum, 2006), these publications’ main focus was often traditional: their bulks describe the standard subject matters found in the alabasters (e.g. the Passion of Christ, the Life of the Virgin and the saints) and explain the literary sources of that subject matter in a sometime too basic way. The authors tend to isolate the pieces from their wider historical framework, lacking to consider the character of piety in late-medieval England, and failing to consider the sculptures from a comprehensive historiographical point of view.

The book aims at setting the study of English alabasters on a new footing, which results from the influence of previous scholarship but, at the same time, reacts against it and is finally capable to establish a different approach.

Possible themes and subjects could address, but are not limited to one of the following topics

  • Alabaster altarpieces: function and design
  • Alabasters in pre/post Reformation England
  • Centres of productions, Trade routes
  • Workshop practices (Collaborations and Co-creations; Process and Method; Marks and Inscriptions; Archival records)
  • Reception of alabasters abroad; Possible adaption to local practices/taste
  • Patronage
  • Paraliturgical Dramas
  • Distinctions between rural/urban churches
  • Alabaster tombs

Papers will be collected in a volume to be published by the end of next year (2018), entitled English Alabaster Sculptures in Context: Art, History and Historiography. Submission: Please send an abstract of your proposed contribution (ca. 300 words) and a short CV to the editor: zuleika.murat@unipd.it.

Deadline: April 1, 2017.

Call for Papers: Mapping urban changes (Dubrovnik, 20-22 Sep 2017)

dubrovnik-conrad-von-grunenberg1468Dubrovnik, Croatia, September 20 – 22, 2017
Deadline: Sep 5, 2016

The aim of this scientific workshop is to compare and discuss
methodologies of visualisation of the results achieved within the urban
history research. The intention is to gather researchers from different disciplines, like art and architectural history, urban development studies, geographical history, economic, social and political history
and archaeology, who would present their work. We are looking for papers dealing with the physical changes of urban tissue, its buildings or open spaces as well as those investigating the changes of the ways they were used, perceived or governed. The research could be based on
archival data, literary sources, old maps and city views or examination of the physical realm. The visualisations of these results realised through analytic maps, especially those made with the use of GIS programs or improved with 3D models are most welcomed, as well as any other methodology applied. The discussion will be focused on possibilities, obstacles, limits and achievements of these methodologies in the improvement of understanding and dissemination of the research results.

The scientific workshop is organized within the project Dubrovnik: Civitas et Acta Consiliorum. Visualizing Development of the Late Medieval Urban Fabric founded by Croatian Science Foundation; see more at ducac.ipu.hr . The papers will be published as e-book at the project web pages by the beginning of the workshop.

Keywords: mapping, visualisation, urban history
Period: Medieval, Early Modern, Modern

Organizers: Ana Plosnić Škarić and Danko Zelić, ducac project, Croatian
Science Foundation
Scientific Committee: Donatella Calabi, Alessandra Ferrighi, Nada
Grujić, Ana Marinković, Ana Plosnić Škarić, Danko Zelić

Location: Croatia, Dubrovnik, CAAS
Working Language: English

Abstracts Due to: 5 September 2016: in English, up to 300 words with
title; with name, affiliation, address and a CV up to 150 words
Notification of paper acceptance: 25 September 2016

Full Texts Paper Submissions Due to: 31 March 2017: c. 5000 words, in
English, Italian, French, German or Croatian