Tag Archives: transmission

CFP: ICMA sponsored session: ‘MOVING MATERIALS: Medium, Meanings, and Technique in Transit,’ Leeds International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 1–4 July 2019

1024px-vase_de_cristal_d27alic3a9norDeadline: 21 September 2018

MOVING MATERIALS: Medium, Meanings, and Technique in Transit, Leeds International Medieval Congress (thematic strand: Materialities), University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 1-4 July 2019

Sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) Student Committee
Organized by D. Esther Kim (Toronto),  Maggie Crosland (Courtauld), and Xin Yue (Sylvia) Wang (Toronto)

The materials of the medieval artist, artisan, and architect were constantly on the move, travelling from one part of the globe to another through trade, gifting, looting, or theft. Likewise, the localized techniques of working with materials and media could travel near and far, through the movement of artists and objects, as well as written and visual descriptions such as artist manuals and travel guides.

While on the move, travelling materials such as stone and marble, metals, fur, textiles, coral, ivory, and pigment—and techniques of working with these materials—might retain their original meanings and function; or they could be integrated with local media, refined, or even significantly transformed to something drastically different, to suit the ideologies and ambitions of their destination.

This panel aims to engage with materials and techniques in transit, as well as the (trans)regionality of their meanings and significations, by asking: are we still able to trace the ‘origin’ and ‘originality’ of certain materials, techniques, and their meanings? How then would the fluidity and transformation of techniques affect our understanding when we are trying to ascribe a certain technique to a particular culture or region? How are old, new, and combined meanings assessed and understood in the Middle Ages and in scholarship today?

Possible topics of discussion include, but are not limited to: global movements and dissemination of artists and/or their materials and techniques; modes of transmission; regional/transregional meaning and significance of materials and techniques; reuse and repurposing of existing materials and/or artworks; reasons for shifts in meaning and function of materials within and outside particular regions; the integration of materials and medium, and intermediality; trans-temporal/ trans-regional use of spolia, among others.

How to apply: We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from graduate student ICMA members, and encourage interdisciplinary submissions from students researching all parts of the globe from c.400-c.1500. To propose a paper, please send a title, abstract of up to 250 words, and CV to the organizers (de.kim@mail.utoronto.ca, margaret.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk, xw388@nyu.edu) by 21 September, 2018.

The International Center for Medieval Art Student Committee involves and advocates for all members of the ICMA with student status and facilitates communication and mentorship between student and non-student members.

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Call for papers: Art, Artists, Materials and Ideas Crossing Borders (Cambridge, 15-16 Nov 18)

HKI_location_image_1.jpgHamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge, UK, November 15 – 16, 2018
Deadline: Feb 28, 2018

“Migrants: Art, Artists, Materials and Ideas Crossing Borders”

This two-day conference organised by the Hamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge, will reflect on the role of migration as embodied in works of art and material culture as documented in visual and written sources.
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Call for Papers: Transmissions and Translations in the Medieval World

 

logo2 – 3 June 2018

Kings Manor, University of York

Keynote: Professor Roger Stalley

The Conference

The concepts of transmission and translation are central to the evolution of the pan-European multi-cultural nature of medieval society. Cross-cultural connections in the political arena, mercantile trade routes, the dissemination of Christianity and interactions with Islam and Judaism resulted in the appropriation and assimilation of practices, ideas and arts throughout the medieval world. These transactions were enabled by numerous factors and generated new fusions of style in architecture, art and iconography, literature and lifestyles which together importantly informed attitudes towards the self and others, senses of belonging and ownership, as well as conceptions of regionality. While these areas of enquiry have been much discussed in relation to contemporary society in sociological and anthropological scholarship, there remains much to explore about how they were articulated and achieved during the Middle Ages: what types of objects were transported and for what purpose(s); the impact of language on the transmission of ideas through manuscripts, literature and poetry; iconographic borrowings and theological impetus; processes of production; engagement with their societies of origin and those they infiltrated.

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CFP: Warburg Institute Postgraduate Symposium (17 November 2016)

b84e669807Cultural Encounters:

Tensions and Polarities of Transmission from the Late Middle Ages to the Enlightenment

17 November 2016

The Warburg Institute will host its first Postgraduate Symposium on 17 November 2016. It will explore the concept of cultural encounters and focus particularly on their productive outcomes. We are interested, above all, in the dynamics of cultural change across time and space. The Symposium will be multidisciplinary, and will cover topics that fall into the unique classification system of the Warburg Library: Image, Word, Orientation and Action.

The aim of the Symposium will be to map the diverse and intricate forces which have driven cultural encounters in the past and which also help define contemporary societies. Amongst the questions that we hope to address are: the degree to which productive outcomes can be seen as a conscious reception and reformulation of external ideas and models; resistances to exchange and in what form; the long-term implications of such encounters and their outcomes.

The Symposium is intended for postgraduate students and early career researchers. It will bring together speakers from different backgrounds in the humanities and draw on a variety of disciplinary tools and methodologies. Submissions are invited across a wide range of topics represented by the global cultural interests of the Warburg Institute, including but not limited to:

* Artistic creations: forms, models, styles;

* Literary productions and transmission of texts: translations, adaptations, copies;

* Philosophy, rhetoric and transmission of ideas;

* Personal encounters: Academies, universities and epistolary exchanges;

* Encounters with the ancient past: reception, interpretation, visualisation;

* Religious encounters, propaganda and politics;

* Geographical discoveries: new continents, new cultures and animal species, etc.

* Scientific innovation: findings, theories, inner contradictions, etc.

Proposals for papers should be sent to warburg.postgrad(at)gmail.com by 31 May 2016:

* Maximum 300-word abstract, in English, for a 20-minute paper, in PDF or Word format.

* One-page CV, including full name, affiliation, contact information.

All candidates will be notified by 31 July 2016. Limited funding to help cover travel expenses is available. Attendance is free of charge.

For more information and news about The Warburg Institute Postgraduate Symposium 2016 visit https://warburgpostgrad.wordpress.com/

Organisers: Desirée Cappa, Maria Teresa Chicote Pompanin, James Christie, Lorenza Gay, Hanna Gentili, Federica Gigante, Finn Schulze-Feldmann.

CFP: Pastoralia in the Late Middle Ages: Teaching, Translation, Transmission

pastoraliaCall for Papers: Pastoralia in the Late Middle Ages: Teaching, Translation, Transmission,
The University of Kent, Canterbury, June 24-25, 2016
Deadline: 18 March 2016

Pastoralia–the corpora of catechetical, homiletic and pastoral texts designed to aid in teaching the tenets of Christianity to the laity –flourished in the wake of the Fourth Lateran Council’s plea for the clergy to take their pastoral duties more seriously, and the subsequent ecclesiastical legislation enacted to implement this.
In England, Pecham’s Lambeth Constitutions (1281) outlined the pastoral syllabus that was to be taught in the province of Canterbury, whilst similar legislation was enacted to cover the province of York. In recent years, a great deal of scholarly attention has begun to focus on the surviving texts that were composed to help the clergy carry out these pastoral duties. This conference seeks to investigate the utility and efficacy of pastoralia, and the ways in which the laity responded to these developments.

Papers might consider:

  • Evidence of manuscript transmission: production, acquisition, and circulation; individuals, institutions, and networks.
  • The transmission of ideas: from the university to the parish, the cloister to the tavern.
  • Translatio and its many interpretations: contemporary translations of Latin texts into the vernacular, and vice versa; modern principles of translating and editing texts.
  • Teaching: the efficacy of pastoralia as a catechetical tool; how pastoral discourse was controlled, appropriated, and contested.

Keynote papers by Prof. Ralph Hanna and Prof. John Arnold

Submission: send abstracts by 18 March 2016 to pastoralia2016@gmail.com