Author Archives: medievalartresearch

Call for Participants: MAIUS Workshop, 13/03/2018, Deadline TODAY

Maius Workshop

MAIUS Workshop Meeting
March 13, 6 – 7:30
Senate House, Rm G21A

Please join us for our next meeting of graduate students and early career researchers working on Iberian and Latin American studies! The next Maius Workshop will take place at Senate House (Room G21A, Senate House, Malet St, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HU, UK) and will broadly consider issues related to ‘Inside and Outside Geographical Boundaries’.

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Event: Archaeometallurgical Medieval Bell Casting in Paderborn 23/06/208/-28/07/2018

PADERBORN

Zum 950 jährigen Jubliäum des hohen Domes in Paderborn und zum 1000 jährigen Jubiläum der Bartholomäuskapelle hat mich das Metropolitankapitel Paderborn mit der Aufgabe betraut im Rahmen der lebendigen Dombauhütte eine Bienenkorbglocke des 11. Jahrhunderts zu gießen.

Damit hat das Metropolitankapitel die einmalige Gelegenheit geschaffen, der Entstehung einer Bienenkorbglocke des 11. Jahrhunderts beiwohnen zu können. Vom 23.6. -27.7. 2018 werden sämtliche Arbeitsschritte im Abdinghof in Paderborn vor Ort ausgeführt, wobei ausschließlich historisch nachgewiesene Materialien verwendet werden.
Zur Anwendung kommt der Vorläufer des moderneren Lehmhemdverfahrens: Die älteren Bienenkorbglocken wurden mit dem Wachsausschmelzverfahren gegossen. Der Benediktinermönch Theohilus Presbyter schrieb dies im 12. Jahrhundert nieder und, dessen ungewöhnlich präzise Anweisungen bilden die Grundlage für die Rekonstruktion des Verfahrens. Es bietet sich hier also die Gelegenheit nicht nur der Entstehung der Glocke beizuwohnen, sondern auch dem Bronzegießer und Archäometallurgen zu allen Details Fragen zu stellen und sich in Wort und Tat überzeugen zu lassen, dass die Rekonstruktion auch funktioniert.
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Call for Papers “To be [titled], or not to be [titled]? Art History and its “well-(un)known” masters…” at Nordik 25-27/10/2018, Copenhagen, Deadline 23/03/2018

Majestatis

It seems to be impossible to imagine an art history without names. In scientific practice the attribution to a “name” can significantly influence the perception and assessment of traditional works of art.
Since the beginning of the 20th century art historians – starting with Adolf Goldschmidt (1863-1944) or Wilhelm Vöge (1868-1952) – often have used to handle art works – especially medieval objects – by their mostly unknown masters (“Künstlerkunstgeschichte”). In Sweden, Johnny Roosval (1879-1965) e. g. finds himself in this tradition by documenting and classifying the inventory of medieval art on Gotland inventing names for artists such as the well-known masters “Byzantios”, “Majestatis” or “Calcarius”

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Lecture: “Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross, Institute for Historical Research, 27/02/2018

Easby Cross

NOW CANCELLED DUE TO INDUSTRIAL ACTION!

 

The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting the following lecture on Tuesday 27th February at 7pm:

Meg Boulton, speaking on ‘”Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross.

Location: Institute of Historical Research, Wolfson Room NB01, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU).

All those who are interested in Medieval Studies are very welcome to attend!

Call for Papers: University of Kent Medieval and Early Modern Studies Summer Festival 15-16/06/2018, Deadline 23/03/2018

2006AH5332_london_panorama

Now in its fourth year, MEMS Summer Festival is a two-day celebration of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, including the study of religion, politics, history, art, drama, literature, and domestic culture from c. 400 – 1800. The festival, hosted at the University of Kent, is designed to bring together scholars from a range of disciplines, academic schools, and institutions. MEMS Fest aims to be an informal space in which postgraduate students, early career researchers, and academics can share ideas and foster conversations, while building a greater sense of community. Undergraduate students in their final year of study are also welcome to participate in the conference.

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Call for Papers: Illuminating the Dark Ages: Manuscript art and knowledge in the Early Medieval World (c. 600-1100), University of Edinburgh, 28-29/06/2018, Deadline 15/03/2018

CfP Edinburgh image.jpg

“Illuminating the Dark Ages” has been conceived as an international conference that aims to bring together researchers of all levels, including postgraduate students, working on the wider Early Middle Ages and the decorated manuscript as a cultural medium. From a variety of perspectives, this conference intends to shed light on how and why manuscripts were decorated in the early medieval period, from lavishly illuminated religious cycles to illustrations of works of Classical literature. Even though the geographical focus is put on the Latin West, comparative approaches to manuscript visual cultures and knowledge transmission in other cultural areas (roughly in the same chronological period), such as Byzantium or the Islamic world, are naturally welcomed.The keynote lectures will be delivered by Prof. Michele Bacci (Fribourg) and Dr. Felicity Harley-McGowan (Yale). Continue reading

Conference: “Bells and Smells: Sensory Experiences of the Medieval Liturgy”, Senate House, University of London, 24/02/2018

Bells and Smells

The five senses occupied an ambiguous place in medieval religious life. For generations of theologians and pastoral writers, the senses were gateways for sin to enter body and soul. And yet, in the rarefied environment of liturgical performance, they became the means by which mortals could apprehend the Almighty. Imagery, music, incense, touch and even taste played a role in shaping medieval worshippers’ encounters with the sacred. The papers in this conference consider how the senses were employed and how they were a source of both religious solidarity and controversy.

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