Tag Archives: interdiciplinary

BAA Post-Graduate Conference – Saturday 23rd November 2019

Join us for the first British Archaeological Association Post-graduate Conference.

We are excited to present a diverse conference which includes postgraduates and early career researchers in the fields of medieval history of art, architecture, and archaeology.

The BAA postgraduate conference offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present their research and exchange ideas with fellow members of the BAA.

 

Tickets:

  • BAA Student Member Ticket – Free
  • Student Ticket – £5.00
  • Non-Student Ticket – £10.00

Get your tickets here: https://baapostgradconf.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

Conference Programme

9:30am – 9:50am – Registration

 

9:50am – 10:00am – Welcome

 

10:00am – 11:20am – Cultural imagination and Identity

Chair: Professor Sandy Heslop, University of East Anglia

Ryan Low (Harvard University)Seeing Identity in Crusader Colonial Ceramics

Netta Clavner (Birkbeck University of London)Defining Social Order: The Civic Scene of Medieval Bristol

Lily Hawker-Yates (Christ Church Canterbury University)Interpretations of Barrows in Later Medieval England

 

11:20am – 11:40am – Refreshment Break

 

11:40 am – 12:40pm – Landscape and Urban Space 

Chair: Dr Alexandra Gajewski, The Burlington Magazine/Institute of Historical Research, London

Dana Katz (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)The Lake Effect: An Environmental Case Study of Landscape Transformation at the Royal Parkland of La Favara in Medieval Sicily

Richard Nevell (University of Exeter)The Archaeology of Destruction in the Middle Ages

 

12:40pm -13:40pm – Lunch (provided)

 

13:45pm – 15:00pm – Iconography and Interpretation

Chair: Dr Emily Guerry, University of Kent

Dustin S. Aaron (Institute of Fine Arts, New York University)Revisiting the Meaning of Mouths on the Austro-Bavarian Frontier

Innocent Smith, op (Universität Regensburg)Representatio Representationis: Depictions of the Mass in 13th-century Missals

Muriel Araujo Lima (University of São Paulo)Sinful Nature: Creation Cycles, Moralizing Content and Figurative Exegesis in Medieval Bestiaries

 

15:00pm – 15:15pm – Refreshment Break

 

15:15pm – 16:15pm – Visualising the Cult of Saints

Chair: Professor Michael Michael, Research Fellow, School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow

Angela Websdale (University of Kent), The Cult of Saint Edward the Confessor and the Influence of Westminster Palace and Henry III’s Maison Dieu at Ospringe upon the Gothic Wall Paintings in Faversham

Katie Toussaint-Jackson (University of Kent)The Wall Paintings of Horsham St Faith and their Medieval Modifications

 

16:15pm – 16:30pm – Comfort Break

 

16:30pm – 17:45pm – Sculptures and Masons: Artistic agency, patronage and construction

Chair: John McNeill, Hon. Secretary, BAA

Aurora Corio (University of Genova)Lombard Sculptors in Western Tuscany at the heart of the Duecento: The case of St. Martino in Lucca

Teresa Martínez (Instituto de Historia, CCHS-CSIC/ University of Warwick)The petrification of Zamora: A specific answer to general questions about Construction and Society in the Middle Ages.

 

17:45pm – 18:00pm – Closing Remarks

 

NB: We will be providing a light lunch and refreshments to all attending. Please let us know if you have any dietary requirements: postgradconf@thebaa.org

Tickets:

  • BAA Student Member Ticket – Free
  • Student Ticket – £5.00
  • Non-Student Ticket – £10.00

Get your tickets here: https://baapostgradconf.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

CFP: Durham University MEMSA Conference (July 2016)

durham elevation.jpgMEMSA CONFERENCE 14-15 JULY 2016

MEMSA is pleased to announce its tenth annual conference on the theme of

Identifying Identity: Ideas of Personal and Public Identity in the Medieval and Early Modern World.
This interdisciplinary conference will invite postgraduate and early career researchers to speak on all aspects of identity. We welcome papers from all disciplines studying identity in the medieval and early modern world. Identity is an increasingly important subject in academic research that transcends interdisciplinary boundaries. Identity and the methodologies we use to find and communicate evidence of identity in literary, historical, archaeological and other sources are relevant to both our own lives today, as well as the medieval and early modern world we study.

Suggestions for topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Performed identities
  • Transnational identity and conflict
  • National and local, macro and micro-identities
  • Ownership, artistry and patronage in private and public buildings
  • Mistaken identity and deception
  • Authorship and attributions in texts
  • Gender and sexual identities
  • Imagined community
  • Urban and rural identities
  • Identification with literary figures
  • Medieval and early modern ideas of the self
  • Religious identities
  • Kinship, community and neighbourhood
  • Expressions of identity in ego-documents

In addition to the panels the conference will include two key note lectures by Prof Andrew Beresford (Durham University) and Dr Fiona Edmonds (University of Cambridge) and opportunities for delegates to visit Durham Cathedral and Castle. The conference fee will be £10, which will cover costs for refreshments and lunch.

Papers should be 15-20 minutes long and will be followed by time for questions and discussion. Abstracts of 200-300 words can be sent to imrs.memsa@durham.ac.uk. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 10 April 2016.

For more information and updates, visit dur.ac.uk/imems/memsa, our blog durhammemsa.wordpress.com, and follow us on twitter @DurhamMEMSA.

CFP: Discipline and Excess (Cambridge Friday, April 15, 2016)

BelliniDISCIPLINE AND EXCESS

A Graduate and Early Career Conference, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

Friday, April 15, 2016

CFP Deadline:  1st February 2016

We invite paper proposals for Discipline and Excess, a conference which seeks to consider questions relating to boundaries and their transgression until 1750. The theme invites diverse interpretations of “discipline”—moral, religious, cultural, aesthetic, generic, geographic—in papers which explore the realms of penance and perfection, challenge the orderliness implicit in systems of knowledge, or examine the nature of punishment and retribution.

The conference is aimed at early career scholars and graduate students from a range of academic fields. Discipline and Excess is organized by the M.Phil programs in Medieval, Renaissance, and 18th-Century Literature at the Faculty of English. Our external respondent will be Dr. Helen Barr, Associate Professor at the University of Oxford.

Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes. Please email 250-word abstracts (text only, no attachments) by 1st February 2016 to disciplineandexcess2016@gmail.com.

Possible topics may include:

Crime and Punishment

Bounds of the Mind

Feast and Fast

Disciplining the Body

Exceeding the Page

Intertextuality

Sin, Play, Transgression

Rhetorical Limits

Disciplinary Boundaries

Material

CFP Discipline and Excess Cambridge April 2016-2

CFP: Dialogue and Difference in the Middle Ages (University of Bristol, February 25-6, 2016)

sageandfool-283pxDialogue and Difference is an interdisciplinary conference bringing together scholars from all fields to explore the ways in which cultural, social, political, religious, scientific and intellectual exchange and interaction unfolded throughout the Middle Ages. Dialogues took place both across borderlines and within the heart of medieval societies, in monasteries, universities, courts and market places as well as on battlefields and high-roads. How did these dialogues shape the societies of the Middle Ages, and how did new ideas, people and cultures interact with old? Did difference lead to conflict, or to coexistence?

This conference aims to explore these issues across societies from medieval Europe, Byzantium, the Near East and beyond, and spanning from Late Antiquity to the 16th century.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • societies built on cultural, political and religious borders
  • inter-religious dialogue and polemic
  • the emergence of the university
  • conquest and colonisation
  • heresy and reform
  • inter and intra-textual dialogues
  • gender and the body
  • technological or scientific developments
  • conversion and assimilation
  • material histories and the dialogue of artefacts

Postgraduate and early-career researchers are invited to submit abstracts of 200-300 words for 20 minute papers

We are also accepting abstracts of 100 words for 10 minute flash papers, or 100 words for poster presentations

All abstracts are to be submitted by Wednesday 25th November 2015 to Sophie and Teresa, at: sophie.burton@bristol.ac.uk and teresa.witcombe@bristol.ac.uk

For all additional information, please contact:sophie.burton@bristol.ac.uk and teresa.witcombe@bristol.ac.uk