Tag Archives: medievalism

CFP: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018, Bloomington, Indiana

5487225791_f2f9dd3b91Call for Papers: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018,

Keynote: Elizabeth Allen, University of California, Irvine

The Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University invites proposals for its 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, April 6-7, 2018, in Bloomington, Indiana

Iron maidens, the Inquisition, the Crusades, witch burnings: these images of violence, both fact and fiction, are profoundly connected to the Middle Ages. Yet if in many popular conceptions, the medieval world is associated with brutality and suffering, the period also offers unique formulations of mercy, compassion, and the power of resistance. In exploring both medieval violence or nonviolence, this symposium seeks to examine specific structures of power and brutality but also to complicate the narrative of the violent Middle Ages.

We invite papers on any medieval discipline or region that engage issues of medieval violence and nonviolence: What functions did violence serve in the Middle Ages? How might acts of physical and rhetorical violence against othered groups (gendered, religious, cultural, racial, nonhuman) reflect larger concerns or anxieties within medieval culture? Is there a medieval aesthetic of violence? How does medieval music, art, theology, and literature glorify or critique brutality and/or suffering? How do medieval texts understand the uses and effects of verbal violence? How might medieval violence operate in a metaphorical sense, as violence done to texts or to the material past? What does nonviolence look like in the Middle Ages? Given the functions and pervasiveness of violence, what are some ways in which it is resisted and negotiated? What alternatives do medieval people or institutions offer to violence? How might medieval understandings of mercy or love act as a counter to violence? We also encourage papers on modern representations of the Middle Ages that consider to what extent and to what ends these medievalisms employ violence and nonviolence.

We are also excited to announce that graduate students whose papers have been accepted for the symposium are invited to submit their papers by March 2, 2018 to be considered for the IU Medieval Studies Symposium Paper Prize. Papers will be evaluated by a panel of IU medieval faculty. The prize of $250 will be awarded before the symposium to help defray the cost of travel, and the winner will be noted in the program.

Please submit 200 word abstracts or complete sessions proposals to IUMestSymposium@gmail.com by November 24, 2017.

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CONF: Chivalry Reimagined (Cambridge, 22 May 17)

German, documented 1513–1579 Equestrian Armour of Emperor Charles V

German, documented 1513–1579 Equestrian Armour of Emperor Charles V

The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, May 22, 2017

Armour Study Day
University of Cambridge, 22 May 2017

“Chivalry Reimagined: Collecting and Displaying Renaissance Armour in the Late 19th Century”

When: Monday, 22 May 2017, 9:00-4:30pm
Where: Museum Seminar Room, Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge Who: Open to all, £25 registration fee (includes lunch and tea/coffee)

In nineteenth-century Britain and the United States, a strong affinity for the medieval period permeated contemporary art, literature, and architecture. This interest was mirrored in the art market, and fine and decorative art collectors sought rare objects that romanticized centuries past. Armour was particularly prized among male collectors,
as it embodied the knightly virtues of honour, chivalry, and martial ability.

At this Armour Study Day, historians and curators from some of Europe’s most prominent museums will speak about collecting and display practices of Renaissance armour in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Who were the men that collected these objects, what qualities were considered favourable, and how did collectors and museums choose to display this armour once acquired?

Lunch and tea/coffee will be provided. The day will also include a handling session, giving attendees the opportunity to handle pieces of fifteenth and sixteenth century armour.

Programme:

9:00-9:30am: Registration (via Courtyard Entrance)

9:30-9:45am: Welcome, Tim Knox, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum

9:45-10:00am: Introductory remarks, Prof. Peter Mandler (University of Cambridge)

10:00-10:45am: Keynote speaker, Angus Patterson (Victoria & Albert Museum), “Ministrations to the Improvement of Society”: Electrotypes of Armour, 1850-1914

10:45-11:15am: Tea/coffee break (Courtyard)

11:15-12:00pm: Victoria Avery (Fitzwilliam Museum), Cambridge Connections and Collections: Arms and Armour at the Fitz

12:00-12:45pm: Stefan Krause (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna), The Imperial Collection of Arms and Armour in Vienna in the 19th and Early 20th Century

12:45-1:45pm: LUNCH (Courtyard)

1:45-2:15pm: Armour-handling session for attendees with Technician Andrew Maloney (Fitzwilliam Museum)

2:15-3:00pm: Victoria Bartels (University of Cambridge), The Courtship of a Collection: William H. Riggs and The Metropolitan Museum of Art

3:00-3:45pm: Tobias Capwell (Wallace Collection), A Museum of a Museum: The Past, Present and Future of the Galleries of Arms and Armour at the Wallace Collection, ca. 1880-2020

3:45-4:00pm: Closing remarks, Prof. Ulinka Rublack (University of Cambridge)

4:00-4:30pm: Afternoon Tea reception (Courtyard)

4:30pm: Delegates and speakers leave (via Courtyard Entrance)

For more information and/or to register, please visit
http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/calendar/whatson/armour-study-day

CFP: Archaising/Classicising/Medievalising (Oxford, 17 Jun 17)

downloadCentre for Classical Studies, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, June 17, 2017
Deadline: May 2, 2017

Call for Papers:
Archaising/Classicising /Medievalising:
Self-Historicisation and its Discontents

Saturday June 17,
Centre for Classical Studies,
Corpus Christi College,
Oxford

Texts, songs, buildings, or objects that consciously refer to themselves using the visual, aural, or architectural vocabulary of a previous era present both interesting historical and critical, as well as historiographic, questions. This one-day symposium intends to ask what self-historicising means in the widest possible variety of contexts and media, and to address some the of theoretical gaps in the study of objects that are aware of their own temporality. Medievalising tendencies in the text style or decoration of Early Modern printed books, for instance, raise questions about what constitutes ‘humanist’ or ‘Renaissance’ content, and the geographic assumptions of Italianate origin often associated with classicising and not medievalising. Other possible topics include seventeenth through nineteenth century classicisms and their implications for the Grand Tour, classicisms and colonialisms, Protestant and Catholic classicisms during the Reformation, the association between materiality and archaising in general, as well as archaising tendencies (Roman to Greek, Imperial Roman to Republican &c) in classical text and art itself. Participants from across the humanities and social sciences are invited to submit an approximately 250 word abstract for a 15-20 minute paper on any related
topic, with the goal of mutual discussion across disciplinary and period lines in common. Provisions for slides, audio, or other media display, will be made ahead of time, and lunch is included with the £15 conference fee.  Abstracts should be submitted by 2 May to Alexandra Marraccini at: avmarraccini@uchicago.edu.

CFP: Gaming the Medieval: Medievalism in Modern Board Game Culture (Leeds 2015)

Call for Papers
Gaming the Medieval: Medievalism in Modern Board Game Culture
International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 6-9 July 2015
Deadline: 15 September 2014

SincCarcassonne-gamee the early 1980s, the medieval has proven to be a fertile source of narrative concept, artwork and play structure in popular board and card game culture. In recent years, games with medieval subject matter such as Carcassonne, Dominion and Shadows Over Camelot have increasingly graced the top of European and American board game award tables.

Yet the ‘Middle Ages’ of the game world is a broadly defined concept. Games taking a historical approach might chart the economical and political landscape of Medieval Europe during a set period of time, while others base their play around a specific event or series of events.  In other cases, the medieval operates as a flexible cultural genre for games set in otherwise indeterminate times and places.  Although board and card games frequently engage with concepts of medieval warfare, conquest and expansion, they also hold the ability to promote a rich understanding of medieval cultural, literary and social practices such as courtly love and chivalric narrative, Arthurian legend, guild, mercantile and political hierarchy, and alchemical motifs such as the magic circle.

While the role of the game in medieval society and literature commands a strong critical legacy (for example, in the works of Clopper, Huizinga and Vale), this session aims to evaluate what happens when the medieval is made present within modern game culture.  This is an area that has been largely neglected by studies of medievalism, which have tended to chiefly focus on the use of the medieval in computer gaming.  This session therefore intends to expand the cultural medievalism debate by drawing attention to the ways in which the materiality of board and card games produces new methods of intersecting with the medieval past.

Possible themes might include:

• What is a ‘medieval’ board game?
• Courts, cities, fields, monasteries
• Chivalry, courtly love and other ‘medieval’ ideals
• Materiality and play, medieval artwork, and the game as artefact
• Gender, power and characterisation
• Performance, roleplay, and crossplaying
• Narrative and playing structures
• Place, space and time
• Games and pedagogy – using games to teach ‘medieval’ concepts
• Figuring the medieval ‘orient’ in game culture

Please send abstracts of 250 words to Daisy Black at D.Black@hull.ac.uk and James Howard at jwhowa2@emory.edu before the 15th September 2014.