Tag Archives: Medieval textiles

#MetGala In All Its Glory

We’ve now had a week to digest the photos, the fashion, and the inevitable memes of Met Gala 2018. Hopefully a week has been enough time to take in the weird, wonderful, and worshipful experience that was this year’s annual fundraiser for the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute. Each year the gala’s theme is based on the Institute’s summer exhibition, and on 10 May Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination opened at both the Met’s 5th Avenue and Cloisters locations. Kim Kardashian was compared to a Eucharist chalice, haloes abounded, and ‘Rihanna going full pope’ is now a phrase.

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Seminar: Medieval Textiles: Meaning and Materiality, 25th November 2016

jacobusBirkbeck Medieval Seminar: Medieval Textiles: Meaning and Materiality

On the occasion of the V&A Museum’s unprecedented exhibition of opus anglicanum, this one-day interdisciplinary conference brings together leading and emerging scholars working on questions of meaning and materiality in medieval textiles, both real and imaginary.

 

The conference is organised by Birkbeck Medieval Seminar and the History of Art Department with support of the Murray Bequest. The programme, and details of how to book can be found at: https://medtex.eventbrite.co.uk

Friday 25th November, 2016, 10.00am -5.00pm.

Birkbeck, University of London, Room 101, 30 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DT

Conference: Textile Gifts in the Middle Ages (Rome, 3-5 November 2016)

medieval-textile-images0002Gifts of textiles and clothing appeared in diverse contexts and fulfilled various functions in pre-modern Europe. They could be offered in the course of an initiation rite and or an act of social transition, including upon investiture, marriage, or entry into a monastery. Gifts of clothing to the poor, meanwhile, were among the works of charity
thematized in the vitae of numerous medieval saints. Sumptuous textiles were sent as resplendent gifts to religious institutions or, like
patterned silk textiles from Byzantium, circulated through diplomatic gift exchanges. Gifts of clothing were also distributed within the court as compensation in kind, which supported the structuralization and hierarchization of courtly society. Textile gifts could represent the donor. Especially in the case of clothing previously worn by its donor, the physical presence of the giver might have been woven into the materiality and form of the gifted garment.

The goal of this interdisciplinary conference is to situate the diversity and polysemy of such acts of symbolic communication into the broader context of medieval gift culture. The integration of
anthropological and sociological models (Marcel Mauss, Bruno Latour) into an art historical approach allows for gifted artifacts to be taken seriously as independent entities within the giving process as a socially generative form of communication. The conference therefore
investigates the relationship between human actors and the “agency” of gifts themselves, exploring  how the dynamics of reciprocity and its attendant obligations were charged both visually and materially.

For the programme, please visit <http://arthist.net/archive/13867>.