Monthly Archives: January 2017

Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 43rd Annual Byzantine Studies Conference

hosios-loukas-experiorAs part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 43rd Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, October 5–8, 2017. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.
Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website site (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/43rd-annual-byzantine-studies-conference). The deadline for submission is February 15, 2017. Proposals should include:
—Proposed session title
—CV of session organizer
—300-word session summary, which includes a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering the topic as a prearranged, whole session
—Session chair and academic affiliation. Please note: Session chairs cannot present a paper in the session
—Information about the four papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 500-word abstract. Please note: Presenters must be members of BSANA in good standing
Session organizers may present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organzier is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.
Applicants will be notified by February 20, 2017. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by March 1, 2017. Instructions for submitting the panel proposal are included in the BSC Call for Papers (https://maryjahariscenter.org/assets/sponsored-sessions/2017_BSANA_Call_for_Papers_FINAL.pdf).
If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.
Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.
Advertisements

Fellowship: The Rijksmuseum Fellowship Programme

rijksmuseumwww.rijksmuseum.nl/fellowships

The Rijksmuseum operates a Fellowship Programme for outstanding candidates working on the art and history of the Low Countries whose principal concern is object-based research. The aim of the programme is to train a new generation of museum professionals: inquisitive object-based specialists who will further develop understanding of art and history for the future. The focus of research should relate to the Rijksmuseum’s collection, and may encompass any of its varied holdings, including Netherlandish paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, prints, drawings, photography and historical artefacts. The purpose of the programme is to enable applicants to base part of their research at the Rijksmuseum, to strengthen the bonds between the universities and the Rijksmuseum, and to encourage the understanding of Netherlandish art and history. The programme offers students and academic scholars access to the museum’s collections, library, conservation laboratories and curatorial expertise.

Eligibility
The Rijksmuseum Fellowship Programme provides opportunities for recent graduates (at the Master’s level), as well as doctoral and post-doctoral candidates. The programme is open to candidates of all nationalities and with varied specialisms. They may include art historians, curators, conservators, historians and scientists. Candidates should have proven research capabilities, academic credentials and excellent written and spoken knowledge of two languages (English and preferably Dutch or German). Fellowships will be awarded for a duration ranging from 6-24 months, starting in the academic year 2017-2018. Please review the Rijksmuseum website for detailed information on each individual Fellowship position.

Funding
Fellowship stipends are awarded to help support a Fellow’s study and research efforts during the tenure of their appointment. The stipend amount varies by funding source and Fellowship period. Visit the Rijksmuseum website for further information.

Application and procedure
Please review the eligibility, funding and application requirements by visiting the Rijksmuseum website. For the 2017-2018 academic year, candidates can apply for:
• The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship for art historical research
• The Johan Huizinga Fellowship for historical research
• The Migelien Gerritzen Fellowship for conservation research
• The Manfred & Hanna Heiting Fellowship for photo-historical research

The closing date for all applications is 12 March 2017, at 6:00 p.m. (Amsterdam time/CET). No applications will be accepted after this deadline. All applications must be submitted online and in English. Applications or related materials delivered via email, postal mail, or in person will not be accepted.

Selection will be made by an international committee in April 2017. The committee consists of eminent scholars in the relevant fields of study from European universities and institutions, and members of the curatorial and conservation staff of the Rijksmuseum. Applicants will be notified by 1 May 2017. All Fellowships will start in September 2017.

Further information

www.rijksmuseum.nl/fellowships

For questions concerning the application procedure, contact Marije Spek, Coordinator of the Fellowship Programme (m.spek@rijksmuseum.nl), +31 (0)20-6747395.

CFP: Recovering the Past (York N/EMICS), 2-3 June 2017

Recovering the past can be an arduous and treacherous task and modern scholars frequently find themselves indebted to those who have gone before them. This multi-disciplinary two-day conference sets out to celebrate and analyse the impact the work of previous generations has had on our understanding of the Medieval past. For example, from the mid-nineteenth century onwards there appears to have been an increased interest in cataloguing and preserving the sculpture of the early Medieval period by figures such as John Romilly Allen and Joseph Anderson, whose seminal work The Early Christian Monuments of Scotland, published in 1903, is still the most complete record of the sculpture of early Medieval Scotland and was an influencing factor behind the creation of the British Academy Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture (which published its twelfth volume in 2016), the key text for any scholar working on Anglo-Saxon monumental sculpture and ecclesiastical / secular patronage of the arts in the early Middle Ages. This recording and cataloguing of the past can also been seen during the Medieval period itself with the collation of earlier oral poetry being preserved in manuscripts, such as the ninth-century poem Genesis B preserved within the c. 1000 Bodleian Junius 11 manuscript-version of the near contemporary poem Genesis.

Wider examples of recovering the past include, but are not limited to: recovering the past given the issues surrounding the accuracy/authenticity of primary sources; excavation and/or scientific analysis, the insights these provide and the issues surrounding the findings; the recovery of lost or stolen artefacts during the Medieval period and beyond; highlighting the skewing of the past through the editing of texts since the later sixteenth century, the production of fakes, the re-carving of sculpture; highlighting the use and manipulation of the past to support nationalistic/religious arguments; the varying interests of antiquarians and early historians; as well as museology and the questions surrounding how we engage with and display the Medieval past.

This conference will bring together emerging scholars, early career researchers and established academics from a variety of disciplines to provide a platform to discuss how this important idea was manifested in the textual, visual and material evidence of the Medieval world and beyond. It aims to examine the implications and the significance of ‘recovering the past’ in its widest possible contexts.

Possible subjects include but are not limited to:

  • Antiquarianism and/or the recording and cataloguing of the Medieval past
  • Historiographies
  • Archaeological investigations
  • Stolen and/or recovered artefacts
  • The creation of fakes: including the re-carving of sculpture and the ‘editing’ of texts
  • Reconstructing fragmentary texts, narratives or objects
  • The recording of the oral tradition during the Medieval period and beyond
  • Issues surrounding the accuracy/authenticity of primary source material
  • Museology and the displaying of the Medieval past

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words (with a short biography) to Elizabeth Alexander (ea502@york.ac.uk) by 17 Feburary 2017.

For Further information on the Northern/Early Medieval Interdisciplinary Conference Series please see our website: northernemics.wordpress.com.

At Close Quarters: Experiencing the Domestic, 1400-1600

unnamedThis interdisciplinary conference examines late medieval and early modern experiences ‘at close quarters’. Building on recent research into the architecture and objects that shaped the pre-modern household, we examine the nooks and crannies, challenges and constructions of the domestic environment, and its interaction with art, literature and thought.

Register here.

Friday, 3rd March. York. Bowland Auditorum, Berrick Saul Building.

Registration 9.00-9.20
Welcome 9.20

Conference Keynote 9.30-10.30

Tara Hamling (University of Birmingham) and Catherine Richardson (University of Kent) A Day at Home in Early Modern England: The Materiality of Domestic Life.

Coffee 10.30-11.00

Session One 11.00-12.30: Challenging Domesticities

Doron Bauer and Elena Paulino (Florida State University and Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florence) The Textual Construction of Domestic Spaces in Late Medieval and Early Modern Majorca.
Angela Nicholls (University of Warwick) Hearth and Home: Living in An Almshouse in Early Modern England.
María Molina (Independent Scholar) Homes in Troubled times: Domesticity and Emotions in Granada during the Sixteenth Century.

Lunch 12.30-13.30

Session Two 13.30-15.00: Constructing the Domestic

Christina Farley (University of Cambridge) When Walls Talk: Liveliness in the Tudor Domestic Interior.
Samantha Chang (University of Toronto) Enter Stage Left: Stepping into the Seventeenth-Century Painter’s Studio.
Iman Sheeha (University of Warwick) Look in the place where he was wont to sit/ His Blood! It is too manifest:’ The House as Extension of Identity in The Tragedy of Master Arden of Faversham.

Tea Break 15.00-15.30

Session Three & Closing Remarks 15.30-16.30: Looking Forward: Historic Interiors in the Present Day

Gillian Draper (University of Kent) Show-rooms? The Nature and Impact of the Public Presentation of Historic Domestic Interiors Today.

Announcement: Society for the Study of the Church Interior

S.-Maria-gloriosa-dei-Frari-Title-page-1500-500.jpgWhat is the study of the church interior?

The church was a highly meaningful site for pre-Modern European society. As architectural sites accessible to all strata of society, church buildings provided contexts for interaction between social classes and genders, and settings for a wide variety of religious and non-religious activities. From an art-historical perspective, the vast majority of artworks produced in the medieval and Renaissance periods was intended for the many chapels, altars and screens in the church interior.

Yet, despite the obvious importance of these sites, the spatial dispositions of church interiors – and how they evolved over time – are still little-understood. Centuries of restorations and adaptations have radically transformed the appearance and usage of church interiors: screens have been removed; altars shifted position; new liturgical furnishings installed; fresco decoration whitewashed; and seating added or taken away.

Scholars studying the church interior seek to reconstruct the meaning, functions and visual appeal of these sacred spaces. The Society for the Study of the Church Interior seeks to promote this holistic and interdisciplinary approach to researching historic church buildings.

Who are we?

We are a group of scholars who are interested in the material culture, spatial dynamics and multifarious functions of the church interior in the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. We are mainly based in the US, Germany, Italy and the UK, but welcome members from around the world.

Primarily focused on pre-Modern Italy, we are interested in reconstructing aspects of individual churches, but also in broader issues associated with large-scale changes to architectural layouts generally associated with religious reform. In addition to purely art-historical inquiry, we investigate the religious, political or practical motivations behind transformation campaigns and the effects such changes had on the use of church buildings.

What do we do?

Studying the church interior presents complex challenges for the historian, given that documentary, archaeological and material sources can be fragmentary or even contradictory. Our research involves the analysis of several types of primary and secondary source material, which may include:

  • Original archival documentation such as payments, contracts, testaments, etc
  • Liturgical texts
  • Official records of Visitations conducted by bishops and other clergy
  • Historic ground plans
  • Antiquarian guidebooks
  • Modern restoration records
  • Material evidence of surviving architecture
  • Archaeological reports
  • Provenance of objects such as altarpieces and liturgical furnishings

What are the activities of the Society?

The Society promotes broader engagement with the study of the church interior, disseminates research findings and fosters an academic community of like-minded scholars.

In the future, we hope to organize sessions and meetings at major conferences such as the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting.

We are also in the process of establishing an online, collaborative database to collect data on the church interior. Initially concentrating on Italy, where the impact of the Counter Reformation was particularly strong, the database will reveal the broad patterns and chronologies which are currently beyond the grasp of the individual researcher. Members of the Society who wish to contribute to the database will receive a login to access it: please email Joanne or Michael if you are interested.

Sign up for the mailing list here.

CFP: Hybrids and Hybridity (University of Reading, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies), 20-21 April 2017

screen-shot-2017-01-26-at-11-14-18-amThe deadline for paper proposals for University of Reading, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies (GCMS) 2-day conference, ‘Hybrids and Hybridity’ has now been extended to the 17th of February.

Aimed at providing a platform for post-grad and early career researchers examining the idea of hybrids and hybridity in the medieval and early modern periods, the conference offers a chance to present your work within an informal environment – be that a fully-formed paper or a more exploratory questioning of these concepts through themes including, but not limited to:

 

  • Imagery
  • Identity
  • Gender
  • Transition
  • Liminality

For any questions or to submit an abstract, please feel free to contact the organizers at gcms.reading@gmail.com.

Murray Seminars on Medieval and Renaissance Art at Birkbeck, Spring Term 2017

0067_allegory_of_justice_-_injustice-144a8d98631489020fe18th Jan Zsofia Buda ‘The Lady with the book and the closed curtain: iconographical peculiarities in a 15th-century Jewish service book for Passover’ discusses some unusual illustrations in a South German Jewish service book for Passover, finding among other things some surprising similarities with Christian iconography

22 Feb Laura Jacobus ‘”Mea culpa?” Penitence, Enrico Scrovegni and me’ The Arena Chapel in Padua was until very recently thought to be commissioned as an act of restitution for usury, and its frescoes by Giotto as an expression of penitence on the part of the patron Enrico Scrovegni. That view has now been challenged by Laura Jacobus and others. But two of her recent discoveries have the potential to reinforce the established view and undermine her own. What happens when a researcher uncovers inconvenient truths, and what is to be done?

15th March Péter Bokody ‘The Politicization of Rape: Giotto’s Allegory of Injustice in Padua’ suggests that the allegory of Injustice in the Arena Chapel (Padua) by Giotto and the allegory of War in the Palazzo Pubblico (Siena) by Ambrogio Lorenzetti are key allegorical images of rape which can offer critical and politicized representations of sexual violence without sanitizing or eroticizing the act. Their unparalleled representations of sexual violence have implications for a general history of rape and the visual culture of late-medieval Italy.

All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm. Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments. We hope to see you there.