Tag Archives: middle east

CFP: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan

bean20ms120-20folio2080l20-20liturgy20of20the20deadCall for Papers: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: 15 September 2017
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium at the University of Virginia invites graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars to submit papers for a session entitled “Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance” at the 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Abstracts of up to 250 words for a 15-20-minute paper should be submitted on or before September 15, 2017 via Google Forms (visit http://bit.ly/liturgyform). All entries will undergo blinded peer review. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decisions via email by Friday, September 22.

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

This panel turns on a rather simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? The howls of dissent rise up – Who would ask such a thing? The answer is both, of course! In response, this panel invites graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars to respond to the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide the future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Among other concerns, how are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? In what ways do liturgical texts both organize and find their roots in ritual reenactments that involve procession, genuflection, and acts of proskynesis? What episodes and anecdotes from the Middle Ages reveal how liturgical text is entangled with the environment in which it is read, sung, translated, or performed?

The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions. Since unpacking the meaning of a somatic study of liturgy is the prime goal of the session, participants may use movement, travel, and the kineticism of objects as organizing principles for their work or ask how scholars actually perform or participate in the liturgies they study. Interesting avenues include discussions of the materiality of liturgy, from enduring forms to ephemera, via a close look at manuscripts, printed books, sacred instruments, vestments, relics, urban layouts, decorations for processions, and the architecture of churches, chapels, and tombs. We particularly invite work that pushes the boundary of what is currently considered the purview of “liturgy and ritual studies,” explores some aspect of space and sound, and pertains to the smell, touch, and taste of the liturgy in North Africa, Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Russia, and the Byzantine world.

Session co-chairs:
Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu) and DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)

Call for Sessions: ‘360° – Places, Boundaries, Global Perspectives,’ IV Forum Medieval Art

GERMANY-COURT-US-NAZI-ART-JEWSCall for Sessions: ‘360° – Places, Boundaries, Global Perspectives,’ IV Forum Medieval Art, Berlin and Brandenburg, September 20 – 23, 2017
Deadline: June 1, 2016.
The 4th Forum Medieval Art will focus on research at the geographical
and methodological boundaries of classical medieval studies. The
various venues in Berlin and Brandenburg are the starting point, where,
on the one hand, local medieval topics will be discussed, and on the
other hand, the rich collections of Byzantine and Middle Eastern art
are available. Accordingly, the conference will highlight the
interaction of Central European medieval art and artistic production
with other regions ranging from Eastern Europe, Byzantium, the Middle
East, the Caucasus and the Mediterranean to the British Isles and the
Baltic region. Thus research areas such as Byzantine Studies or Islamic
Art History will be brought into the focus and consciousness of
medieval studies, particularly in the context of the severely
threatened artistic and architectural monuments of the Middle East.
Especially welcome are topics discussing phenomena such as migration,
media transformation and cultural paradigms. By asking for culturally
formative regions at the borders of “Europe” and transcultural contact
zones, definitions of the Middle Ages can be put up for debate. As a
counterpart to this panorama, research about the region of Brandenburg
and Berlin will also be presented. This includes subjects of museum
studies and the history art of and in Berlin, where the development of
areas of cultural exchange has a long tradition.

Organisation: Christian Freigang and Antje Fehrmann (Freie Universität
Berlin), Kai Kappel and Tina Zürn (Humboldt-Universität Berlin) with
further partners in Berlin and Brandenburg

Submission: Please send your submission until June 1, 2016, to
mail@mittelalterkongress.de

More information: www.mittelalterkongress.de

CFP: Mutual Imaginings of Europe and the Middle East 800-1700 (3rd December 2016)

Beyond Borders:
Mutual Imaginings of Europe and the Middle East (800-1700)
Barnard College’s 25th Biannual Medieval and Renaissance Studies Conference
Saturday, December 3, 2016
Call for Papers
Recent scholarship is challenging the stark border between Europe and the Middle East during the long period between 800-1700.  Rather than thinking of these areas in isolation, scholars are revealing the depth of their mutual influence. Trade, war, migration, and scholarly exchange connected Europe and the Middle East in ways both cooperative and adversarial. The distant world was not only an object of aggression, but also, inextricably, of fantasy and longing. Jewish, Muslim, and Christian thinkers looked to each other to understand their own cultural histories and to imagine their futures.  Bringing together art historians, literary scholars, historians, scholars of the history of science, and scholars of religious thought, this interdisciplinary conference will explore the real and imaginary cultural interchanges between Europe and the Middle East during their formative periods. The conference will feature plenary lectures by Professors Nancy Bisaha of Vassar College, and Nabil Matar of the University of Minnesota.
This conference is being organized by Professors Rachel Eisendrath, Najam Haider, and Laurie Postlewate of Barnard College.
Please send an abstract (with title) of approximately 200 words and CV to lpostlew@barnard.edu<mailto:lpostlew@barnard.edu>. Presentations should be 20 minutes. Deadline: April 10, 2016.

Phd Fellowships & Postdocs in Medieval Literature (Southern Denmark; 2014-15)

The Centre for Medieval Literature (CML) at the Department of History invites applications for two PhD-fellowships of 3 years in Medieval literature. The positions are available starting Sept 1, 2014 or as soon as possible thereafter.

How to apply: http://www.sdu.dk/en/servicenavigation/right/ledige_stillinger/jobs/Soegjob

There are two further studentships based in York; they are announced at the University of York website (http://www.york.ac.uk/). It is possible to apply both at York and Odense with the same research plan, but you will need to follow the procedures of application for each University.

Jointly based at the University of Southern Denmark (Odense) and the University of York (UK), CML is a centre of excellence funded by the Danish National Research Foundation for six to ten years.

The CML takes an integrated European approach to the study of Medieval Literature with research ranging from Scandinavia to the Middle East.  Our research is organized into three main areas: languages, fictionality, and canon formation.  The work of CML is interdisciplinary (crossing literature and history) in studying texts as embedded within social relationships. We also attend to the modern representation of and interaction with medieval literature. You can find more about our research and activities on the CML website: www.sdu.dk/cml.

Successful candidates for the PhD fellowships will be committed to
1) collaboration which unites scholarship across disciplines and languages,
2) creating a shared research environment across SDU and York,
3) situating their research within a wider European framework. In addition to describing your research topic and how it will fit into one or more of the three strands of CML, your proposal should include a statement of what you think you could contribute to the teamwork that is an important aspect of the CML.

The application should include:
• Special PhD-application form found here
• Curriculum Vitae
• Detailed project description, no more than 5 pages
• Examination certificates 
• Relevant publications.
A pdf file is attached for each publication. Any declaration of co-authorship should be part of this pdf file 

Further information about the PhD-program at the Faculty of Humanities can be found here.
The university welcomes applications from all interested parties regardless of age, gender, religion or ethnic background.

The application deadline is March 1st 2014 at 23:59 CE Apply Online

The Centre for Medieval Literature (CML) at SDU invites applications for two positions as a 3-year Postdoc in Medieval literature, one at the Department of History and one at the Department for the Study of Culture. The positions are available starting September 1, 2014 or as soon as possible thereafter.

10 Postdoctoral Fellowships: Europe in the Middle East, The Middle East in Europe

10 Postdoctoral Fellowships: Europe in the Middle East, The Middle East in Europe
Berlin
Deadline: 15 January 2014

Bassin_Syrie_1The Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien invites scholars to apply for up to ten postdoctoral fellowships for the research program EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE EAST – THE MIDDLE EAST IN EUROPE (EUME).

EUME seeks to rethink key concepts and premises that link and divide Europe and the Middle East. The program draws on the international expertise of scholars in and outside of Germany and is embedded in university and extra-university research institutions in Berlin. It supports historical-critical philology, rigorous engagement with the literatures of the Middle East and their histories, the social history of cities and the study of Middle Eastern political and philosophical thought (Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and secular) as central fields of research not only for area or cultural studies, but also for European intellectual history and other academic disciplines. The program explores modernity as a historical space and conceptual frame.

The program puts emphasis on three programmatic ideas:
1) supporting research that demonstrates the rich and complex historical legacies and entanglements between Europe and the Middle East
2) reexamining genealogical notions of mythical ‘beginnings’, ‘origins’, and ‘purity’ in relation to culture and society
3) rethinking key concepts of a shared modernity in light of contemporary cultural, social, and political entanglements that supersede identity discourses as well as national, cultural or regional canons and epistemologies that were established in the nineteenth century.

The fellowships are intended primarily for scholars of art history, history, literature, philology, political philosophy, political science, religion and sociology who want to carry out their research projects in connection with the Berlin program. Applicants should be at the postdoctoral level and should have obtained their doctorate within the last seven years. Fellows gain the opportunity to pursue research projects of their own choice within the framework of one of the above-mentioned research fields and in relation to the overall program ‘Europe in the Middle East – the Middle East in Europe’. Successful applicants will be fellows of EUME at the Forum Transregionale Studien and associate members of one of the university or non-university research institutes listed below.

As a rule, the fellowships start on 1 October 2014 and will end on 31 July 2015. Postdoctoral fellows will receive a monthly stipend of 2.500 € plus supplement depending on their personal situation. Organisational support regarding visa, insurances, housing, etc. will be provided. Fellows are obliged to work in Berlin and to help shape the seminars and working discussions related to their research field. The working language of EUME is English.

EUME supports and builds upon the following interconnected research fields:

CITIES COMPARED: URBAN CHANGE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AND ADJACENT REGIONS
This research group is directed by Ulrike Freitag and Nora Lafi, both of the Zentrum Moderner Orient, Berlin. It contributes to the debate on plurality, citizenship and civil society from the historical experience of conviviality and socio-cultural, ethnic, and religious differences in the cities around the Mediterranean;

ISLAMIC DISCOURSE CONTESTED: MIDDLE EASTERN AND EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVES
is directed by Gudrun Kraemer, Institute for Islamic Studies, Freie Universitaet Berlin. It analyzes modern Middle Eastern thought in the framework of discourses on modernity, secularity, and justice;

PERSPECTIVES ON THE QUR’AN: NEGOTIATING DIFFERENT VIEWS OF A SHARED HISTORY
is directed by Angelika Neuwirth, Seminar for Arabic Studies, Freie Universitaet Berlin, and Stefan Wild, Universitaet Bonn. This research group situates the foundational text of Islam within the religious and literary landscape of late antiquity, early Islamic History and Arabic philology, and combines a historicization of its genesis with an analysis of its hermeneutics, its reception and perception in Europe and the Middle East;

TRAVELLING TRADITIONS: COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES ON NEAR EASTERN LITERATURES
is directed by Friederike Pannewick, Centrum fuer Nah- und Mitteloststudien, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, and Samah Selim, Rutgers University. This research group reassesses literary entanglements and processes of canonization between Europe and the Middle East.

TRADITION AND THE CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY: SECULARISM, FUNDAMENTALISM AND RELIGION FROM MIDDLE EASTERN PERSPECTIVES
is a special forum, directed by Amnon Raz-Krakotzkin, Ben-Gurion University, that attempts to rethink key concepts of modernity like secularity, tradition, or religion in the context of the experiences, interpretations, and critiques of Jews, Arabs, and Muslims in the Middle East and in Europe.

A new field of research that attempts to bridge the gap between political science approaches and cultural studies will be developed during the coming year. It will be directed by Cilja Harders, Otto-Suhr-Institut fuer Politikwissenschaft, Freie Universitaet Berlin, and Rachid Ouaissa, Political Science Departement, Centrum für Nah- und Mittelost-Studien, Philipps-Universität Marburg.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE”

An application should be made in explicit relation to one of the research fields and consist of
– a curriculum vitae,
– a project description (no longer than 5 pages), stating what the scholar will work on in Berlin if granted a fellowship)
– a sample of scholarly work (maximum 20 pages from an article, conference paper, or dissertation chapter)
– a letter of recommendation by one university instructor (that can be sent by as a separate e-mail).

The application should be submitted by e-mail as four separate PDF files in English and should be received by 15 January 2014, sent in to: eume@trafo-berlin.de

For information on the research institutions in Berlin participating in EUME, please visit:
– Berlin Graduate School of Muslim Cultures and Societies, FU Berlin
– Center for Middle Eastern and North African Politics, FU Berlin
– Corpus Coranicum, Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities
– Zentrum Moderner Orient
– Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of Literary Studies, FU Berlin
– Institute for Islamic Studies, FU Berlin
– Museum for Islamic Art
– Seminar for Arabic Studies, FU Berlin