Monthly Archives: March 2017

Summer School: University and Diversity (Bologna, 6-14 Oct 17)

700px-bologna_panoramaSummer School: University and Diversity, Bologna, October 6 – 14, 2017
Deadline: May 1, 2017

University and Diversity: The Bolognese Experience (1088-2017)
Studienkurs of the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz –Max-Planck-Institut

In 2013, the Municipality of Bologna set up a competition to find a
logo that represents ‘at a local, national and international level’ all
the ‘features and elements that make up the face of the city’. The
winning project ‘è Bologna’ provides a visual translation of the
endless perceptions of the city, linking letters to geometrical forms
inspired by archetypical Bolognese images, such as the city walls and
the brick mosaic of Santo Stefano. By typing a script, these forms are
superimposed with fixed proportions and chromatic relationships. Thus,
written words generate different but related signs that render the
‘multiplicity of elements which describe Bologna’.

The 2017 Summer School (Studienkurs) of the KHI focuses on
‘universitas’ and ‘diversitas’, concepts that are emblematic of Bologna
from the medieval to the modern period. The idea that the sum of all
things comprises a whole entity (‘universum’) provides a starting point
for exploring the city, whose urban fabric is characterized by its
former canals, medieval towers and porticoes. Bologna’s university, the
‘Alma Mater Studiorum’, considered to be founded in 1088, encapsulates
the city’s manifest identities through its original organization as a
conglomeration of loose societies called ‘nations’; the teaching of
canon and civil law and medicine; and the training of personages such
as Petrarch, Leon Battista Alberti and Copernicus. Bologna as a
cosmopolitan city is shaped further by its relationship to religious
institutions (the Dominicans and the Papacy, for example); by persons
acting on an ‘international’ scale, such as the Bentivoglio, Gabriele
Paleotti, Ugo Buoncompagni (Pope Gregory  XIII), Pier Paolo Pasolini;
and by the artworks within the city of Nicola Pisano, Giotto, Raphael,
Giambologna or the Carracci. Carlo Cesare Malvasia, writing in the
seventeenth century, described Bologna as the ‘metropolis of a kingdom’
due to its role as the capital of ancient Etruria and as the ‘school of
the universe’ for having taught philosophy, letters and religion before
all other cities. The images of the city as an important geographical
crossroad linking central and northern Italy to the rest of Europe and
as hub of learning, culture and avant-garde thinking pervades into
modern times. They impacted, for example, the tragic bombing of the
city during World War II or the Neo-Fascist attack at the Central
Station in 1980, a site that in recent years witnessed the construction
of the Alta ‘velocità’ railway, with its projected architectural
complex by Isozaki-Maffei.

The seemingly disparate histories of Bologna will be explored through
notions of ‘universitas’ and ‘diversitas’ in an attempt to better
understand the common links that, just as in the dynamic logo, comprise
the character of the city and will allow the Summer School to engage,
more generally, with the mechanisms that contribute to the cultural
constructions of multi-faceted urban centres and their relationship to
surrounding and interconnected environments. Shifting between
synchronic and diachronic approaches, topics to be explored, through
individual presentations and discussions, include: Santo Stefano and
its artistic and religious connections to the Eastern Mediterranean;
Bolognese manuscript illumination and its ‘international’ impact; the
open-air tombs of professors of law and medicine; ‘foreign’ cults
within the city, such as the Madonna di San Luca and the Madonna of
Guadalupe; spaces as places for display and as sites of alterity:
relics, bodies and burials of saints (e.g., St Dominic and St Caterina
Vigri), anatomical waxes, collections of natural objects and artefacts
with transcultural trajectories, especially to the New World and the
Ottoman Empire, and their role in the history of science and scientific
knowledge (Ulisse Aldrovandi and Ferdinando Cospi); as well as the
writing of artistic traditions and the so-called Bolognese School of
Painting. How does the city space and the civic cultures embodied
within it participate in connecting the local with the universal? How
can shifting notions of university/universality and diversity be
described and analyzed within the interplay of individuals and groups
that together make up the experience of the city?

The KHI Summer School invites applications from the fields of Art
History and related disciplines, from graduate students, doctoral
candidates and scholars who are embarking on post-doctoral research.
The number of participants is restricted to fifteen. Each participant
is expected to contribute to the success of the course not only with a
presentation, but also by actively engaging in the discussions. To
allow for active participation in the discussion, good passive
knowledge of Italian and German is required. The Institute will bear
the cost of accommodation and will reimburse half of the incurred
travelling expenses; in addition, participants will receive a daily
allowance.

Applications should include: a letter of interest comprising a research
statement, a one-page Curriculum vitae and a presentation proposal (ca.
300 words). These materials can be written in English, Italian or
German.

Please send your documents by 1 May 2017 in a single PDF file (max. 2
MB), referencing ‘Studienkurs 2017’, to the attention of Prof. Dr.
Gerhard Wolf (dirwolf@khi.fi.it).

Concept and organization: Annette Hoffmann, Marco Musillo, Jessica N.
Richardson and Gerhard Wolf

Advertisements

CFP: The Art of Ornament. Meaning, Archetypes, Forms and Uses, Lisboa, November 23 – 25, 2017

199354720975162159ekrxrxpmcConference: The Art of Ornament. Meaning, Archetypes, Forms and Uses, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisboa, November 23 – 25, 2017

Deadline for abstract submission: 30 April 2017
Notification of acceptance of abstract: 31 May 2017
Provisional Programme: 30 June  2017
Deadline for registration: 31 August 2017

The topics suggested for proposals for participating in this Conference
are generically the following, although others may be considered if they are deemed pertinent and relevant:

1.    Contemplating the ornament our days: meaning, tendencies and
paths.
2.    Ornament and portuguese decorative arts;
3.    Revivalism, exoticism and ornament
4.    Ornamentalists and engravers: creation, reception and
dissemination;
5.    Ornament and architecture: historiography, theory and present
times;
6.    Mobility and transcontinentality: the migration of forms;
7.    Between the sacred and the profane: appropriations, reinventions
and coexistence;
8.    Intersection, union and dissonance: literature, music and visual
arts.

Abstracts (of no more than 500 words), accompanied by a short bio (250
words), in English or Portuguese, should be sent to the members of the
organizing committee, at iha.ornament2017@gmail.com by April 30, 2016.
Participants will be notified by the end of May, and the conference
program will be published in June. The languages of the conference are
English, Portuguese, Spanish and French.

A selection of papers from the conference will be published in Revista
de História da Arte – Série W, an annual peer-reviewed digital  journal.

For all questions regarding administration and practical matters, as
well as the payment of the conference inscription, please send an email
to  iha.ornament2017@gmail.com

Conference: The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, ca. 1400- 1600 (The Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Student Symposium), The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28 April 2017

ghirlandaio20-20calling20of20the20apostles20detail-201481-20fresco-20sistine20chapel20vatican-31-600x600Conference: The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, ca. 1400 – 1600, (The Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Student Symposium) Courtauld Institute of Art, London, April 28, 2017

In recent years, the analysis of social networks has generated a
fruitful field of scholarly enquiry. Research addressing the dynamics
that govern personal relationships within and without communities of
various kinds has permeated through historical, anthropological, and
sociological studies. These investigations have traced the ways in
which societies structured according to gender, family bonds, and
neighbourhood ties as well as political, professional, and religious
associations regulated social interaction. However, the role of art and
architecture in cultivating these interpersonal relationships has not
been explored comprehensively. Even art historical approaches have
frequently given preference to textual rather than visual evidence in
elucidating these social networks.

This conference seeks to shed light on the ways in which social
networks have been represented visually. Such an approach has great
potential to deepen the discussion surrounding the commission,
production, and reception of art and architecture between 1400 and 1600.

This conference is generously sponsored by the Sackler Research Forum,
Courtauld Institute of Art, the CHASE AHRC Doctoral Training
Partnership Cohort Development Fund, and the Society for Renaissance
Studies.

‘The Art of the Network’ is free and open to the public. Advanced
registration is strongly encouraged:
http://courtauld.ac.uk/event/the-art-of-the-network

PROGRAMME

9.00 – 9.30
Registration

9.30 – 9.45
Welcome: Alexander J. Noelle (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

9.45 – 11.10
Session 1: Materialising Allegiance
Chaired by Suzanne Duff (Brown University)

Ann Adams (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
Perpetual Membership: The Fifteenth-Century Tombs of the Knights of the
Order of the Golden Fleece

Sara Frier (Yale University)
So sah ich als Soldat aus (‘This is how I looked as a soldier’): The
Mercenary-Artists of Renaissance Switzerland

Anna Merlini (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
A Journey through the Labyrinth of Symbols: Retracing a Social Network
across Achille Bocchi’s Symbolicae Quaestiones (1555)

Discussion

11.10 – 11.35
Tea / Coffee Break

11.35 – 13.00
Session 2: Civic Art
Chaired by Imogen Tedbury (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Maria Harvey (The University of Cambridge)
‘ + E?????? ????? ? ???????? ?[??] … ?[????] K??[??????]’: Art and
Community in Fifteenth-Century Salento

Saida Bondini (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
A History of Families: Networks of Private Patronage in Late
Fifteenth-Century Bologna

Maria Matarazzo (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
The Plinian Monuments in Como: Classical Antiquity as Municipal Identity

Discussion

13.00 – 14.00
Lunch Break

14.00 – 15.25
Session 3: Artist(ic) Identity
Chaired by Lydia Goodson (The Warburg Institute)

Elizabeth Bernick (John Hopkins University)
Mapping Cesare da Sesto: A Placeless Style

Wouter Wagemakers (University of Amsterdam)
Visualising Patterns of Patronage in Sixteenth-Century Verona: Michele
Sanmicheli and the Roman Connection

Luca Baroni (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
Urbino to Europe: Federico Barocci’s Artistic and Diplomatic Network as
Visualised in His Paintings

Discussion

15.25 – 15.50
Tea / Coffee Break

15.50 – 17.15
Session 4: Visualising Dynasties
Chaired by Bart van Eekelen (Utrecht University)

Anastazja Grudnicka (University College London)
The (Un)Making of the Habsburg Dynasty: Visual Representations of
Matthias Habsburg in the Dutch Provinces (1577-1581)

Rebekah Helen Lee (University of York)
By the Book: Dynastic and Corporal Network Building in the Arenberg
Family Portrait Album circa 1600

Marina Porri (Universities of Florence, Siena, and Pisa)
Marriage Portraits as Political Networking: The Medici Court at the End
of the Sixteenth Century

Discussion

17.15 – 17.30
Comfort Break

17.30 – 17.45
Closing Remarks: Alexander Röstel (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

17:45 – 18:45
Keynote Address
Prof. John Padgett (University of Chicago)
Networks in Renaissance Florence

18.45 – 20:00
Reception

Vacancy: Lecturer in Art History (pre 1750), University of St Andrews

St AndrewsLecturer in Art History – AC2042AC

University of St Andrews – School of Art History

Start Date: As soon as possible

We wish to appoint a Lecturer (Pre 1750) within the School of Art History. You will be a scholar with a growing international research reputation in art or architectural history or a related field and a commitment to delivering high quality teaching within the field of art history (broadly defined). The successful candidates will be expected to have a range of interests, to be active in research publication that strengthens or complements those in the School and to be capable of teaching the subject to undergraduate and taught postgraduate students from a wide range of backgrounds.

Candidates should hold a PhD in a cognate discipline. Excellent teaching skills and an interest in promoting knowledge exchange are essential. You should also have some familiarity with grant seeking processes in relation to research councils and other sources.

Informal enquiries can be directed to the Head of the School of Art History, Dr Julian Luxford (jml5@st-andrews.ac.uk)

The University of St Andrews is committed to promoting equality of opportunity for all, which is further demonstrated through its working on the Gender and Race Equality Charters and being awarded the Athena SWAN award for women in science, HR Excellence in Research Award and the LGBT Charter; http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/hr/edi/diversityawards/.

We encourage applicants to apply online at www.vacancies.st-andrews.ac.uk/welcome.aspx, however if you are unable to do this, please call +44 (0)1334 462571 for an application pack.

Closing Date: 24 April 2017

Please quote ref: AC2042AC

Further Particulars: AC2042AC FPs.doc

Apply: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AYE601/lecturer-in-art-history-ac2042ac/

Vacancy: Lecturer in Museum and Gallery Studies, University of St Andrews

St AndrewsLecturer in Art History – AC2041AC

University of St Andrews – School of Art History

Start: As soon as possible.

We wish to appoint a Lecturer in Museum and Gallery Studies within the School of Art History. You will be a scholar with a growing international research reputation in museology or a related field and a commitment to delivering high quality teaching within the broad field of museum and gallery studies. The successful candidate will be expected to have a range of interests, to be active in research publication that strengthens or complements those in the School and to be capable of teaching the subject to taught postgraduate students from a wide range of backgrounds.

Candidates should hold a PhD in a cognate discipline. Excellent teaching skills and an interest in promoting knowledge exchange are essential. You should also have some familiarity with grant seeking processes in relation to research councils and other sources.

Informal enquiries can be directed to the Head of the School of Art history, Dr Julian Luxford (jml5@st-andrews.ac.uk)

The University of St Andrews is committed to promoting equality of opportunity for all, which is further demonstrated through its working on the Gender and Race Equality Charters and being awarded the Athena SWAN award for women in science, HR Excellence in Research Award and the LGBT Charter;  http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/hr/edi/diversityawards/.

Closing Date: 24 April 2017

Please quote ref: AC2041AC

Further Particulars: AC2041AC FPs.doc

Apply: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AYD787/lecturer-in-art-history-ac2041ac/

Job: 2 Research Assistant positions, Technische Universität Berlin

43953b1e445c551addb67d5d974a0e6fJob: 2 positions – Research Assistant (Postdoc), Berliner Hochschulen, Technische Universität Berlin (Faculty I, Institute for Art History and Historical Urban Studies/Chair for Modern Art History)
Part-time employment may be possible
Length of contract: 01/09/17 until 31/08/2020
Reference number: I-79/17
Salary grade E13 TV-L
Closing date for applications: 21/04/17

The research cluster “Translocations” at the Institute for Art History
and Historical Urban Studies at the Technische Universität Berlin is
seeking to hire two postdoctoral researchers for its team. The project
is funded through the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz-Prize of the DFG,
awarded to Prof. Dr. Bénédicte Savoy in 2016. The research cluster will
study large-scale displacements of cultural assets from antiquity to
the 20th century such as: art theft and spoliation organized by the
state in times of war and occupation, seizure of cultural goods during
colonialism, displacements as a result of a partition of excavation
discoveries or research expeditions, material diaspora of entire
civilizations expedited by the art trade, and confiscations justified
through ideology, nationalization, or en masse disposal of private
property. The key objective of “Translocations” is to compile a
comprehensive selection of historical findings in order to deliver
orientation and direction for dealing with the challenges posed by this
topic now and in the future. For further information on the research
cluster see www.kuk.tu-berlin.de/menue/translocations/parameter/en.

Working field: The candidate will have the opportunity to pursue his or
her own research interests within the context of an interdisciplinary
team and the overall research goals of the project cluster. This
includes the development and execution of both independent and
team-based studies. The candidate will independently produce work for
academic publication and work within the team on the four foundational
projects of the research cluster (a digital atlas, a virtual library, a
glossary, and an image repertory). The candidate will also be involved
in the organization of academic events and the management of the
project cluster. For further information about the position, please
contact Prof. Dr. Bénédicte Savoy (via Eyke Vonderau:
vonderau@tuberlin.de).

Requirements: Candidates must have completed a university degree
(Diplom, Master, or equivalent) as well as a completed doctoral degree
(or expectedly completed until 01/09/17), in a discipline related to
the project (art history, history, archeology, area studies,
literature, cultural studies, or ethnology; depending on research
focus, candidates from the legal sciences, sociology, or other related
fields will also be considered); Research interest and academic
experience related to the topic of the project cluster; Historical
knowledge of at least one of the relevant regions and periods; Very
good English and German language skills. Proficiency in at least one
other language relevant to the project is a plus (e.g. Arabic, Chinese,
Greek, Russian, Turkish). Candidates should preferably have experience
and be comfortable working in an interdisciplinary team, and possess
excellent collaboration and communication skills.

The application materials (including an outline of 250-300 words for a
case study in the project, a cover letter, the CV, and copies of
certificates) should be sent in a single PDF file to
annick.trellu@tu-berlin.de. Please mark all application materials with
the reference number above. Applications by email are strongly
preferred; however, applications may also be sent per mail to
Technische Universität Berlin – Der Präsident -, Fakultät I, Institut
für Kunstwissenschaft und Historische Urbanistik, FG Kunstgeschichte,
Frau Prof. Dr. Savoy, Sekr. A 56, Straße des 17. Juni 150/152, 10623
Berlin.

To ensure equal opportunities between women and men, applications by
women with the required qualifications are explicitly desired.
Qualified individuals with disabilities will be favored.

Please send copies only. Original documents will not be returned.

The vacancy is also available on the internet at
https://stellenticket.de/33306/?lang=en

CFP: Final Conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as Places of Transformation” Bamberg, January 11 – 14, 2018

dp300044CFP: Final Conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as Places of Transformation” Bamberg, January 11 – 14, 2018
Deadline: 15 June 2017.

The medieval church portal is in many respects a place of
transformation. At the threshold of a church, various spheres converge
and meet: secular – ecclesiastic, corporeal – spiritual, earthly –
divine. Iconography and formal design offer ample evidence of this
unique situation. At the same time, church portals themselves are
objects of change: their appearances are constantly shifting due to
modification, chromatic reworking and restorative endeavours. After
all, modernism declared portals works of art, and this change of status
was accompanied by a further metamorphosis: The medieval portal became
an aesthetic object and thereby an exhibit with alternative forms of
presentation.

The international final conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as
Places of Transformation” (University of Bamberg, Chair in Medieval Art
History, Professorship in Building Preservation Sciences, Professorship
in Building History and Building Archaeology) will provide various
conference sections focusing on central issues of continuity and change
as they pertain to medieval portals:

Section 1: Conceptual design of medieval portals. The interplay of
architecture and sculpture (building design, design methods,
proportions, room arrangement)

Section 2: Construction of medieval portals. Structural analyses for
the documentation of transformation processes (footing, interlinking of
constructive units, masonry technique, types of stone, structural
analysis, construction process)

Section 3: Iconographic programmes. The portal as a place of spiritual
transformation in the Middle Ages (Iconography, text and image,
eschatological themes, cosmos/cardinal directions)

Section 4: Medieval bronze and wood doors (doors, hinges, mountings,
closing and latching mechanisms)

Section 5: Changing portals. Secular and liturgical use (medieval
procession liturgies, user hierarchy, liturgical dramas and legal acts)

Section 6: Adaptations, alterations and modifications of portals
(restoration layers, renovation measures, surface treatments,
maintenance, supplementation using copies, copying techniques in stone,
plaster und synthetic materials)

Section 7: The portal as a work of art (museum displays, illuminations,
repurposing, virtual presentations and representations)

The conference languages are German, English and French. Please send
your abstract (max. 1500-2000 characters, including spaces) to
Katja.Schroeck@uni-bamberg.de no later than 15 June 2017.