Tag Archives: Exhibitions

#MetGala In All Its Glory

We’ve now had a week to digest the photos, the fashion, and the inevitable memes of Met Gala 2018. Hopefully a week has been enough time to take in the weird, wonderful, and worshipful experience that was this year’s annual fundraiser for the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute. Each year the gala’s theme is based on the Institute’s summer exhibition, and on 10 May Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination opened at both the Met’s 5th Avenue and Cloisters locations. Kim Kardashian was compared to a Eucharist chalice, haloes abounded, and ‘Rihanna going full pope’ is now a phrase.

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10 Must-See Temporary Exhibitions this Summer

The end of term is in sight and the days are getting longer. And that means we’re all daydreaming of summer. Whether your summer plans call for research or relaxation, take advantage of some stellar temporary exhibitions happening around the globe that are highlighting the production, context, and craftsmanship of medieval art. These exhibitions are pushing boundaries, considering new contexts, and boasting bold feats—several of these exhibitions present artworks on view in North America and Europe for the first time. Let us know your favourites by sharing your thoughts in the comments below. Happy Summer!

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Les Enluminures: Salon International du Livre Rare & de l’Objet d’Art de Paris (Stand C5) April 7 to 9, 2017

Poster Salon International du livre rare & de l'objet d'art

International Showroom of Rare Books and Artistic Objects

Les Enluminures warmly invites you to visit us at the

SALON INTERNATIONAL DU LIVRE RARE & DE L’OBJET D’ART STAND C5

where we will be exhibiting an exceptional selection of illuminated manuscripts, Books of Hours, Text Manuscripts and miniatures.

 

Highlights of the exhibition

Address:

Grand Palais

Avenue Winston Churchill
75008 Paris

PREVIEW
Thursday, April 6, 5 pm – 10 pm

OPENING HOURS
April 7 to 9, 2017
Daily, 11 am – 8 pm
Sunday, 11 am – 7 pm

1, rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau
75001 Paris
tel +33 1 42 60 15 58
info@lesenluminures.com

New Exhibition and Events: Opus Anglicanum, Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery, V&A Museum, 1 October 2016 – 5 February 2017

opus anglicanum to deleteNew Exhibition: Opus Anglicanum: Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1 October 2016 – 5 February 2017

From the 12th to the 15th centuries, England enjoyed an international reputation for the quality of its luxury embroideries, and were frequently referred to as ‘Opus Anglicanum’ (English work). Often featuring complex imagery, and ambitious in their scale and intricacy, they were sought after by kings, queens, popes and cardinals across Europe. This exhibition is the first opportunity in over half a century to see an outstanding range of surviving examples in one place. Paintings, illuminated manuscripts, metalwork and stained glass will be shown alongside, to explore the world within which these exquisite works were created.

Luxury embroideries were made by professional craftsmen and women living in the City of London, some of whom we can still identify by name. London was a hub for commerce, and the embroiderers formed part of an international mercantile network. The rare survivals of this extraordinary period of English art are today scattered across Europe and North America. Some of the embroideries have not been seen in Britain since they were produced.

Book now: vam.ac.uk/opus


 

lossy-page1-1024px-web2c_grevens_sc3a4ngkammare-_detalj2c_grevens_sc3a4ng_-_skoklosters_slott_-_88043-tifEnglish Medieval Embroidery Unpicked, day course, The Lydia & Manfred Gorvy Lecture Theatre @V&A Museum, Saturday 12 November 2016

STUDY DAY: This study day explores the world of England’s Medieval luxury embroideries, known as Opus Anglicanum. We will examine their materials, techniques and design; the patrons and artists involved; and the extraordinary images depicted on them.

During the later Middle Ages, England enjoyed an international reputation for its luxury embroideries, produced for Europe’s greatest patrons including kings, queens, cardinals and popes. This study day will put embroideries in the exhibition Opus Anglicanum: Masters of Medieval Embroidery under the microscope, examining their materials, techniques and design; the patrons and artists involved; and exploring the extraordinary images depicted on them. Leading experts in the field will discuss these questions in what promises to be a fascinating afternoon.

With exhibition curators Glyn Davies and Sally Dormer.

14.00 – 16.30, Saturday 12 November 2016

£35 full, £30 concessions, £15 students


 20160719161621_170Opus Anglicanum: An Introduction to Silk & Gold Embroidery, Workshop, Art Studio @V&A Museum, Saturday 12 November, 10.30 – 16.30

WORKSHOP: Learn the secrets behind the beautiful embroidery techniques of Opus Anglicanum as seen in this exhibition. Sarah will guide you step by step through split stitch fillings, surface couching and underside couching with gold threads on an Opus Anglicanum inspired piece of your own, in this one day introduction to medieval embroidery. All materials included.

Saturday 12 November, 10.30 – 16.30

£92.00, £73.60 concessions

(Lead Image: The Steeple Aston Cope 1330-40 (detail). The Rector and Churchwardens of St Peter and St Paul, Steeple Aston, Oxfordshire. On long term loan to the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.)

New Exhibition: Visions of Jerusalem: Medieval Christendom Imagines the City on a Hill @Les Enluminures, New York, September 16-November 12, 2016

enluminures to delete.pngLes Enluminures is pleased to present Visions of Jerusalem: Medieval Christendom Imagines the City on a Hill. The exhibition explores the representation of the Holy City in the images and imaginations of the Latin West and the rich diversity of its representation in both word and picture. It is conceived to coincide with the major inter-
national exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jerusalem 1000-1400, Every People Under Heaven, which scrutinizes through a much broader lens the impact Jerusalem had on the many cultural traditions that hold it dear: Eastern, Western, African, Jewish, Muslim, Christian, each with multiple identities and denominations.

Far from inspiring a consistent Christian conception of the Holy City, we show how Jerusalem prompted a vast range of depictions by Western authors and artists. In a time before cameras, images of Jerusalem were less concerned with veracity than with the power of their associations. The versatility of the Holy Land allowed it to act not only as the mise en scène for the Church’s rich biblical-mystical tradition, but also as a virtual destination for spiritual pilgrims and a touchstone in medieval apocalyptic traditions, among others. These varying visions of Jerusalem exemplify the fascinating complexity of the city. In the medieval mind, Jerusalem was both heavenly and earthly. It was a physical location and a mental construction that offered a link to the past and a harbinger of the future.

Highlights of the exhibition include a miniature depicting the Agony in the Garden from the Holy Land Choir Book, the long lost first volume of the Bible of Louis de Harcourt, Patriarch of Jerusalem and Bishop of Bayeux, a beautifully illustrated early gothic copy of Peter of Poitiers’ geneological scroll, and a deluxe book of hours with miniatures attributed to the Workshop of the Master François.

Place:
LES ENLUMINURES
23 East 73rd Street, 7th Floor, Penthouse, New York, NY 10021

Dates:
September 16th through November 12th, 2016

Hours:
Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 6pm

Contact information:
Adrienne Albright / +1 212 717 7273 / newyork@lesenluminures.com

Call for papers: Exhibiting the Renaissance

indexExhibiting art objects has certainly increased over the past decades. There are more and more large scale exhibitions, some of which able to attract masses of people. What is the driving force behind this multitude of exhibitions? Does Renaissance, once a classical topic, still play a significant role? In order to understand the outreach of the Renaissance in public view, we would like to have insides on how museums are dealing with their Renaissance departments. A museum is seldom build of objects just of one single period, but collections and their curators are competing over permanent exhibition space and temporary exhibitions.

We would like to invite papers with reflections on the value of
Renaissance objects in the perception of museum strategies, competing
collections, possibilities of exhibition, etc. The value and perception
of the collection might vary because the museum strategy values the
Renaissance highly, because the curator is a successful promoter,
because the civic surroundings are especially open to Renaissance
topics, because the permanent collection already contains widely known
Renaissance objects, or because the exhibition projects focus on topics
which attract a mass of people.

A thematic issue on “Exhibiting the Renaissance” is projected with the
open access online journal Kunsttexte (www.kunsttexte.de) for the first
half of 2015. We invite papers (in German, English, French, Italian,
Spanish) for a deadline in October 2014. Please feel free to contact
the editors of the section Renaissance with any questions.

Send your proposals to both editors of Kunsttexte (Sektion Renaissance)
Angela Dressen (adressen@itatti.harvard.edu)
Susanne Gramatzki  (gramatz@uni-wuppertal.de)

Deadline: 31 October 2014

Mercers’ Hall Christ to star in new Tate Britain exhibition

A new exhibition at Tate Britain focusing on iconoclasm and vandalism in art will feature a statue of Christ found beneath the floor of the chapel of the Mercers’ Hall in London. Since its discovery in 1954, the statue has never been sent out on loan.

The Mercers' Hall Christ

The statue is likely by a Flemish artist working in England and may have been part of a tomb monument. It was rather specifically damaged by the removal of its limbs before being buried at the Reformation, and preserves much of the fine carving of the harrowed face and intricate Gothic draperies. For further reading see the article shortly after its discovery by Joan Evans and Norman Cook (available here) and Kim Woods “The Mercers’ Christ reexamined”, in Richard Marks (ed.), Late Gothic England: Art and Display, (2007), 57-69.

Art under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm opens at Tate Britain on 2 October. For more on the exhibition as whole, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-23198478