Tag Archives: image

CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

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CFPs: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017

tumblr_nid8xdrz0n1soj7s4o4_500Call for Papers: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017
Deadline: October 25, 2016

For more information on panels, round-tables, short presentations and working groups, and for submission guidelines, see: http://rarebookschool.org/bibliography-conference-2017/

Bibliography Among the Disciplines, a four-day international conference to be held in Philadelphia from 12 to 15 October 2017, will bring together scholarly professionals poised to address current problems pertaining to the study of textual artifacts that cross scholarly, pedagogical, professional, and curatorial domains. The conference will explore theories and methods common to the object-oriented disciplines, such as anthropology and archaeology, but new to bibliography. The Bibliography Among the Disciplines program, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to promote focused cross-disciplinary exchange and future scholarly collaborations. The conference sessions will include both traditional and innovative formats: plenary addresses, short presentations, roundtables, workshops, working groups, and site visits. Calls for Proposals and Participants (CFPs) are listed below. The project will culminate in 2019 with a volume of essays contributed by conference participants. The conference and subsequent volume will seek to build on the ongoing series of symposia conducted by Rare Book School’s Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography, established in 2012 through funding from the Foundation.

Call for Papers- Panels:

Graphic Representation: Illustration & Diagrams
Session Organizers: Claire Eager (University of Virginia), Jeannie Kenmotsu (University of Pennsylvania)

Textual Instruments
Session Organizer: Nick Wilding (Georgia State University)

Questions of Scale, Production & Labor
Session Organizer: Juliet Sperling (University of Pennsylvania)

Transmission & Transfer of Images
Session Organizer: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley

Degradation, Loss, Recovery & Fragmentation
Session Organizer: Jane Raisch (University of California, Berkeley)

Materiality of Digital Objects
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

The Social Life of Books: Uses of Text & Image Beyond Reading & Viewing
Session Organizers: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley), Hannah Marcus (Harvard University), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Books as Agents of Contact
Session Organizers: Hansun Hsiung (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science), András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Yael Rice (Amherst College)

Manuscript in the Age of Print
Session Organizers: Rachael King (University of California, Santa Barbara), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation
Session Organizer: Lauren Jennings (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Comparative Histories of the Book
Session Organizers: Megan McNamee (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Reappraising the Redundant: The Value of Copies in the Study of Textual Artifacts
Session Organizer: Kappy Mintie (University of California, Berkeley)n and

Call for Papers – Roundtables:

Performance, Textuality & Orality
Session Organizer: Glenda Goodman (University of Pennsylvania)

Authorship
Session Organizers: András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Digitization, Representation & Access
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

Materiality as a Sustainable Humanistic Discourse
Session Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Ethics & Responsibility in the Bibliosphere
Session Organizer: Claire Eager (University of Virginia)

 Call for papers – Short Presentations:

Tools for Data Analysis & Visualization
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

Innovative Pedagogy with Material Objects
Session Organizer: Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Teaching Global Book History
Session Organizers: Devin Fitzgerald (Harvard University) & Ben Nourse (University of Denver)

Dynamics of Digital Collections
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

The Book and Its Time: Developing a ‘Period Eye’
Session Organizer: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire (Winterthur Museum)

Call for Papers: Working Groups:

Globalizing Book History & Bibliography
Working Group Organizers: Hwisang Cho (Xavier University), Ben Nourse (University of Denver), Rachel Stein (Columbia University in the City of New York)

Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines
Working Group Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Courtney Roby (Cornell University)