Tag Archives: Symposium

Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

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Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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Deadline Extended: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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CFP: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St Louis University, St Louis, Mo., USA, 18th-20th June, 2018

smrs_logo_emailCall for Papers: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St Louis University, St Louis, Mo., USA, 18th-20th June, 2018
Deadline: December 31

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies provides a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars in all disciplines to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation on all topics and in all disciplines of the medieval and early modern worlds.

The Symposium is held on the beautiful midtown campus of Saint Louis University, hosted by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. On-campus housing options include affordable, air-conditioned dormitory rooms and a luxurious boutique hotel.

The plenary speakers for this year will be Geoffrey Parker, of The Ohio State University, and Carole Hillenbrand, of the University of St Andrews.

For more information, click here.

CFP: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 30 October 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 30 October 2017.

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CFP: Schaffen und Nachahmen (Tuebingen, 17-20 Mar 19)

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Das 18. Symposium findet unter dem Titel „Schaffen und Nachahmen. Kreative Prozesse im Mittelalter“ vom 17.-20. März 2019 in Tübingen statt.

In der Gegenwart wird das Verhältnis von Schaffen und Nachahmen und deren Bedeutung für kreative Prozesse neu ausgehandelt: Die Postmoderne hat das Subjekt dezentriert und intensiv über den Tod des Autors diskutiert. Die Möglichkeiten, die erst die Informationstechnologie und das Internet eröffnet haben, generieren neuartige Debatten über die Grenzen von Urheberschaft und das Verhältnis von Original und Kopie, Zitat und Plagiat. I m Internet ist ein Urheberrecht kaum zu behaupten, „Copy and Paste“ sind längst Praxis. Hier werden Seiten gespiegelt, Aussagen, Bilder und Filme anderer Seiten kompiliert, Zitate nicht mehr angeführt, sondern verlinkt. Symptome dieses Wandels kreativer Prozesse sind etwa die Diskussionen über Helene Hegemanns Roman „Axolotl Roadkill“ (2010) und das Kompilieren als künstlerisches Verfahren oder
auch die – durchaus politischen – Debatten über die Grenzen des Plagiats in der Wissenschaft.
Für das Tübinger Symposium möchten wir diese aktuellen  Veränderungen zum Anlass nehmen, nach dem Spannungsverhältnis von Schaffen und Nachahmen im Mittelalter zu fragen und uns so der Frage der Kreativität im Mittelalter zuzuwenden. Wir gehen davon aus, dass die Manuskript-und Objektkulturen dieser Epoche Vorstellungen, Diskurse und Praktiken hervorgebracht haben, die es in dieser Hinsicht zu analysieren lohnt.
Zu diskutieren wäre auch, inwiefern die historischen Phänomene dabei gegenwärtigen Entwicklungen nicht sogar näher stehen als jenen der westlichen Moderne mit ihren spezifischen Konzepten von Autorschaft, Urheberrecht, Originalität, Plagiat. Damit ist selbstverständlich keine Rückkehr ins Mittelalter behauptet – sehr wohl aber die Frage
aufgeworfen, ob sich das Verhältnis unserer eigenen Kultur zu den Kulturen des  Mittelalters noch ohne weiteres über dieselben dichotomischen Modelle der Alterität von Mittelalter und Moderne beschreiben lässt, wie es spätestens seit den 1980er Jahren vielfach üblich gewesen ist.

Der Spannung von Schaffen und Nachahmen bei kreativen Prozessen in dem weiten Zeitraum vom 6. bis zum 15. Jahrhundert wollen wir interdisziplinär besonders in drei Feldern nachgehen: Original – Kopie, Urbild – Abbild, Entkontextualisierung – Neukontextualisierung.

1. Original – Kopie: Die Unterscheidung von Original und Kopie ist seit jeher Teil historischer Kritik und deshalb in verschiedensten mediävistischen Fächern – von der Kunstgeschichte bis zu historischen Grundwissenschaften wie der Diplomatik – von zentraler Bedeutung. Die Übergänge zwischen Original, Kopie, Rezension, réécriture,
Überarbeitung und neuem Text waren dabei aber in den Manuskriptkulturen des Mittelalters oft genug fließend. Daraus entspringen Phänomene, die aktuell nicht zuletzt für Editionen mittelalterlicher Texte diskutiert werden: Interessanterweise eröffnen gerade das Internet und elektronische Editionen Möglichkeiten, ein Charakteristikum
mittelalterlicher Überlieferung und Textualität neu und präziser abzubilden und wissenschaftlich zu erschließen. Zugleich hat die Forschung aber auch herausgestellt, dass das Verständnis der beiden Kategorien „Original“ und „Kopie“ wie auch deren
Bewertung kulturell bedingt und historisch wandelbar sind: Zeitgenossen des Mittelalters konnten beispielsweise Kopien der Grabeskirche in Jerusalem auch dort noch sehen, wo ein heutiger Betrachter kaum eine Gemeinsamkeit zu erkennen vermag. Originalität konnte gerade in der neuen Zusammenstellung und Ordnung alten Wissens gesehen werden – oder sogar als problematisch eingestuft werden.

2. Urbild – Abbild: Die Zuordnung von Urbild und Abbild gehört zu den grundlegenden Konzepten neuplatonischer Philosophie und Theologie – in ihr drückt sich die Differenz wie die Zusammengehörigkeit zugleich aus; Abbildhaftigkeit ist so auch ein Partizipationsvorgang, in dem die Kreativität des Menschen als Nachahmung des göttlichen Schaffens verstanden wird. Ihre Bedeutung reicht aber weit über diese Bereiche hinaus: Übersetzungsprozesse etwa der hochmittelalterlichen Epik wissen gleichfalls um das komplexe Verhältnis zwischen einem nachahmenden Abbild und einem vorgeprägten Urbild. Kunststile entwickeln sich vielfach durch Nachahmung, so wie auch ganze Stadtensemble – Rom oder Jerusalem – in anderen architektonischen Kontexten abgebildet werden und Anteil an ihrem Urbild geben. Theologisch wird das Verhältnis grundlegend in der Frage der Gottebenbildlichkeit behandelt, aber auch im Blick auf liturgische Fragen wie im byzantinischen Bilderstreit oder im  Eucharistiestreit im Frankenreich des 9. Jahrhunderts. Literarisch und rechtshistorisch ist zu fragen, in welcher Weise in früher einfach als „Fälschungen“ eingeordneten Nachahmungsvorgängen – etwa bei Pseudo-Isidor, Benedictus Levita oder Pseudo-Dionysios – im Abbildcharakter auch die Partizipation am Urbild mitschwingt.

3. Entkontextualisierung – Neukontextualisierung: Die beschriebenen Prozesse betreffen nicht nur Objekte als Ganze, sondern auch ihre Teile: Vielfach werden Einzelstücke aus ihrem originalen Kontext in einen neuen Kontext gesetzt. Zitate gewinnen einen neuen Charakter, wenn sie in einen anderen literarischen Kontext gesetzt werden, Spolien lassen das Original noch erkennen und dienen doch einem ganz andern Zusammenhang und werden mit neuer Bedeutung aufgeladen. Eklektizismus bedient sich mannigfacher Stücke aus anderen Zusammenhängen, um sie zu einem neuen Ganzen zusammenzusetzen. Durch Vorgänge der Zitation oder des Reframings erfolgt eine mannigfache Umsemantisierung. So entstehen vielfach Werke, die leicht als nachahmende Kompilation abgewertet werden können, in denen aber die Persistenz des Vorgegebenen und die schöpferische Kraft der Neukonstitution eine anregende Spannung eingehen: Vorgegebenes wird bewahrt, neu zum Sprechen gebracht oder kreativ weiterentwickelt.

Das Thema eignet sich für mediävistische Fachvorträge der im Verband vertretenen Disziplinen. Es bietet darüber hinaus die Möglichkeit, eine Podiumsdiskussion über Urheberschaft und Plagiat im Zeitalter des Internets zu veranstalten, in der in produktiver Weise mediävistische Forschung mit gegenwärtigen Debatten vernetzt werden könnte. Außerdem ist das Thema geeignet, Schülersektionen zu veranstalten – und auf diese Weise die Epoche des Mittelalters noch weiter in der schulischen Praxis sichtbar zu machen.

Zu den genannten drei Themenfeldern werden Vorschläge für Sektions-oder Einzelbeiträge sowie interaktive workshops erbeten:
Dauer einer Sektion: in der Regel 1½ Stunden mit drei Vorträgen (inkl. Diskussion).
Vortragsdauer: nicht länger als 20 Minuten.
Bei von Teams selbstständig gestalteten Sektionen oder interaktiven workshops mit drei oder vier Vorträgen ist darauf zu achten, dass die Rede- und Diskussionszeit die vorgegebene Sektionsdauer von 1½ Stunden nicht überschreiten. Ferner sollen – im Sinne der interdisziplinären Ausrichtung des Verbandes – bei drei Vortragenden mindestens zwei, bei vier Vortragenden mindestens drei verschiedene Fächer beteiligt sein.

Die Veranstalter sind Ihnen dankbar, wenn die Exposés folgendem Aufbau folgen:
– Nummer des Themenblocks (s. o., 1-3)
– Ihre Adresse (inkl. E-mail); bei Sektionsvorschlägen die Adresse des/der Verantwortlichen
– Exposé von maximal 7000 Zeichen (Sektionsvorschlag) bzw. 1500 Zeichen (Einzelvorschlag, workshop)

Die Veranstalter bitten darum, die zu Sektionen gehörigen Exposés nicht auch einzeln einzureichen. Es wird ausdrücklich begrüßt, wenn in den Teams auch Nachwuchswissenschaftler/innen zu Wort kommen.

Bitte richten Sie Ihre Vorschläge, vorzugsweise per E-Mail mit Attachment, bis zum 28. Februar 2018 an folgende Adresse:

E-Mail: sekretariat.leppin@ev-theologie.uni-tuebingen.de

Prof. Dr. Volker Leppin
Evg.-Theol. Fakultät
Institut für Spätmittelalter und Reformation
Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
Liebermeisterstr. 12
D-72070 Tübingen

http://www.mediaevistenverband.de/symposium/17-symposium-2019/

Conf: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era, University of Birmingham, 24-25 February 2017

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Conference: 
Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era
University of Birmingham
24-25 February 2017

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

24 Feb 2017 – 1st day
14.00-14.10 – Opening remarks: prof Leslie Brubaker, University of Birmingham
14.10-15.00 First Keynote lecture and discussion: Dr Cecily Hilsdale, McGill University, Title TBC
15.00-16.00 First panel – Chair Dr Ruth Macrides, University of Birmingham
Ivana Jevtic: Late Byzantine Painting Reconsidered: Art in Decline or Art in the Age of Decline?
Andrew Griebeler: The Greek Botanical Albums in Late Byzantine and Early Ottoman Constantinople
Maria Alessia Rossi: Political ruin or spiritual renewal? Early Palaiologan art in context
16.00-16.20 Discussion
16.30-16.50 Coffee break
17.00-17.50 Second Keynote lecture and discussion: prof Niels Gaul, University of Edinburgh: Palaiologan Byzantium(s): East Rome’s Final Two Centuries in Recent Research
18.00-19.00 Reception

25 Feb 2017 – 2nd day
9.00-9.50 Opening keynote lecture and discussion: Dr Angeliki Lymberopoulou, Open University, Palaiologan art from regional Crete: artistic decline or social progress?
10.00 -10.40 Second panel – Chair Dr Daniel Reynolds, University of Birmingham Anđela Gavrilović: The Stylistic Features of the Frescoes of the Church of the Mother of God Hodegetria in the Patriarchate of Peć (c. 1335-1337)
Ludovic Bender: Mistra and its countryside: The transformation of the late Byzantine religious landscape of Laconia
10.40-11.00 Discussion
11.00-11.20 Coffee break
11.30-12.30 Third Panel – Chair Dr Francesca Dell’Acqua, University of Birmingham Andrea Mattiello: Who’s that man? The perception of Byzantium in 15th century Italy
Tatiana Bardashova: Palaiologan Influence on the Visual Representation of the Grand Komnenoi in the Empire of Trebizond (1204-1461)
Lilyana Yordanova: The Issues of Visual Narrative, Literary Patronage and Display of Virtues of a Bulgarian Tsar in the Fourteenth century
12.30-12.50 Discussion
13.00-14.00 Lunch break

Workshop
14.10-14.50 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
14.50-15.30 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
15.40-16.00 Coffee break
16.10-16.50 Two 10-mins presentations by MA students and 20-mins discussion
16.50-17.00 Closing remarks: Andrea Mattiello/Maria Alessia Rossi

The programme, further information and details of how to book can be found at:

and
http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/bomgs/events/2017/reconsidering-palaiologan-arts.aspx