Tag Archives: Medieval Patronage

CFP: Papal Patronage and Interventions at RSA Conference 2019

Papal Patronage and Interventions | Renaissance Society of America Annual Conference 2019 | Toronto, CA | 17-19 March, 2019

One of the several panels at next year’s RSA Annual Conference will be Papal Patronage and Interventions. From the Schism to the Counter-Reformation, the pope and his court are among the greatest patrons of early modern Europe, seizing upon art and literature as harbingers of Christian order, power, and prosperity. These commissions include a dazzling array of objects, ensembles, and spaces, ranging from miniature vessels to grand palaces – even the renovation of Saint Peter’s itself. We invite proposals for papers that examine the role of artistic and architectural activities in shaping the image, identity, and office of the papacy in the Renaissance. What were the visual, ecclesiastical, and political motors that inspired patterns of patronage? In what ways did these currents stimulate artistic response? What were the stakes of individual objects and monuments commissioned in this heady atmosphere? We conceive of subjects broadly, spanning the European continent from the thirteenth through the sixteenth century.

This panel is sponsored by the Association of Textual Scholarship in Art History.

Please send a short C.V. (no more than one page), a 150-word abstract, and a list of keywords to Tracy Cosgriff (tcosgriff@wooster.edu) and Sara Nair James (sjames@marybaldwin.edu) by July 15.

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CFP: Image & Meaning in Medieval Manuscripts: Sessions in Honor of Adelaide Bennett Hagens (Two Sessions, International Congress on Medieval Studies)

Call for Papers: Image & Meaning in Medieval Manuscripts: Sessions in Honor of Adelaide Bennett Hagens

Session I: Text-Image Dynamics in Medieval Manuscripts

Session II: Signs of Patronage in Medieval Manuscripts

International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 11-14 May 2017

Organized by Judith Golden and Jessica Savage, Index of Christian Art, Princeton University

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Session I: Text-Image Dynamics in Medieval Manuscripts

This session invites papers that examine the interaction between words and images in medieval manuscripts as they shape the reader-viewer’s experience of the book. How do texts and images interact on the page? How did medieval readers respond to the varied discourses between images and texts? This session endeavors to open up new perspectives in describing, analyzing, and contextualizing manuscript illumination. Speakers may address the topic of visual rhetoric and how images communicate meaning with accompanying text, image-text composition, and the recovery of the reader’s experience through text and iconography. Also of interest is the role of images and their intrinsic or peripheral textual elements (including rubrics, captions, mottos, names, initials, labels, titles, instructions, votives, quotations, speech scrolls, pseudo-inscriptions and other types of inscriptions), as well as that of formal text or paratextual elements, in elucidating meaning and engaging the viewer. Speakers may consider case studies of particular manuscripts or present analyses addressing broad iconographic trends.

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Session II: Signs of Patronage in Medieval Manuscripts

This session invites papers that examine the many varied “visual signatures” of manuscript patrons, including the dress, gestures, posture, and attributes of donor figures; heraldry and personalized inscriptions; marginal notes, colophons, dedications, and other signs of ownership and use. Building on scholarship presented in the 2013 Index conference Patronage: Power and Agency in Medieval Art, this session seeks papers that will investigate the dynamic system of patronage centered on the interaction of owners with their books (whether as creator, patron, commissioner, or reader-viewer). Speakers may also investigate the importance of gender and social roles in book production, use, and readership or the role of patron as instigator in the process of book creation, from payment to design.

 

Adelaide Bennett Hagens is retiring from the Index of Christian Art at Princeton University after fifty years of dedicated research and scholarship. She studied under Robert Branner at Columbia University and joined the Index during the directorship of Rosalie Green. Adelaide has studied medieval art in a variety of media, but her passion at the Index and in her personal research has always been manuscript illumination, particularly of the Gothic period. Her publications include “Some Perspectives on the Origins of Books of Hours in France in the Thirteenth Century,” in Books of Hours Reconsidered, edited by Sandra Hindman and James H. Marrow (2013); “Making Literate Lay Women Visible: Text and Image in French and Flemish Books of Hours, 1220–1320,” in Thresholds of Medieval Visual Culture: Liminal Spaces, edited by Elina Gertsman and Jill Stevenson (2012); and “The Windmill Psalter: The Historiated Letter E of Psalm One,” Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 43 (1980). In two sessions, we celebrate Adelaide’s accomplishments and recognize her contributions to the Index of Christian Art and to the wider medieval and academic community.

Inspired by Adelaide’s continued interest in new research, we would particularly welcome submissions from emerging scholars in manuscript studies to share projects that reflect new developments and chart future possible courses for the field.

The deadline for paper proposals is: 15 September 2016

Please send the abstract of your proposed paper (300 words maximum), CV with current contact information, and completed Participant Information Form (available at https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to the organizers: Judith Golden (jkgolden@princeton.edu) and Jessica Savage (jlsavage@princeton.edu)

New Publication: Patronage, Power and Agency in Medieval Art

patronage-power-263x330COLUM HOURIHANE: Preface.
ELIZABETH CARSON PASTAN: Foreword.
COLUM HOURIHANE: Introduction.
JILL CASKEY: Medieval Patronage & Its Potentialities.
JULIAN LUXFORD: The Construction of English Monastic Patronage.
ELIZABETH CARSON PASTAN: Imagined Patronage: The Bayeux Embroidery & Its Interpretive History.
SHEILA BONDE; CLARK MAINES: The Heart of the Matter: Valois Patronage of the Charterhouse at Bourgfontaine.
CLAUDINE LAUTIER: The Canons of Chartes: Their Patronage and Representation in the Stained Glass Cathedral.
ANNE DERBES: Patronage, Gender & Generation in Late Medieval Italy: Fina Buzzacarini and the Baptistery of Padua.
BENJAMIN ZWEIG: Picturing the Fallen King: Royal Patronage & the Image of Saul’s Suicide.
NIGEL MORGAN: What are they Saying? Patrons & Their Text Scrolls in Fifteenth-Century English Art.
ROBIN CORMACK: ‘Faceless Icons’: The Problems of Patronage in Byzantine Art.
CORINE SCHLEIF: Seeking Patronage: Patrons & Motions in Language, Art, and Historiography.
ADELAIDE BENNETT: Issues of Female Patronage: French Books of Hours, 1220-1320.
STEPHEN PERKINSON: Portraits & Their Patrons: Reconsidering Agency in late Medieval Art.
LUCY FREEMAN SANDLER: The Bohun Women & Manuscript Patronage in Fourteenth-Century England.
ADEN KUMLER: The Patron-Function