Tag Archives: architectural history

CFP: SAH Annual Conference, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, 24-28 April 2019

aaeaaqaaaaaaaaxzaaaajdk2yjhizwy3ltljzjytndvhoc05otjklwi2n2u5mtkwmtkwoqCall for Session Proposals: SAH Annual Conference, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, 24-28 April 2019

Deadline: Tuesday, January 16, 2018, at 5:00 pm CST

Conference Chair
: Victoria Young, University of St. Thomas
Local Co-Chairs: Dietrich Neumann, Brown University, and Itohan Osayimwese, Brown University

The Society of Architectural Historians will offer a total of 36 paper sessions at its 2019 Annual International Conference in Providence, Rhode Island. The Society invites its members, including graduate students and independent scholars, representatives of SAH chapters and partner organisations, to chair a session at the conference. As SAH membership is required to chair or present research at the annual conference, non-members who wish to chair a session will be required to join SAH next August 2018 when conference registration opens for Session Chairs and Speakers.

Since the principal purpose of the SAH annual conference is to inform attendees of the general state of research in architectural history and related disciplines, session proposals covering every time period and all aspects of the built environment, including landscape and urban history, are encouraged.

Sessions may be theoretical, methodological, thematic, interdisciplinary, pedagogical, revisionist or documentary in premise and ambition and have broadly conceived or more narrowly focused subjects. Sessions that embrace cross-cultural, transnational and/or non-Western topics are particularly welcome. In every case, the subject should be clearly defined in critical and historical terms.

Proposals will be selected on the basis of merit and the need to create a well-balanced program. Topics exploring the architecture of Providence and the greater region are encouraged.

Since late submissions cannot be considered, it is recommended that proposals be submitted well before the deadline. Last-minute submissions that fail posting in the online portal or are sent in error via email cannot be considered.

Click here for more information.

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Jobs

medieval-argumentation
Lebanese American University – Visiting faculty, Islamic Art &
Architecture
Occidental College – ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN THE HISTORY OF ART OF ASIA
University of California – Riverside – Assistant Professor in Art and
Material Culture of the Islamic World
Swarthmore College – Assistant Professor of Architectural History

Call for applicants for Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship Scheme

The ASSC welcomes contact from early career academics interested in applying for a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship to be held at Birkbeck.

These prestigious awards are intended to provide the holders with an opportunity to undertake a significant project of original research and to progress their academic career. The fellowships are for three years and are based upon a matched funding agreement between the Trust and the host institution.

We are interested in hearing from potential candidates working in the areas of architectural history, architectural humanities, architecture and philosophy, history of landscape, history of interiors, spatial dimensions of archaeology, etc.  Candidates must meet the eligibility criteria for the fellowships (PhD thesis submitted between 2 March 2013 and 2 March 2017; PhD from a UK institution, or current post held at UK institution; have not held a permanent post).

Please look in the first instance at our list of members to identify an appropriate mentor, and make contact directly with him/her, ideally no later than 2nd December 2016. Candidates should work with their mentor to prepare the short pro-forma application and this should be returned to researchgrants@bbk.ac.uk by 13th January 2017.

There will be an internal college selection procedure to choose candidates to put forward for the fellowships. Applications will be considered at the meeting of the Birkbeck Research Strategy Group on 2nd February 2017 and potential candidates will be informed of the outcome on 3rd February 2016. The final Leverhulme deadline is 2nd March 2017.

Full details of this process can be accessed at http://www.bbk.ac.uk/staff-information/research/early-career-researchers (please note the application  proforma can be accessed via the link in the 5th bullet point under how to apply).

The Architecture Space and Society Centre provides a focus for the research activities taking place within Birkbeck and beyond in the area of architectural, design, and landscape history, contemporary architectural humanities and archaeology. The ASSC regularly hosts international speakers, thematic symposia, site visits, visiting scholars, and reading groups.

Job: Assistant Professor, Architectural history/History of planning and urban design, Bryn Mawr College, USA

bmc_black_stacked2-thumbJob: Assistant Professor, Architectural history/History of planning and urban design, Bryn Mawr College, USA
Start date: August 1, 2017
Deadline: December 5, 2016

The Department of Growth and Structure of Cities at Bryn Mawr College invites applications for a full-time, beginning tenure-track Assistant Professor position in architectural history or the history of planning and urban design to start August 1, 2017. The candidate’s teaching and research interests should focus on the built environment and its relationship to social, economic, political, cultural and aesthetic factors across time and place.  The successful candidate will teach an introductory survey of urban form and develop appropriate intermediate and advanced courses in the field and a course in research methods. A Ph.D. in architectural or planning history or another relevant field is required by the start date.

How to apply: Submit as pdf documents a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teaching philosophy and research statement by December 5, 2016 to Growth and Structure of Cities Search Committee via Interfolio ByCommittee at: https://apply.interfolio.com/35957.

In addition, arrange for three letters of recommendation to be submitted via Interfolio to the Growth and Structure of Cities Search Committee.

Applications received by December 5, 2016 will receive full consideration.   http://www.brynmawr.edu/provost/open_positions.html#Tenure_track_positions

PhD Funding Opportunity: SAHGB Scholarship, 2016-2017

The SAHGB inviteslogo_400x400 applications for a PhD Scholarship for this coming academic year, 2016/17.
Deadline: September 19, 2016.

SAHGB Scholars receive £13,500 p.a. and free membership of the Society whilst in receipt of the award. The only restriction on applicants is that they must be studying full-time at a United Kingdom university, or intending to study full-time, but they can apply at any stage of their research when scholarships are advertised. Part-time students, or those considering part-time study, are acceptable on condition they register for full-time study upon receipt of the award.

The scholarship is tenable a maximum of three years, renewable subject to satisfactory academic performance and to the Society’s finances. Funding will be directed to students on the basis of recognised financial need as well as merit. Applicants should not be in receipt of any other award, but exceptional cases will be considered.

The full Terms & Conditions of the PhD Scholarships can be found here.
How to Apply:
Applicants must submit, along with an online form on our website, the following:
·      A copy of their current CV
·      An outline of their research (max 750 words)
·      A covering letter stating reasons for application
·      Two references in support of the application

Further information on how to submit this information can be found on the Society’s website,where previous scholarship holder’s research areas are also outlined.

Questions concerning the scholarship may be directed to the Society’s Education Officer.

Taking architectural history to the bridge: International Bridges Group inaugural meeting report

The study of architecture largely focuses on the study of buildings: constructions with their most essential function as shelter for the human body. But architectural history can forget that constructions with other functions are also ripe for interpretation of their structure and ideologies. This is what the ambitiously-named International Bridges Group intends to promote for crossings of all kinds, but beginning with a focus upon the medieval. Hence we at MedievalArtResearch.com were invited to their inaugural meeting at Westminster Hall on the banks of the Thames, followed by a day of in-depth (hopefully not literally) investigation of medieval bridges in the Nene and Great Ouse valleys. It as an opportunity to experience the fledgling sub-discipline of gephyrology: a neologism which currently only returns fifty results on Google.

Delegates assembled under the flying buttress of Westminster Hall

As the current writer specialises on ecclesiastical architecture, one thing that emerged in the day in Westminster Hall was how similar working on the English bridge is to studying English parish church. Opening lectures from John Blair and John Chandler established thinking about English bridges is closely linked to unravelling the origins and operation of the English parochial system. Many current bridges can be traced back to the increasing importance of kingdoms in the late eighth century, and the establishment of centres of power. Just like churches, sometimes the opportunity to build a bridge was seized upon by institutions, monastic, parochial or secular to make a powerful architectural statement. Equally, institutions could be less responsible: maintenance neglected and pontage tolls embezzled.

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David Harrison addresses delegates

Also like English churches, English bridges are uniquely weird and wonderful in equal measure. John P. Allan showed us, via the Exe bridge at Exeter, how independent masons may have been happy to meet in the middle with rounded and pointed arches; while Peter Cross Rudkin showed the English fondness for soffit ribs under the arches, akin to the complicated mouldings of English churches. The rib may have originally had a functional purpose centring the arch before it was built up: especially important for a rounded arch that cannot support itself. But since the ribs are often spaced wider than the length of the stones on top, it would appear that they have assumed the status of a skeuomorph: a decorative form derived from a practical necessity. Having a bridge that had distinctively bridge-like forms was clearly as essential as its structural practicality.

Jana Gajdošová and the tower of the Charles Bridge, Prague

Jana Gajdošová and the tower of the Charles Bridge, Prague

Just as a church spire provided an opportunity to dominate the sky, a bridge provided a powerful opportunity to assert ideology through these unique architectural semiotics. Susan Irvine used Anglo-Saxon literature to consider the bridge as a liminal space: a meeting point between two places. The potential of using this category of space was explored by Jana Gajdošová and Gerrit Jasper Schenk, both presenting papers on bridges rebuilt after disaster. The Gothic Charles Bridge in Prague, with its enormous bridge-tower and scheme of regal architectural sculpture, Jana showed to be a powerful expression of the megalomaniacal ambition of the Holy Roman Emperor. Gerrit compared the rebuilt Ponte Vecchio to the Florentine Bapistery: a pagan monument to Mars reclaimed for John the Baptist, expressed through inscriptions that speak of the enlightened commune of the city.

The final session brought us to how the established concept of a bridge worked in larger societal concepts: Jacopo Turchetto took us to medieval Anatolia, demonstrating how magnificent Ottoman bridges represented much older meeting places of travelling caravans. Roberta Magnusson and David Harrison both gave rich lectures about the bridge in the frameworks of English urban infrastructure and society that proved vital for enlightened conversation on the group’s trip out the Nene and Great Ouse Valleys the next day.

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Great Barford, Bedfordshire

Great Barford (Bedfordshire), c.1428

After an early Sunday-morning start, the first bridge the delegates encountered was Great Barford in Bedfordshire, dated by a major bequest of 1428. Much of the problem of looking at bridges is that, unlike a building, it faces not just the usual climatic elements, but also heavy traffic, perpetually flowing water, and wandering boats. Therefore it is inevitable that they fail and are rebuilt. Great Barford was also slightly spoiled by the 1874 widening – a common solution to the problem of increasing road traffic in the Modern age – here achieved by building out the bridge on the west side with a brick refacing.

Irthlingborough, Northamptonshire

Irthlingborough (Northamptonshire), 13th or 14th century

Many medieval bridges are isolated from the main traffic flow: Irthlingborough now has a rather precarious-looking 1930s concrete Art-Deco bypass running alongside it. But in the Middle Ages it was a main road: therefore it was an inevitable structure unlike the grand statement at Great Barford, and probably with much earlier origins. Ditchford, on the other hand, had no such modern rerouting and was very much in use, with signal lights controlling the two-way traffic not used to a group of architectural historians examining its structure (see featured image). This bridge, made largely of attractively-tinged ironstone, was funded by the two parishes of which it lay on the boundary line: charmingly expressed on the central cutwater by the symbols of churches’ dedicatees, St Peter and St Catherine.

Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire

Huntingdon to Godmanchester bridge, corbel table, c.1300-20

Two major urban bridges finished the trip. The very handsome bridge over the Great Ouse outside Huntingdon, called ‘lately built’ in 1322, reveals at close inspection its English eccentricities: different mouldings, designs and widths for every arch. It has the most attractive feature of a trefoil-arched corbel table, very much confirming the early-fourteenth-century date, which may have marked the place of a bridge chapel. Very few of these survived the Reformation: Wakefield, Rotherham, Bradford-upon-Avon and St Ives being the exception. However, we found the chapel over the Great Ouse locked, but had plenty to admire in the St Ives bridge itself: built in the 1420s at the behest of some generous Benedictines.

St Ives, Huntingdonshire

St Ives bridge and chapel, 1420s

While very rich and informative, this meeting established only mere stepping stones to the establishment of gephyrology as an active discipline. If you are a budding gephyrologist, especially of the medieval period (or at least, initially, hanging around with a bunch of medievalists) and would be interested in attending future meetings of this research group, then email Jana Gajdošová with your name, institutional affiliation and a brief description of your studies.

For the full resumé of pictures of the day (including cheeky opportunistic solo church visits) see the Flickr set.

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Shuffrey Junior Research Fellowships

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Shuffrey Junior Research Fellowships
Lincoln College, Oxford University
Deadline: Noon, 7 January 2014

290px-Lincoln_quad_frontLincoln College Oxford invites applications for two Junior Research Fellowships (JRFs) in Architectural History, tenable for a fixed term of four years from 1st September 2014. One Fellowship is dedicated to the support of research in the history of Greek and/or Roman architecture from 600 BC to AD 600. Applicants for the second Fellowship may work in any area of the history of architecture, or in the history of decorative design, from AD 600 to the present time.

Each of the Shuffrey Junior Research Fellows will be expected to undertake an approved programme of research, to provide up to four hours per week of undergraduate tuition for the College and to promote the study of architectural history through the organisation of seminars or lectures or by similar means. In addition to a stipend of £23,352 – £25,504 per annum, the Fellows will receive full common room rights, research and hospitality allowances, and membership of the USS pension scheme. College accommodation, suitable for a single person, will be provided at a modest rent if available.

Applicants should have been awarded a doctoral degree in an appropriate field not earlier than 1st September 2009, or should be expecting to complete a doctoral thesis before 1st October 2015, and will have a developing public profile within their field of scholarship. Candidates should not have held a stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship at another College.

Further particulars and an application form may be downloaded: here.