Tag Archives: Architecture

Job: Professor of History of Architecture and Urban Theory, University of Cologne

The Department of Art History at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of Cologne invites applications for a Professorship (W2) in the History of Architecture and Urban Theory to begin by October 1, 2019.
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Secret Spaces: Medieval Sacristies, Vestries, Treasure Rooms and their Contents

salisbury-cathedral_549x432

Salisbury Cathedral Treasure House, Upper Champber, from “Pituresque Memorials of Salisbury” by Peter Hall (1834), courtesy of the Society of Antiquaries.

The aim of the conference is to introduce the subject of ecclesiastical treasure houses to both the academic world and the wider public.

Treasure houses take the form of small buildings attached as annexes to the cathedrals and churches which they served. Their function as store houses of the priceless ecclesiastical treasure belonging to the church meant that they were accessible to only a few privileged individuals but many are resplendent pieces of architecture in their own right. Recently Yves Gallet, in discussing an ambitious vault within the thirteenth-century treasure house of Saint-Urbain, Troyes, noted that ‘it is curious that they should have placed such a spectacular and up-to-date ornament in a place where it was never going to be seen’. Notable treasure houses in Britain are attached to the cathedrals of Canterbury, Lincoln, Wells, and Bristol, to name but a few. However, medieval ecclesiastical treasure houses existed everywhere in the medieval West and this will be reflected in the conference, which will bring together scholars from different countries. Ecclesiastical treasure houses also stored money, the presence of which necessitated the activities of depositing, guarding and counting. The ecclesiastical treasure house thus occupied a fault line between two opposing ideologies in medieval Christian thinking, the first condemning the accumulation of worldly treasure and the second promoting its use for God’s service.

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Arte, Architettura e Umanesimo a Bologna, 1446-1530 (Bologna, 13-15 Jun 2018)

humanism, bolognaBologna (Italia), June 13 – 15, 2018

Dipartimento delle Arti, Complesso di S. Cristina, piazzetta G. Morandi 2 – Bologna

Bologna non è unanimemente riconosciuta come una delle capitali dell’Umanesimo, al pari di Firenze e Padova. Tuttavia la qualità delle scelte operate in campo artistico sottintende un rinnovamento culturale che gli studi moderni hanno cominciato a indagare. Da sempre crocevia di esperienze, anche nel Rinascimento Bologna riuscì a produrre e attrarre talenti d’eccellenza che seppero naturalizzarsi nel contesto cittadino e ricavarne nuovi spunti di riflessione e di creazione. Ne nacque, anche grazie all’ambiziosa magnificenza del clan bentivolesco e alla perdurante vitalità dell’antico Studium, una civiltà figurativa, architettonica e letteraria omogenea e ben connotata, capace di muoversi tra stravaganze eccentriche e punte di rustica classicità. Un processo che non si interruppe nemmeno dopo la traumatica cacciata degli stessi Bentivoglio, ma che anzi toccò un apice nel 1530, quando la solenne incoronazione di Carlo V riportò Bologna al centro della scena continentale.
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CONF: An Abbey Between Two Worlds San Nicolò in San Gemini and the Dislocation of Monumental Artworks in the first Half of the 20th Century (8-9 June 2018)

San Nicolo doorway

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Abbey’s restoration (1967-2017), the conference will address the phenomenon of legal exportation and reinstallation of monumental

complexes and oversized artworks in the first half of the 20th century. The Abbey’s portal, which arrived in the United States in 1936 and stands today at the entrance of the medieval collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, will serve as the starting point to examine the circumstances around the exportation of works from Italy until the Second World War.

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CFP: Crossing Rivers in Byzantium and Beyond (Vienna, 2-3 Nov 18) (Deadline 1 June 18)

Crossing Rivers in Byzantium and Beyond

Department of Art History, University of Vienna, 02. – 03.11.2018
Deadline: Jun 1, 2018

“It is always dramatic to cross a frontier, even though the frontier is only a brook”
(V. S. Pritchett, Geographical Magazine, December, 1942)

This workshop is organized as part of the project “Byzantine Stone Bridges: Material Evidence and Cultural Meaning,” managed by Dr. Galina Fingarova at the Department of Art History of the University of Vienna. It is generously funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), Elise-Richter-Program. For further information, see http://bridges.univie.ac.at/.

This project focuses on a long-overlooked aspect of architectural and cultural history – Byzantine stone bridges. It investigates the particularities of this type of architectural monuments built from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries on territories under imperial Byzantine rule. It addresses the following enquiries: 1) reconstructing the
significance of Byzantine stone bridges in the context of architectural history by analyzing the structural and technical innovations that are evident in the preserved monuments; and 2) understanding the importance of bridges as sources for a Byzantine cultural and social history, in particular, on a political, symbolic, and metaphorical level.

This workshop will expand on the project’s research questions and methodological approaches by placing these in a broader context. The workshop encourages an interdisciplinary discourse on the unique characteristic of rivers to define territories and boundaries and on their crossing as a means of connection in a real and figurative sense. It seeks to transcend both the territorial and chronological limits of the Byzantine Empire.

Confirmed Keynote: Professor Jim Crow (University of Edinburgh)

Scholars working in the fields of Roman, Late Antique, Byzantine, Medieval, Ottoman, and Middle Eastern Studies
are invited to submit proposals for 20-minute papers connected with but not limited to the following topics:
• Riverine landscapes;
• River crossings as political, social, military, or commercial events;
• Urban and rural communities on and along rivers;
• Architectural and engineering achievements in hydrology;
• Ford and ferry;
• Pontoon, wooden, and stone bridges;
• Related structures such as aqueducts, mills, etc.;
• Mythological and religious aspects of river crossings;
• Emotional experiences at or traversing rivers.

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words, including a title and an abstract, together with a short CV to Dr. Galina Fingarova (galina.fingarova@univie.ac.at) by June 1, 2018.

BURSARIES Vernacular Architecture Group Spring Conference 3rd-7th April 2018 Application Deadline 3rd March 2018

VAG Image  SPRING CONFERENCE BURSARY – 2018

The 2018 Spring Conference of the Vernacular Architecture Group will be held at Bangor
University in North Wales from Tuesday 3 April until Saturday 7 April 2018. During the day members will tour the locality, visiting and interpreting lesser traditional buildings; lecturesand discussions will be held in the evenings. The visits will cover Anglesey (Wednesday), the Denbighshire Clwyd and Upper Dee valleys (Thursday) and the Conwy valley (Friday). Evening speakers will include Andrew Davidson, David Gwyn, Richard Suggett and Richard Bebb.

The Vernacular Architecture Group is able to offer three bursaries to assist registered
students or professionals in the early years of their career to attend the Conference. The
Committee is aware that the cost often makes attendance difficult for students and others who might benefit from the lectures and discussions, and from the opportunity to meet people active in the field. There is no age limit, and both full-time and part-time students are welcome to apply.

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Books roundup: New Books by Brepols Publishers on Medieval Architecture

AMA_08Decorated Revisited
English Architectural Style in Context, 1250-1400

Edited by John Munns

 ISBN 978-2-503-55434-1

Thirty-Five years after the publication of Jean Bony’s seminal work on the so-called Decorated style of English architecture (The English Decorated Style: Gothic Architecture Transformed, 1979), this volume brings together a selection of groundbreaking essays by the most promising emerging scholars of English medieval architecture, together with contributions by two of the leading established authorities on the subject: Nicola Coldstream (The Decorated Style: Architecture and Ornament, 1240-1360, 1994) and Paul Binski (Gothic Wonder: Art, Artifice, and the Decorated Style, 1290–1350, 2014).

The contributors revisit Bony’s work and reassess the scholarly legacy of the past three-and-a-half decades. Drawing on a range of innovative methodologies, they then present exciting new insights into the nature and significance of English architecture in the period, focusing particularly on its broader European context. The essays are developed from papers delivered as part of a major seminar series at the University of Cambridge in 2013-14.

John Munns teaches the history of medieval art at the University of Cambridge since 2011, where he is a Fellow and Director of Studies at Magdalene College.

More info: http://bit.ly/2lfNQ8K

 

AMA_09Memory and Redemption
Public Monuments and the Making of Late Medieval Landscape

By Achim Timmerann

 ISBN 978-2-503-54652-0

Erected in large numbers from about 1200 onwards, and featuring increasingly sophisticated designs, wayside crosses and other edifices in the public sphere – such as fountains, pillories and boundary markers – constituted the largest network of images and monuments in the late medieval world. Not only were they everywhere, they were also seen by nearly everyone, because large sections of the populace were constantly on the move. Carrying an entire spectrum of religious, folkloric and judicial beliefs, these monuments were indeed at the very heart of late medieval life. This is the first critical study of these fascinating and rich structures written by a medievalist art historian. Focusing on the territories of the former Holy Roman Empire, this investigation considers such important edifices as the towering wayside crosses of Wiener Neustadt and Brno or the elaborate pillories of Kasteelbrakel and Wrocław, though less ostentatious works such as the Bildstöcke of Franconia and Carinthia or the high crosses of Westphalia and the Rhineland are equally examined. In addition, the study looks at the homiletic, literary, devotional and artistic imagination, in which wayside crosses and other such structures helped constitute a spiritual and allegorical landscape that very much complemented and put pressure on the physical landscapes traversed and inhabited by the contemporary public.

Achim Timmerann teaches medieval and northern Renaissance art and architecture at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is author of Real Presence: Sacrament Houses and the Body of Christ, c. 1270-1600.

More Info: http://bit.ly/2xELbLf