Tag Archives: Eastern Mediterranean

CFP: ‘Hurt and healing: people, texts, and material culture in the Eastern Mediterranean’ – 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies (University of Birmingham) (deadline 21st April 2018)

Hurt and Healing: people, texts, and material culture in the Eastern Mediterranean’.

The 19th Annual CBOMGS Postgraduate Colloquium

2nd June 2018

The Committee is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK.

The concepts of hurt, trauma and healing cross between the different disciplines that deal with Eastern Mediterranean. The colloquium aims to explore transformations and multifarious dimensions of the notions of trauma and wreckage, and their opposition, healing, from the Late Antiquity to the Present.

Whilst serving as antitheses to one another they are also complementary. After destruction and breakage, comes the need for repair. However, when a broken textile’s ripped edges are joined again, the visible seam signifies the damage that has happened. Trauma and healing are key concepts in medicine, psychology, and sociology. However, political ideology has constantly used them in order to justify the rising and the existence of authoritarian regimes. In the past, medicine, saints, and magic offered different ways for healing the body and the soul. The current aim of restoration practices is to heal remnants of cultural heritage after damage and to prevent damage with appropriate conservation strategies.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Healing power of saints and healing people in society;
  • Medicine and magic;
  • Cultural heritage and material culture: restoration and preservation practices, as well as preventive actions for the preservation;
  • The individual aspects of trauma, especially in relation to the politics of gender, sexuality, class, race, and identity (sexual abuse, domestic violence, shame and fear, death and mourning or melancholia);
  • Collective experiences of trauma (war, genocide, terrorism, victims and perpetrators, practices of memory and oblivion);
  • Migration from the Late Antiquity to the current migration crisis and harrowing events in refugee camps;
  • Public health and medical, therapeutic approaches to illnesses and trauma;
  • Texts and images related to medical practices

Papers of approximately 20 minutes related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than Saturday 21st April 2018 to 2018cbomgscolloquium@gmail.com.  Applicants will be notified of selection by 28th April 2018.

 

For more information click here: https://cbomgs2018colloquium.wordpress.com/

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Conference: Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Art, Architecture and Material Culture (13th-16th c.), Nafplion, Wednesday 19th-Sunday 23rd April 2017

751308413_origConference: Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Art, Architecture and Material Culture (13th-16th c.), Nafplion, Wednesday 19th-Sunday 23rd April 2017
Free, booking required: http://mendicants.weebly.com/registration.html
Conference website: http://mendicants.weebly.com/

Programme:
Wednesday, 19 April 2017

9:30 – 10:00      Registration

10:00 – 10:30    Welcoming Addresses

10:30 – 11:00    Ioanna Christoforaki (Academy of Athens)
Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Reviewing the Evidence

11:00 – 11:30     Coffee Break

One Step Beyond: The Mendicants in Constantinople and Dalmatia

11:30 – 11:50     Şebnem Dönbekci (Koç University)
Revisiting the Vita Cycle of Saint Francis in Constantinople: Power and Ideology in the Medieval Mediterranean

11:50 – 12:10      Silvia Pedone (Sapienza Università di Roma) and Nicholas Melvani (Koç University)
Constantinople and the Dominicans: History, Topography, and Monuments on Both Shores of the Golden Horn

12:10 – 12:30     Rafał Quirini-Popławski (Jagiellonian University of Kraków)
Mendicant Art and Architecture in the Black Sea: Pera and Caffa

12:30 – 12:50    Discussion

12:50 – 15:00    Lunch

15:00 – 15:20     Josip Belamarić (Cvito Fisković Centre and University of Split)
Franciscans and Art on the Croatian Coast in the Thirteenth Century

15:20 – 15:40    Zoraida Demori Staničić (Croatian Conservation Institute)
Franciscan Convents in Hvar: Between Cult and Politics

15:40 – 16:00    Nina Kudiš (University of Rijeka)
Venetian Seicento Painters in Franciscan and Dominican Churches of Dalmatia: Some Important Examples

16:00 – 16:20    Ivana Prijatelj Pavičić (University of Split),
Anti-Ottoman Narratives on the Altarpieces of Our Lady of the Rosary and Our Lady of Carmel in the Dominican and Franciscan Churches of Dalmatia

16:20 – 16:40    Discussion

16:40 – 17:00    Coffee Break

17:00 – 17:45     Keynote Lecture
Sophia Kalopissi-Verti (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)
Byzantium ‘Challenged’  after 1204:  Reactions, Responses and their Reflections in Iconography

17:45 – 18:00    Discussion

19:30 – 21:30    Cocktail reception at Nafplia Palace Hotel (speakers only)

Thursday, 20 April 2017

Franciscans and Dominicans in Latin Romania

9:00 – 9:20      Michalis Olympios (University of Cyprus)
Eloquent Marginalia: Figural Sculpture at the Dominican Church in Negroponte (Chalkis, Euboea)

9:20 – 9:40       Demetris Athanasoulis (Ephorate of Antiquities of the Cyclades)
The Church of Saint Francis in Glarentza (Clarence)

9:40 – 10:00    Eleni Barmparitsa (Ephorate of Antiquities of Messenia)
Settlement and Activities of the Mendicant Orders in the Peloponnese during the Late Middle Ages

10:00 – 10:20   Discussion

10:20 – 10:50   Coffee Break

10:50 – 11:10      Panayota Volti (Université Paris-Nanterre)
Some Decorative Elements of the Church of the Virgin in Merbaka, Argolis: A Visual Exegesis of  Dominican History and Spirituality?

11:10 – 11:30       Guy D. R. Sanders (American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Corinth Excavations)
The Archaeology of the Poor at Corinth in the Time of William of Moerbeke OP, Translator of Aristotle, Archimedes, Hero and Galen and Dominican Bishop of Corinth (1278-85)

11:30 – 11:50      Vicky Foskolou (University of Crete)
Reflections of Mendicant Religiosity in the Monumental Painting of the Latin Southern Greek Mainland and the Islands (13th-15th c.)

11:50 – 12:10     Discussion

12:10 – 12:30     Daphne Chronaki (Ephorate of Antiquities of Lassithi)
Παρατηρήσεις στη χωροθέτηση και στις χαράξεις ναών των επαιτικών ταγμάτων στην Κρήτη
[Observations on the planning and proportions of mendicant churches on Crete]

12:30 – 12:50    Eleni Kanaki, Daphne Chronaki and Chara Bilmezi (Ephorates of Antiquities of Herakleion and Lassithi)
Ο ναός του Αγίου Πέτρου των Δομηνικανών στο Ηράκλειο
[The church of Saint Peter of the Dominicans in Herakleion]

12:50 – 13:10     Periandros Epitropakis (Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports)
Το χρονικό της ανασκαφής της μονής του Αγίου Φραγκίσκου Ηρακλείου μέσα από τον τύπο της εποχής
[The chronicle of the excavation of Saint Francis monastery in Heraklion through contemporary press]

13:10 – 13:30     Discussion

13:30 – 15:00   Lunch break

15:00 – 15:20   Olga Gratziou (University of Crete)
The Friars and their Impact on Crete: Material and Visual Evidence

15:20 – 15:40    Kostas Giapitsoglou (Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymnon)
Tο καθολικό της μονής της Αγίας Μαρίας Μαγδαληνής των Δομηνικανών στο Ρέθυμνο
[The katholikon of the monastery of Saint Mary Madgalene of the Dominicans in Rehtymnon]

15:40 – 16:00   Maria Borboudaki (Byzantine and Christian Museum of Athens)
Evidence of Dominican Presence in the Cretan Countryside: A Fresco of Saint Peter of Verona in the Church of Saint George in the Village of Apostoloi Pediados (Herakleion)

16:00 – 16:20   Discussion

16:20 – 16:40    Coffee Break

16:40 – 17:00   Maria Constantoudaki-Kitromilides (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)
Saint Francis and Private Devotion in Venetian Crete: Visual and Archival Evidence

17:10 – 17:30      Chryssa Ranoutsaki (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)
Saint Francis and Saint Catherine: Two Eminent Model Saints of the Mendicant Orders in Medieval Crete

17:30 – 17:50    Nickiphoros Tsougarakis (Edge Hill University)
Re-examining the Franciscan Library of Candia

18:10 – 18:30     Discussion

18:30 – 19:15    Keynote Lecture
Donal Cooper (University of Cambridge)
The Mendicant Orders as Patrons of Art and Architecture in Venetian Herakleion

19:15 – 19:30   Discussion

20:00 – 22:00   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Friday, 21 April 2017

Mendicant Presence in the Crusader Levant

9:30 – 9:50     Margit Mersch (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)
The Development of Local and Trans-Regional Mendicant Architecture: A Comparative Glance on Franciscan Churches on Cyprus and Crete (13th-14th c.)

9:50 – 10:10     Thomas Kaffenberger (Université de Fribourg)
Saint Clare or Saint Dominic? New Observations on the ‘Hagia Fotou’ Ruins in Famagusta

10:10 – 10:30   Maria Paschali (Independent Scholar)
An Image with Our Lady of Carmel in Famagusta and the Interplay of Sanctity, Piety and Power

10:30 – 10:50  Discussion

10:50 – 11:10    Coffee break

11:10 – 11:30      Rehav Rubin and Milka Levy-Rubin (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
How did the Franciscans Choose to Portray Jerusalem?

11:30 – 11:50     Fanny Vitto (Israel Antiquities Authority)
The Cradle of the Carmelites in the Holy Land before Becoming a Mendicant Order

11:50 – 12:10     Barbara Drake Boehm and Melanie Holcomb (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Facing the Forbidden:  Felix Fabri in Medieval Jerusalem

12:10 – 12:30    Discussion

12:30 – 14:30   Lunch break

14:30 – 14:50   Jaroslav Folda (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Artistic Commissions related to the Mendicant Orders in the Thirteenth Century Crusader Levant

14:50 – 15:10     Lucy-Anne Hunt (Manchester Metropolitan University)
Centres and Peripheries: A Perspective on Mendicants and Christian Art in the Crusader States and Muslim Egypt

15:10 – 15:30     Prodromos Papanikolaou (King’s College London)
Artistic Traces of  Franciscan Piety in Hospitaller Rhodes: The Marble Icons of the Virgin and St. John the Evangelist

15:30 – 15:50   Discussion

15:50 – 16:10    Coffee Break

16:10 – 16:30    Amy Neff (University of Tennessee)
Sinai in the Franciscan Visual Imagination

16:30 – 16:50   Manuel Castiñeiras (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)
From Catalonia to Sinai: A Two-Way Journey. Revisiting the Legend of King Abgar in the Saint Francis Altarpiece of Santa Clara in Vic (1414-1415)

16:50 – 17:10    Discussion

17:10 – 17:30    Coffee break

17:30 – 18:15    Keynote Lecture
Michele Bacci (Université de Fribourg)
The Franciscans as Promoters of New Holy Sites

18:15 – 18:30    Discussion

19:30 – 21:30   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Mendicant Art between East and West
9:30 – 9:50      Jean-Pierre Caillet (Université Paris-Nanterre) and Fabienne Joubert (Université Paris-Sorbonne)
Byzantine Sources of the Crucifixion in Italy: Revisiting the Role of the Mendicants

9:50 – 10:10    Emily Guerry (University of Kent)
A Path Prepared for Them by the Lord: Saint Louis, Dominican Diplomacy, and the Odyssey of Jacques and André of Longjumeau

10:10 – 10:30   Krisztina Ilko (University of Cambridge)
Augustinian Friars in the East

10:30 – 10:50  Discussion

10:50 – 11:10    Coffee Break

11:10 – 11:30      Helen Evans (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
The Franciscans among the Armenians

11:30 – 11:50     Ioanna Rapti (École Pratique des Hautes Études)
Armenian Αrt and the Μendicant Οrders in the East: Εncounters and Ιnteractions

11:50 – 12:10     Lauren Arnold (University of San Francisco)
Armenian Carpets in Early Renaissance Paintings: The Mendicant Orders and their Role in Facilitating a Migration of Eastern Christians to Italy (1250-1500)

12:10 – 12:30    Discussion

12:30 – 14:30   Lunch break

Round Table Discussion
14:30 – 17:00
Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies
(conference speakers only)

Welcoming Address: Dr Christos Giannopoulos (Center for Hellenic Studies)

Coordinator:  Ioanna Christoforaki (Academy of Athens)

Louise Bourdua (University of Warwick)
Anne Derbes (Hood College)
Julian Gardner (University of Warwick)
Maria Georgopoulou (The Gennadeios Library, ASCSA)
Maria Vassilaki (University of Thessaly)
Gerhard Wolf (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max Planck Institut)

17:00 – 17:30   Afternoon Coffee

19:30 – 21:30   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Sunday, 23 April 2017
(conference speakers only)

Excursion to medieval monuments in the Argolis (Agia Moni in Nafplion and Church of the Virgin in Merbaka) in the morning. Visit to the new Byzantine Museum in Argos, followed by a guided tour of the Corinth excavations by Guy Sanders in the afternoon.

CFP: CEMS International Graduate Conference (Budapest, 1-3 Jun 17)

mediterraneanBudapest, Central European University, June 1 – 03, 2017
Deadline: Jan 31, 2017

The Center for Eastern Mediterranean Studies (CEMS) at Central European
University and its junior members are proud to announce the forthcoming
Fifth International Graduate Conference on Building, Bending, and
Breaking Boundaries in the Eastern Mediterranean World.

 

This three-day conference invites graduate students of Late Antique, Islamic, Jewish,
Byzantine, Medieval, Ottoman studies, and related disciplines, to present their research on the manifold and complex processes of constructing, negotiating, transgressing, and subverting social, political, cultural, or confessional boundaries in the eastern Mediterranean from Antiquity to the Early Modern period.

Conference Description

What is a border? What are the sites and strategies of
boundary-construction and who are its agents? Boundaries shape and
forge categories by enforcement and reinforcement of power ingrained
within a built environment, conceptual or physical. Thus, they do not
necessarily indicate territorial margins, but can also embrace
theoretical, temporal, and metaphorical borders. They can be natural or
artificial, sharp or blurry; they can be understood in positive and/or
negative terms as means of protection or as instruments of exclusion;
and they can mark conceptual territories, such as “the human,” “the
holy,” “the family,” or “the natural world.” Triggered by new waves of
immigration, the meaningfulness of state borders and the necessity of
their control have been subject to debate, alongside questions
concerning the boundaries surrounding identities, cultures or
religions. Moving beyond the border of nation-states and the “clash of
civilizations” paradigm, the main objective of this conference is to
explore the historically contingent, fluid, and dynamic nature of
borders by shedding light on the intricate mechanisms through which
boundaries were erected, maintained, crossed, and transgressed
throughout the eastern Mediterranean world.

Possible paper topics might include, but are not limited to:

Border ontologies and epistemologies
Negotiating, contesting, and appropriating spaces – sites of cultural,
religious, social, political, economic, artistic encounters,
transformations, and exchange
The dynamics of borders and identities – the role of different sensory
mechanisms in (re)articulating communal boundaries and identities,
multiple identities and cultural mobility
Practices of representation – multisensory engagement with various
aspects of daily life, the anthropology of smells and sounds, sumptuary
restrictions on food
Bordering the body – the politicization of bodily images and the
genderization of conflicts
Geopolitics, power practices, sovereignty
Politics of translation as means of enforcement, representation, and/or
appropriation
Please submit by January 31, 2017 a short paper proposal (no more than
250 words, together with a brief biography and contact information) to
the following address: cemsconference@ceu.edu

Keynote Speakers

Verena Krebs (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

David Thomas (University of Birmingham)

Greg Woolf (Institute of Classical Studies, London)

Accommodation and Travel Grants

All participants will be offered accommodation for the full duration of
the conference (3 nights) at the CEU Residence Center. In order to
encourage the participation of individuals with limited institutional
support a small number of partial travel grants will be available to
cover travel expenses. Those who wish to be considered for the grant
should include an additional justification alongside their paper
proposals. Please note that there is no conference fee. For further
information, do not hesitate to contact the organizers at
cemsconference@ceu.edu .

ICMA: GRADUATE STUDENT TRAVEL GRANTS

OrvietoThe ICMA has initiated a new form of grant for graduate students in the early stages of their dissertation research.  Three grants will be awarded this year, at $3,000 each, to enable a student to travel to Europe (including the Eastern Mediterranean) to visit the monuments or museum objects or manuscripts on which the dissertation will be based.  The grant is designed to cover one month of travel. The ICMA will contact institutions and/or individuals in the area to be visited; these will help the student gain access to the relevant material and aid in other practical matters.

 

The grant is designed primarily for the student who has finished the preliminary exams, and is in the process of formulating a dissertation topic.  Students who have already submitted a proposal, but are still very early on in the process of their research, may also apply.

All applicants must be ICMA members. (click here to join/renew)

Applicants must submit:

  1.  Outline of the thesis proposal in 800 words or less.
  2.  Detailed outline of exactly what the student would like to see on his/her travels, and how this relates to the proposed thesis topic.

3.    Proposed budget (airfare, lodging, other travel, per diem).

  1. Letter from the thesis advisor, clarifying where the student stands in his/her graduate career, and explaining the relevance of the trip to the thesis.

Upon return, the student will be required to submit a letter and financial report to the ICMA and a narrative to the student section of the newsletter.

Applications are due by 1 March 2016. The ICMA will announce the winners of the three grants by 13 May 2016.

Please submit materials as PDF attachments to Ryan Frisinger at awards@medievalart.org with “Student Travel Grant” in the subject line.